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1 vote

How do I avoid using "the" in a story?

Think of it this way: the word 'the' is a rudimentary word of the English language. Like it or not, you kind of have to use it sometimes. There are several words that the eye can just glance over ...
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0 votes

How do I frame this question?

Hopefully, one of these'll work. From where does sin spring from? What place is to blame for sin? What houses sin? In what house/place does sin dwell? Where is sin birthed? What is the crucible of ...
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0 votes

How do I avoid using "the" in a story?

I don't think you're overusing 'the', I think that you're underusing descriptions. Take for example this sentence: Remember, I put it on the block in the wall where the frame of the door is. This ...
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2 votes

How would i go about censoring adult language in my book for school?

Keep in mind that you don't have to have your character curse in order to be bossy and arrogant. You can have that character be insulting without necessarily curse. Another method I have seen in ...
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4 votes

How would i go about censoring adult language in my book for school?

A long accepted practice is to make up words that are fairly obviously the real curse words, but aren't. On the TV Series Battlestar Galactica (long before you were born), they needed the rough and ...
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1 vote

Would it be too presumptuous of any established author to write a novel in the hope that it be made into a film?

A good example I remember is the follow up to "The Silence of the Lambs" (made into a film with Anthony Hopkins and Jodie Foster) "Hannibal" https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/...
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1 vote

Would it be too presumptuous of any established author to write a novel in the hope that it be made into a film?

It is not that it's presumptuous, it's that it's unwise. Perhaps your idea is cinematic. Perhaps it's not. But if you have your eye on making it cinematic, you will not have all your attention on ...
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1 vote

Would it be too presumptuous of any established author to write a novel in the hope that it be made into a film?

No, it is not presumptuous. A movie differs from the novel in that the movie must be primarily visual. A novel is guiding the audience's imagination, And novels depend much more heavily on exposition, ...
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2 votes

Would it be too presumptuous of any established author to write a novel in the hope that it be made into a film?

It would depend on track record. I believe Michael Crichton had sold the film rights to Jurassic Park before the novel was published. He agreed a deal with Spielberg while the novel was still being ...
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0 votes

How to write a character going insane

A character going insane depends upon the depth of a character, like people in real life, some characters can be written going insane easily by small misfortunes if you portray your character as a ...
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1 vote

How to make a serious character interesting or likeable?

Give them a character arc, development, impact of plot and depth. Characters are often likeable if handled correctly. Since your mc is a paladin with a serious nature, explain why they are serious; ...
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3 votes

How to make a serious character interesting or likeable?

Stories borrow heavily from morality roles; we have a hero that is acting pretty selflessly, and a villain that is acting pretty selfishly. In Die Hard, Bruce Willis could at any time walk away, but ...
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4 votes
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How to make a serious character interesting or likeable?

The same way you make any other character interesting and likable. Flesh him out and make him feel like a real person. Understand his motivations and goals, and let the reader inside his head (...
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0 votes

Is it ok to name a character after one in a well-known book?

Yes. Why might that not be OK? Since I've met several women named Wendy - an invention of JM Barrie in Peter Pan - nothing more should need to be said. KRyan's example is clearly legitimate and ...
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0 votes

Is it ok to name a character after one in a well-known book?

There are two issues to consider. Trademark and copyright. Can someone sue you for stealing their character's name? In the case of "Pride and Prejudice", as others have pointed out, the ...
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-1 votes

Are there any particularly easy dialects with which to spice up my bit characters?

Oh, Yah, You Betcha der! I would avoid a lot of phonetic spelling and stick to stereotypical expressions that you see in movies and TV. YES, that's awful, poor form. These are short-lived characters ...
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0 votes

Is it ok to name a character after one in a well-known book?

Keep in mind: Pride and Prejudice was written in 1813. That's a little more than two hundred years in the past. No one's going to be 'offended' by this. Also, not as many people as you might think ...
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1 vote
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Do you have to hire an editor to see if your novel is appropriate for an age group?

I would personally not get an editor to say what age range your book is for. For one, editors will probably not do anything for free. For another thing, it's fairly easy to tell. Think of your book as ...
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9 votes

Is it ok to name a character after one in a well-known book?

When using the name of a famous character, you want to consider two things. 1-Will people accuse you of stealing it? Pride and Prejudice is from 1813, so copyright is no problem, but the book is ...
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8 votes

Is it ok to name a character after one in a well-known book?

"Pride and Prejudice" was published in 1813 and is in public domain now. You are free to use any names from it. Another question is if you really want to create this name allusion for the ...
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2 votes

Alternatives to raising eyebrows to show surprise

There are different flavors of surprise: Some are delightful, some make you angry, some raise your curiosity, some are hard to believe. Each flavor may cause a different reaction. Raising an eyebrow, ...
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13 votes
Accepted

Alternatives to raising eyebrows to show surprise

Alternatives: Every expression conveys subtly different messages. All these are in the same family, but each means a tiny bit different thing. Glare: Implies a bit of hostility. Just stared: Suggests ...
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3 votes
Accepted

Is this telling and not showing, and why is it ok in here?

"Show, don't tell" doesn't apply to manga or comic books the same way it applies to standard prose. On the one hand, because manga and comics are visual media, almost everything in them is ...
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6 votes

Is this telling and not showing, and why is it ok in here?

"Show don't tell" is not an absolute, inviolable law that will get you cast into writer's purgatory if you break it. It's a guide for writing a better story, by being mindful of what will ...
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