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Speculative Work and Self Employment You are in effect working for yourself, without pay or profit in the short term, in hopes of selling your product for pay [and ideally profit] in the future. As such it can be strongly advised to consider your ventures in the same line as you would any other small business. Focus on your product, what you are selling, ...


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Here’s a few, I’m not sure if they’re particularly British, but I think they might work. Smash hit Crowning achievement Bull’s eye Hole in one Big hit Win Feather in cap Knockout


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Do not come to any art for the profit. When the profit fails to come, you'll be discouraged. Do it for the love of it first then other things, money too shall follow. Ernest Hemingway advised: "Work every day no matter what has happened the day or night before, get up and bite the nail". That's the spirit of the advice.


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Some people are volunteers, and they never get paid (except with a verbal or written thank you). Some people get paid as soon as they do something (e.g. a waiter paid almost entirely in tips). Some people get paid at the end of the day. Some people get paid at the end of the week. Some people get paid at the end of the month. You are working a job where ...


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@Yostina, I truly hope you find a way to conquer your fear. I was absolutely terrified the first time I forced myself to hit the post button. I was so sure of the only two possible results. Either I was going to be told to go away and never come back or worse yet, there would not be a single response. My grammar isn't perfect and I have had a love affair ...


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Lord of the Rings is as definitive an example of Fantasy as they come. It might even be the benchmark others are measured against. The ideas of elves, dwarves, etc. predate JRRT, but he was the one that most later writers based their races upon. At the same time, Lord of the Rings includes very few uses of magic. They're very impactful, and magic is ...


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In writing you have fiction and non-fiction. Under fiction, you have fantasy and reality. Reality is a story that could conceivably happen in our world/reality. Fantasy is anything that couldn't or hasn't happened. Within fantasy, you have SciFi, Magical, Alternate reality, etc. Within reality, you have mysteries, westerns, romance, etc. To me, the ...


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A change that I made that reawakened my interested and excitement about my story was to stop writing in linear, chronological order. I've been thinking about this current story for nearly a decade, so I already had a solid idea of the overall plotline. And I've been doing a lot more world-building and research than I usually do, so I knew a lot about the ...


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You could say that something is fantasy because laws of science are ignored, like the conservation of momentum, without being seemingly science based, like sci-fi. You could avoid explaining these aspects as magic.


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One might characterize most fiction in which people find true love or amazing success and live happily ever after as "fantasy" without the plot having "magic."


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I am a discovery writer. The main and broad definition is that a discovery writer does not outline stories beat by beat, or chapter by chapter, or even Act by Act. The reason for this, as I found for myself about 35 years ago, and have heard from many other discovery writers, is a psychological quirk we have: For us, outlining drains the life out of the ...


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Don't do it top-down, do it bottom-up. Break your story into chunks of index cards. Sort your cards in the order you felt most natural. Then put 95% of the index cards into a jar. Congratulation, now you can work on the most significant 5% of your story. The index cards in the jar now only functions as a source of inspiration, you should not put it in ...


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I don't think it's common practice at all. I also don't think it's a good idea for similar reasons as covered in Using footnotes in fiction: children's book which can be enjoyed by adults already linked by F1Krazy. If at all possible, I'd include reminders about who this character is or when the reader might have last seen them within the text itself. ...


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Footnotes informing a reader of which previous work an event occurred in are ubiquitous in comic books, but I've never heard of them being done in a novel before, nor would I really recommend it. The general consensus on another recent question about using footnotes in a novel was that it was a bad idea and would break a reader's immersion. Or is it ...


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Fantasy isn't defined only by magic. I was a fan of fantasy literature for many years before coming across anyone trying to define "fantasy" as "stuff involving magic", which I've never really understood. For me, being set in an alternate world (including a fictional world-within-a-world like Harry Potter or Artemis Fowl) was always a bigger fantasy ...


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Perhaps if you need a term, try "magical realism"? 98% like our world, but that little difference is what makes it fantasy... whether it's if subways will sometimes take you sideways to a different realm or unexpected country, or the Byzantine Empire stayed pagan, or if whenever Bob reads a book, all other copies of it are forever deleted, but he ...


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Low vs High Fantasy: A sliding definition Humans love to makeup labels and group things, but some [many? Most?] subjects don't actually play as nice as we might like the deeper we dive into them. When it comes to grouping and classifying in literature we have some rather awkward issues in drawing lines in the sand and settling on what goes where. If you ...


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There is also a genre called "Science Fantasy", also "Hard Fantasy" (borrowing from "Hard Science Fiction", which doesn't break any laws of physics) and of course just plain "Science Fiction". The genres with "Fantasy" in the name, even without magic, may have for example Dragons, not as magical creatures but just creatures. They may have other species ...


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Firstly, it's certainly not going to be a 'waste of time' to write the story you want to tell, regardless of which genre it might end up being described as. Fantasy is a very broad genre; any story recognizably set in a world other than our own can easily be described as fantasy if it doesn't focus strongly on themes that would suggest another (the effects ...


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I believe low fantasy can encompass stories which have no magic. In some examples I've seen of low fantasy there is no magic but the setting in which it takes place is an entirely fictional world complete with fictional religious and belief systems. For example one of my favorite authors David Gemmell in his book Legend, the book takes place in an ...


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Here is how I dealt with Lissien, the language in my dragon book. Pick a few root words and use them a lot. This gives readers an idea of what you mean, through repetition and similarity. Thus the dragons are Lissai, their language Lissien, an adolescent dragon is a glissond, an adult female an olissair, a clan leader is a hlissak, the king is hlissosak, ...


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There are two kinds of discovery, not one! I am a outliner, not a pantser. I am also a plot-driven, not a character-driven writer. I love outlining, but always the finished product has huge departures from the outline. What I outline is plot, with very little character work. The plot is my creativity set free to do what comes easily: creating worlds and ...


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Try breaking your outline into chunks, and write small novelettes for them. At the moment, you "feel like [you] have already completed the task" - you look at the skeleton in place, and think "that looks the right shape". There's nothing wrong with that. But, if you look at the outline from a different angle, you have actually turned 1 task (write a story)...


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I am a discovery writer, I have been for many years, and I complete stories. Scrap your outline. Most discovery writers (including me) have struggled with what you are talking about; finding the climax, resolving the character arcs, dead-end "mysteries" that we could never figure out. The solution to that is simple, but it is NOT outlining. For a ...


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The only way to resolve it is to write. I'm a discovery writer too. I get excitement from just "imagining" how things could go, how the world might be, and how the character should react. Did you notice? I used verbs in conditional form. That's because - no matter what your brain tells you - a story isn't done until you write it. It doesn't matter if you ...


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Your brain is convinced it's done with the first draft, which means it's time to start the second draft on the story cleaning up everything and filling up any missing details as needed. Which is a new task and one that you have to do regardless of how complete the first draft is. Yours just happens to be pretty barebones in the second half, but that's ok, ...


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It's not particularly difficult. Tense is a tool feared by too many aspiring writers. What you appear to be asking can be seen in Forrest Gump (film). I am sitting on a bench waiting for a bus (present). Whilst I'm waiting I will relay to anybody who wishes to listen events that led me to this point in my life (still present). My momma was . . . (past). ...


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Evernote I personally have 2 (free) accounts on Evernote, that share almost all notes, meaning I can use them on all my devices. There are online and downloaded versions of the notes application for all devices to my knowledge, and you can create notes or "notebooks" (notebooks contain multiple notes) for things such as "characters", "world", "plot points", ...


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Always maintain some distance between yourself and the character. Ensure that the character is somebody you can empathize with, but somebody who is fundamentally and emphatically not you. As in "I could not be that person". It's a little bit like avoiding nepotism: If you hire a relative, or you're a judge deciding a relative's lawsuit, you can't help but be ...


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I agree with Klara. The strategy I often use is to devise a character that has both a superpower AND a significant weakness, and devise a plot in which her superpower is of very limited help, and the only way she can truly prevail is to overcome her weakness. She may be able to fly, but she is not a detective. Superman can keep law and order among normal ...


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You can definitely have characters that fulfill your fantasies. You can even have a character that represents you, the writer. There is nothing inherently wrong with that. The problem is that a lot of inexperienced writers can fall prey to making characters Canon Sues (or Mary Sues) if they happen to personally identify them, or see them as their own ...


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In 3rd person limited, which you are writing it, it is perfectly valid to describe what somebody is feeling, like panic, or horror, or anger, or whatever. That includes pain. It seems like you feel restricted to describing actual thoughts and what he knows; but being tortured is not an intellectual exercise, it is a visceral exercise of enduring searing pain,...


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I would advise a dream like haze of blending reality. Dreams can be influenced by real world stimuli (I once had a dream that I was with Scooby-Doo and the gang and we were trying to solve a mystery that included an odd sound no one could find a source for. When I woke up, it turned out that it was my parent's alarm clock). A much odder phenomena is "...


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There are technical differences between a play and a screenplay. Amadeus has set you on a good path. The, often overlooked, important difference between a play and screenplay is the required location discipline. A director may move cameras at any point to any location but there is only ONE stage. Subsequently, if you were writing a play: "Emigrating to ...


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A "script" is general; a "screenplay" is something to be filmed. A "play" is something to be performed on a stage, and more limited because of that; for example all kinds of things can be done in a screenplay, with special effects, sound effects, dubbing, green screens, etc, things you just can't do on stage. For example, a person can literally dissolve or ...


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Yes, writing a new language for you story is quite challenging. In working on fictional languages in the past, I started by determining what sounds the nationality uses (there are hundreds of basics sounds used in English, but most people stick with the Phoenician alphabet for simplicity's sake), then deciding on a subject phrase syntax (subject-adjective-...


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Whatever language your readers speak, they expect your book to be "translated" into that language. I write in English for English speakers, I have written stories set in the ancient past where the characters, at best, would be speaking in Old English, but that might as well be a different language. I was careful to not use "modern" words and stick with ...


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So, there are several ways to do this: First, translate into English everything except proper nouns (specific names of people, places, or things) or culturally unique concepts, and insulting words or expressive comments (Mein Gott! for a German who is fluent in English) and anything with counting or math that does not need to be done in communications (even ...


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No. Use the words that you want/need to use. Kids have NO idea what is or is not a big word. Kids are a blank slate. Every word is big to them. So no word is big to them. This is why there are plenty of 4 year olds who can rattle off the scientific names of dozens of dinosaurs. Big words are not a problem for kids. To you it is a big word. To kids ...


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It doesn't hurt to have other characters react to him, the potential problem I see here is in repeatedly showing the same reaction, which is likely. Confusion, a sense Hadden is a rude jerk, etc. The reaction of Lemarc is the obvious one to a Spock-like or Data-like character, which is what Hadden is. Showing the obvious response first is fine, but readers ...


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There are no hard and fast rules about how long a chapter needs to be, or should be. A chapter in a novel is a consumable / semi-self contained chunk of a story, it may contain one or more scenes. If the average length of your chapters in your story is 5000 words, there is nothing to say that you can't have a mega chapter with 15,000 words, or a tiny ...


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yes i agree it doesn't matter how many chapters you have it only matters if your happy with it and you put a lot of hard work into the pages "writing a book is not easy and it is a lot of hard work but it is one of life's satisfying achievements" Thanks Myah Mitchell


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The best bet you have is looking directly at the source material - e.g., real felines fighting. Of course it would help narrowing down to one species (the domestic cat is very different, in terms of survival instincts, from the african lion). If you lived with a couple of cats, you should have a good idea of how they fight and how they spar. If you don't, ...


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As an author, you have a couple of superpowers which you can bestow upon your characters: Super perception. You know every detail in your story, including those a normal person wouldn't even notice. You can let your characters notice any small detail which will help them to accomplish their goals. Super memory. Any factoid in your world is either invented ...


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A university. If you want your writing evaluated, apply for a relevant university course and use said writing as a part of the work you produce for that course (e.g. a university assignment, a thesis, a research paper, etc). You may be able to pay an academic thousands of dollars to evaluate your writing and give you feedback, but they're typically very ...


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The services exist, google "critique service" (without the quotes). Ignore the "copyedit" services (if that is all they do), they are just checking spelling and grammar and formatting. Actual critique services are just damn expensive; running roughly $100/hr, or if the work is long enough, around 2-4c per word, OR $10.00/page for short works, or $8.00 per ...


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I've never used any online service for reviewing, editing, and/or critique. I always get it from peers and mentors. There are some advantages to having your writing reviewed online, like speed and convenience, but in the end, you don't really know where it's going or who's really reading it. I would recommend finding people you trust--coworkers, friends, ...


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One way to depict a brilliant military mind is to find a successful battle or campaign in history which starts from similar conditions to the type of starting conditions you want at the start of the battle or campaign in your story, and then more or less copy the historical battle or campaign. But you change details to perhaps copy an event in Earth's ...


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One of the things I find most powerful for constructing strategies or schemes which may go beyond what the author could do themselves is show don't tell. If you tell the audience what the strategy is, they can poke holes in it. "What if X happened?" "What if Y didn't show up?" However, if you show them what happens, that's all they have. It's ...


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