19

To echo the comment from F1Krazy, you only need knowledge of quantum physics if your story depends upon quantum physics. You could write about information technology, orbital mechanics, synthetic biology, or a dozen other topics without ever mentioning (or understanding) quantum mechanics. While there are many different ways to write fiction, it would seem ...


19

What kind of land is it? No man is an island, and no desolation is empty. The moon will be stark black sky against endless grainy grey wastes of fine dust and rock. Deserts will be hot and dry, with blowing sand and dead brush, dried up river beds and alkali lakes. A steppe would be open, with grass matted down from perpetual winds. The artic would be ...


17

Not at all. It's not the usual, but the fact is that the hero being the one to fight and defeat/kill the villain is not strictly necessary. Look at The Hunger Games. I think everyone was completely sure Katniss would eventually be the one to kill President Snow. Alas, that wasn't the case. And it was surprising because the novels prepared us for that, it ...


14

This can work, but it depends on your story The quality that makes a protagonist the protagonist is that their decisions are the primary drivers of the plot. There is a fair bit of nuance to that statement (for further reading I recommend the Writing Excuses episode Hero, Protagonist, Main Character ), but the short version is that generally speaking, if ...


13

Tolkien is big on this. Smaug is (arguably) the villain of The Hobbit and is slain by Bard the Bowman, not by Bilbo, or even any of the Dwarves. Likewise, in The Lord of the Rings, Frodo ultimately fails to destroy the One Ring, and it is instead Gollum's obsession with it that carries it (along with him) over the edge into the fires of Mount Doom, defeating ...


12

Let’s start with ‘Water, Water, Everywhere, nor any drop to drink.’ from the The Rime of the Ancient Mariner It provides some simple essential facts — surrounded by water — followed by something a little bit surprising and counter intuitive — that the water is undrinkable. Our imagination searches for reasonable reasons to explain this, and we intuit some ...


12

I think there are two pieces of advice I can give you that would both make your writing stronger and lead to longer stories. Both of them are pretty basic pieces of advice, but they don't mean you're a terrible or beginning writer - they're the kinds of things that are so deep that you will spend your entire writing career learning more about them. But at ...


9

Another plot-line to consider is one often used in film (Seven Samurai, High Plains Drifter) wherein the hero uses his influence to inspire/empower others to take down the antagonist. Often the others have been subjected to the villain's predations but are initially unwilling and/or think they are unable to fight back. This trope has many possible nuances ...


8

I cannot do better than the answer by JoeStonecash in addressing the big-picture question, and I encourage you to take that advice and in particular to not worry about quantum physics until it somehow becomes critical to your story. At the same time, I wholeheartedly agree with the comment by Patrick Stevens that "the subject is unique among the ...


7

Yes, but it would be highly unrealistic. The reason humor exists is it's a coping mechanism... people make jokes to deal with uncomfortable topics or get through fears. It's not that it detracts from the work... it's that in a real situation, someone is going to try and bring a smile to the room, even if they're in an inappropriate situation. The work ...


6

You have four primary options: Edit and rewrite the chapter This is what you should do first before doing any other options. Start by editing your current chapter. If you substantially improve your writing with edits on grammar and flow you may decide to keep the chapter. If not, try at least one time to completely rewrite the chapter and make it different ...


6

You can't. Nor shouldn't. If you want to be symbolic, you should stick with it to the end. Taking out the subtleness to tell the readers straightforward what truly happened can kill the discussion and mystery around the story/movie completely. Though a lot of authors had made similar stuff both "in" the source (by including unnecessary scenes ...


5

Are you writing the diary entries for a school project? If this is not a school exercise and you are doing it for yourself then it doesn't matter what anyone tells you. What matters is what feels right to you and what comes naturally. Feel free to write - Dear John. Write out to your sister, brother, grandmother or mother - if that feels better. Or you know ...


5

A common alternative to having the hero defeat the villain, is for the villain to be defeated as a consequence of their own actions. This makes the villain's defeat seem more karmic, and if the villain is killed in the process, it handily absolves the hero of any responsibility for their death. A well-known example would be the end of Raiders of the Lost Ark....


5

If there are no events, it's very likely that this chapter is not moving the story forward. What is the conflict of the story? How will this contribute to sharpening it? How will it raise the stakes? What effect does it have? If you conclude that it does not have enough effect to justify its existence, you may certainly be right to excise it. If you keep ...


5

Is it considered bad writing if my hero isn't the one who brings about the villain's downfall? This is quite common in historical fiction. The author has to keep the story reasonably consistent with generally known historical facts, which may not leave a lot of room for fiction in that area. If you write a story about your hero storming in and killing ...


5

First things first is that don't go by page or word count: If your using a word processor, most are written to 8.5x11 inch paper at 12 point font... most books are not that big (not only are the pages smaller, but the font is... but not as much) meaning that what happens on your page 17 might not be the same on page 17 of the final book. Additionally in ...


4

Don't try to judge your chapters on your first time through them. If you only have a few thoughts for it right now, just move onto the next chapter. If you suddenly get inspired, come back to this chapter and add onto it. Once you have a pretty complete first draft, go back, look at your overall structure, and decide which chapters need to be in the final ...


4

Probably not. You can certainly write a story without any intentional humour, but you can never rule out the possibility of your audience finding comedy in something that wasn't intended to be comedic, especially in the age of meme culture. Thanos' snap at the end of Avengers: Infinity War is a very bleak scene, without a shred of humour, and it took three ...


3

In your particular case have the movie as a whole get brighter over the course of the movie would let you carry the theme via a wider angle than just the lone light. You can still have arriving at the light be death and in some sense the rest of the film's brightness can kind of represent how close the character is to death (so an extra bright room earlier ...


3

I've written many chapters, and when I write one (and finished it) but ended up not liking it, I save it in a notepad and write a new chapter and see how that goes. If the new one flows better, I simply replace it. I would keep the old chapters for references and maybe IDEAS for future chapters


3

The only thing you can do to move forward is ignore all fear of anyone thinking anything of you. You want to be a writer, that's what you should do. Sure, maybe your first few books won't be taken very well, but I'm sure there's an extremely famous author out there who had a whole bunch of failed books. You have to push through it and use people judging your ...


3

Brace yourself for this answer: The only way to move forward is to disregard opinion of others while you work on your writing, however, always have people you know read passages so you know you’re not full of nonsense. It will be a long time before you write well enough that you are confident in both your skill and talent as a writer to convey your work “as ...


3

Especially with regards to dealing with the fear. Here's what I've learned: Rather than trying to ignore the fear or "fight" it... accept and acknowledge it. Say to it, I hear you, I understand you want to protect me... let's see in detail what this is about? And write it down or verbalize it in front of a mirror. Having it in front of you black on ...


3

I largely agree with the answers provided already. Sharing your writing, when you are learning the craft, and inviting honest critique is an uncomfortable experience. In order to gain confidence in your writing, you must share it, unless you are that very rare bird who possesses a once in a generation talent for the crafts of writing and story telling. ...


3

The only thing you need to ask yourself is this one question: "Do I enjoy writing?" If you enjoy writing, then do it. Do not be afraid. If enjoy writing, the quality of your writing will naturally be superior to those who are just writing just to write. Do NOT let other people's thoughts dictate your life Unless you know you are wrong, then use ...


3

In the 19th century novel the Betrothed the villain dies from completely external causes. The villain is a local noble, surrounded by hitmen and practically untouchable by the heroes, which reminded me of your Mafia boss. The real closure does not come with the villain's death per se although it does allow for that particular resolution to happen. There are ...


3

Readers prefer active heroes because part of why we read fiction is to imagine ourselves facing dilemmas, and to work through different scenarios of how we might respond. There's not as much to learn from a passive hero, whose destiny doesn't revolve around their own choices. For that reason this scenario is challenging to write well. The key is to give the ...


3

A protagonist should solve his or her problem personally, not just stand by while someone else does, although there may well be many people working together that achieve the solution. But the "defeat of the villain" is not always the real issue for the protagonist. Sometimes the villain or antagonist is merely an obstacle, and the real issue is ...


2

There's no real hard and fast rule for this and as such it'll vary from work to work. Put them in the place where it makes the most sense in the narrative. That said, make it clear so the reader will know they're reading a flashback and the context of it should make sense and be relevant to the scene the flashback is framed in.


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