19

To echo the comment from F1Krazy, you only need knowledge of quantum physics if your story depends upon quantum physics. You could write about information technology, orbital mechanics, synthetic biology, or a dozen other topics without ever mentioning (or understanding) quantum mechanics. While there are many different ways to write fiction, it would seem ...


19

What kind of land is it? No man is an island, and no desolation is empty. The moon will be stark black sky against endless grainy grey wastes of fine dust and rock. Deserts will be hot and dry, with blowing sand and dead brush, dried up river beds and alkali lakes. A steppe would be open, with grass matted down from perpetual winds. The artic would be ...


12

Let’s start with ‘Water, Water, Everywhere, nor any drop to drink.’ from the The Rime of the Ancient Mariner It provides some simple essential facts — surrounded by water — followed by something a little bit surprising and counter intuitive — that the water is undrinkable. Our imagination searches for reasonable reasons to explain this, and we intuit some ...


12

I think there are two pieces of advice I can give you that would both make your writing stronger and lead to longer stories. Both of them are pretty basic pieces of advice, but they don't mean you're a terrible or beginning writer - they're the kinds of things that are so deep that you will spend your entire writing career learning more about them. But at ...


8

I cannot do better than the answer by JoeStonecash in addressing the big-picture question, and I encourage you to take that advice and in particular to not worry about quantum physics until it somehow becomes critical to your story. At the same time, I wholeheartedly agree with the comment by Patrick Stevens that "the subject is unique among the ...


7

Yes, but it would be highly unrealistic. The reason humor exists is it's a coping mechanism... people make jokes to deal with uncomfortable topics or get through fears. It's not that it detracts from the work... it's that in a real situation, someone is going to try and bring a smile to the room, even if they're in an inappropriate situation. The work ...


5

First things first is that don't go by page or word count: If your using a word processor, most are written to 8.5x11 inch paper at 12 point font... most books are not that big (not only are the pages smaller, but the font is... but not as much) meaning that what happens on your page 17 might not be the same on page 17 of the final book. Additionally in ...


4

Probably not. You can certainly write a story without any intentional humour, but you can never rule out the possibility of your audience finding comedy in something that wasn't intended to be comedic, especially in the age of meme culture. Thanos' snap at the end of Avengers: Infinity War is a very bleak scene, without a shred of humour, and it took three ...


2

Maybe you shouldn't. Fast-paced stories are fun to read, and they are definitely better without some obsolete scenes/conversations/descriptions, that mean nothing to the story as a whole and won't have an emotional impact on the reader, which is the most important thing IMO. If you want to make it longer, make sure that will add value to the story: character ...


2

It is possible that you're writing a shorter story (i.e. you need to add more events, a sub-plot, twists, and turns to make it into a full-size novel). Or you may be "telling instead of showing". But things like characterization, foreshadowing, etc will also add size to your novel. Or maybe, you're just a very effective writer? Count words, not ...


2

I would argue in a slightly different vein than the other (good) answers. Technically, you don't need to know how quantum physics works at all, to write hard science fiction that uses it. The only thing you need to know is what it can do. Or rather what people that understand it believe it will be able to do in the future. There is of course the engineering-...


2

I think you can remove most comedy from a book, but even just keeping a little bit will help a ton. Just skimming through my memory, I can't remember any (fiction) book I've read that did not have at least a little bit of humor. I definitely would not have a character hanging around just for comic relief in a very serious world. Rather than have a character ...


2

One way to do this is to seed the question by having characters deliberately ask it or invoke the audience to ask it... but do not give the answer. Consider the film Inception where the characters can enter someone's dreams and may even enter their dream persona's own dream... the further down they go, the more likely they are to be lost in the dream world......


1

You need some humor, but no need to overload it As the other answers have mentioned, it is somewhat pointless to read a book that is all dark and dreary. So, it is important for you to include some humor. However, there is no need to overload with humor, you're not writing a comedy. What is humor? Humour or humor is the tendency of experiences to provoke ...


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