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4

Sometimes you'll see authors avoid constantly repeating character names by replacing them with descriptors. For instance (assume that all three descriptors are referring to John, the tall man who is Martha's son). John walked to the window. The tall man looked across the field. Martha's son was feeling lonely this morning. Don't do that. It's ...


1

It is natural for people to notice any physical feature that stands out, but some words such as "tall", "big", "fat", "short" etc are not that descriptive. Adding "very" doesn't help. If it is necessary to describe somebody's height, then it is better to use a comparison. "He was tall, nobody else in the crowd reached his chin." Also, in terms of ...


10

This reads completely normal to me and I don't really see anything wrong with it. If "tall" is what identifies the person in this scene it would be normal to use that if the narrator doesn't know the name of the person or wants to emphasize this person being "tall" for whatever reason, such as a small room or something like that. Don't necessarily listen ...


6

Focus on the character's experience. Your narrator feels distant from your character and that's why you're struggling with word choice (and I realize you are only giving us short bits from your narrative here). Get in there and tell the reader about the character's emotional state. He heard a strange noise. Was he curious or freaked out that it sounded ...


2

Q. Do I use active verbs or nouns in a job description? The key is brevity. You want your reader to remember the relevant information, without having to process loads of unnecessarily long grammatical constructs. If you think of it, these descriptions are often arranged as lists, instead of writing a narrative across long paragraphs. The rationale is again ...


8

Jane popped the stone in her hand. First, I think you know that isn't the right word, the image is like popping a balloon. Second, don't tell us, just show us, describe the scene, and don't worry about if it takes more words. Don't make us guess what she's doing, show us, and tell us what she is thinking, so we become immersed in being Jane for a moment. ...


3

That formation is called an arch, and it connects what may soon become a stack to the main coastline. The key points of both archs and stacks is that they form by erosion. In contrast, a peninsula is typically a larger landmass formed by accretion or alternative means other than erosion. Italy is a peninsula, to give an example. The links: https://en....


6

Unless you are writing a police report or a scientific article, where telling the facts is of paramount importance, I fail to see the benefit or purpose of such a description. If the weighting of the object is the central point of the narration, then there is no need to tell it to the reader; in fact by this point it should be clear that she needs to weigh ...


0

The word you're looking for is 'peninsula'. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Peninsula


4

In what context did you work? Those interfaces have probably been in the context of a certain topic. What kind of software did you analyze and optimize? Was it financial software? Something in the game industry? ERP? You have said much about the technology that you have worked with so far, but you haven't said a single word about the context in which you ...


1

What you are really doing with scene setting is contextualizing the reader, not just in terms of physical place, but also history, attitudes, mood, relationships, and much much more. Given that, there are no hard-and-fast rules for how much is too little and how much is more than enough. What you don't --typically! --want is for the reader to be free-...


2

So I personally find it helpful to look at examples of literature that I like, and one of the best authors I know for drawing you immediately into a scene is Roger Zelazny. If you try to dissect his technique then I would say that he tries to build two or three scenes into every chapter, so every chapter contains some sort of action or movement from one ...


1

If you're consistently beginning every scene you write with a description, you're running the risk of losing the reader. Beginning a scene by describing the location where the scene takes place, or of a person central to the scene, or of an object that is significant to the scene--this is a valid way to begin a scene. but there are other opening techniques, ...


4

what are the important elements to consider, and how long should the description be, before getting on with the narration? The most important element to consider is why the reader is reading it. Presuming you are writing a novel, and it is supposed to be entertaining. Your goal is to keep a reader interested in what you are presenting. Readers are not that ...


2

+1 Cyn. In addition to setting the scene, be certain that as the scene unfolds the goal of the scene (shorthand for the goal of the main character) is clear. In a good scene, there will probably be some form of conflict. Stakes should also be clear. What will it cost the character if they don't reach their goal? At times, goals and stakes are muted, and ...


9

Each chapter will open on something that sets the scene to come. A descriptive paragraph (or other length) that focuses on the setting is a perfectly legitimate way to do this, but it's not required. You can also open with dialogue, or character thoughts, or an action, for example. If you have multiple POVs, you may wish to start each chapter with ...


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