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I would echo other posters' sentiment. It sounds like you have a beta reader instead of several. I would encourage you seek out other beta readers. Or, I would suggest a developmental editor, if your current beta reader is not a professional. A friend of mine beta read my first novel. He had beta-read for a lifelong friend who was a well-published author. ...


2

It's a very good thing to pay attention to what your readers tell you, at least it gives the impression that you are a rather open-minded person. It seems to me that your reaction to criticism is rather a symptom of a larger problem. I'm just guessing, but maybe the reason you don't know whether to incorporate a plot change or not, is that you don't have a ...


3

As a person I’m a bit of a people-pleaser. I tend to bend over backwards to avoid conflict and make people happy. I’ve reached the point in my writing process where I’ve started to send out drafts of my work to beta readers to get feedback. However, I've started to notice a bit of a problem in that when I get feedback I feel compelled to incorporate it all ...


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Writing is like most other creative processes. A previous answer is right -- people know if they don't like it, but they don't really know what is wrong. Listen to the emotional content of the feedback rather than the analysis, but, especially if you are still writing the first draft, don't listen too closely, nor too quickly. Get your thoughts written. ...


33

I'm fond of the following quote from Neil Gaiman: Remember: when people tell you something's wrong or doesn't work for them, they are almost always right. When they tell you exactly what they think is wrong and how to fix it, they are almost always wrong. You're the cook, they're the diner. If they don't like the taste of the omelet, you can't tell them ...


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