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2

Additionally, the character is an amnesiac runaway, so I cannot easily do things like show their non-white relatives, have them describe experiences relating to a specific east Asian culture, have them offhandedly use phrases in another language, or even use their first or last name to show that they are biracial. E.g., Anne Boonchuy from Amphibia is Thai-...


0

For characters set in worlds patterned after ours, the name is a strong method to indicate their ethnicity or mixed heritage. Duncan McCloud of Clan McCloud is easily identifiable as Scottish by western audiences. In Altered Carbon by Richard Morgan, Takeshi Kovacs' mixed heritage is suggested by the combination of Japanese and Hungarian names. It's not a ...


-1

A well-known and still uncontroversial scientific fact is that people of East Asian descent are generally less capable of digesting diary products (than people of Caucasian or Black descent). Mayby you can write something about the character getting stomach pain after eating a pizza.


0

Here is the worst example I could think of where a writer omitted mentioning a detail of their protagonist's appearance until that detail became important to the story, thus making that detail seem like a deus ex machina. There is a famous science fiction story "Deadline", by Cleve Cartmill, Astounding Science Fiction, March 1944, about wartime ...


1

As well as describing the red hair early as the other answers suggest I'd also advise describing it explicitly. Don't feel obligated to add in all your character's other physical traits as well, if the red hair is the only trait that is relevant make it the only one you describe. Otherwise the reader may not pick up on it. For example I was reading a story ...


3

For many people, the story plays out like a movie in their head as they read. If you don't "cast" a face into the role quickly, they'll have already filled it with their own imagination. Within a few sentences of introducing a new character, stories tend to describe the important characteristics you'd notice if you saw them on screen to avoid ...


3

Do it early, if at all. People usually form their impressions of a character based on the first time they see them enter the story, and if you don't describe them there the image won't stick in their mind. But later, about six chapters in, another character mentions that she has red hair. Will this disrupt the mental image that readers have already formed ...


-1

Actually, a character usually gets by with very little physical description. If it's not necessary for the plot, I wouldn't mention the red hair at all, so that you don't confuse the reader unnecessarily and ruin his own imagination.


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