9

five and a half years No hyphens. Hyphens are for adjective phrases: It was a five-and-a-half-year journey. You also don't use the hyphen with the fraction. 51⁄2 years


8

You're only half right. You seem to have forgotten these people are in business to make money by selling works, so the cover letter does two things for them that have nothing to do with your story in particular: They help them filter out submissions that have a lower probability of earning money. A cover letter given short shrift can put them off, they ...


8

It's absolutely fine, and quite correct! It gives the editor very helpful information -- namely, that two different venues have decided to publish your work (and, which, which can sometimes be a helpful indication of strengths and style). If you know when your story is slated to see print, that's worth mentioning -- easier to confirm and check up on -- but ...


7

There are actually quite a few options, many of which come naturally when you're not forced to consciously write formally. You can change the verb into an –ing: "Having done freelance for 8 years, I..." "Choosing to work from home has..." or in some cases turn the verb into the subject or your sentence. "Experience with Java has ...


5

If they want the information in the synopsis, then put it there. I also see no problem mentioning it in the cover letter additionally, but you don't need it there when it is in the synopsis. If you do not have a writing career (yet), then your age (or date of birth) and current profession should be sufficient. Tell them, why you are in expert for children's ...


4

Do it exactly the same way the company does it. If you know what job to apply for, it's because you saw it in an ad, on their website, or in another listing. The hyphen and the slash are used differently. The hyphen means "this job is for a data scientist doing dynamic pricing." The slash means "this job is a combination data scientist and machine ...


4

Maybe it helps if you just change your viewpoint. You probably have written the mail with the viewpoint “I want this job.” Instead, consider the viewpoint ”The company will need to refill that job, and I'm a very good fit.” Think of an advertisement. You'll never find an advertisement that says “We would like you to buy this product. We made it to solve ...


3

I think post by sotondolphin (based on info in the included link) is pretty good, but I have the following disagreements / additions: Make it mistake-free. [Many hirers' attitude is, "If they can't avoid mistakes in a cover letter, then it's guaranteed their work will be even sloppier after I hire them."] I disagree about the technical terms. Often, ...


3

A cover Letter has a fixed structure: The first paragraph describes which position you are applying for and where you found the position. The second paragraph explains why you think you are suitable for this position. The third paragraph is set for follow-up actions you are expecting or you may take (such as hearing from you or "I will call you to ...


3

No, it is not wrong. However, in a cover letter, you should strive for clarity and maybe objectivity. You need to put yourself in the shoes of the person that is going to read that. What information do you want to convey? Your achievements? Your feelings about your achievements? I think that just by putting your achievement in the cover letter already ...


3

Asimov's is one of the best-known, most-respected magazines in the SF genre. Their volume of submissions is immense (I don't know precise numbers, but e.g. F&SF very recently got 192 submissions in a two-day span, after a one-month submission freeze). They publish six issues a year; with usually one novella, maybe two in an issue. Your cover letter ...


2

1. In what format can I write a cover letter? Read the job posting carefully and see if they have any requirements, number one priority is to follow all instructions exactly. In general you want to start by stating the position you're applying for. After that you can use any format you'd like if you believe it will be professional and beneficial. There is ...


2

Instead of saying, "I have experience with X," consider describing what you did with X. "I created a global meteor defense system using Java and Arduino."


2

For magazine writing, it's not so much a "cover letter" you're sending but more of a pitch. This is important because you're not introducing yourself (even though you need to convince the editor that you're THE person to go with for the story), you're trying to sell the story. Hook the editor. Make the person so curious and unsatisfied they s/he must contact ...


2

Speaking as both a professor and corporate division manager at different points in my life: Your cover letter is not your CV, and (as said by ItWasLikeThat) you should not try to cram your CV into it. The cover letter is more of a polite marketing tool to convince the professor you are the one for the job. So I am interested in a brief summary of your ...


2

It depends on the professor’s subject, show the professor how reliable you are for the internship - in your letter, be precise and relevant. To your own accedmics and activities, they might prove you have experience.


2

Academic results and extracurricular activities should be shown in your resume/CV or on an application form if provided. It would be worth considering whether the extracurricular activities are relevant or demonstrate transferrable skills - they can be omitted if not. If the results are there, including them in the cover letter would be repetition, and if ...


2

In business communication, as in most other communication, you want to be as concise as possible while still being effective. Your sentence "The reason for which I am writing..." with or without the "to you" is unnecessarily convoluted. Try "I am writing to express my interest..." or even "I am interested in..." Get to the point. I read a lot of cover ...


2

I read submissions to a literary journal. I never look at the cover letters. They probably matter to the editors if the piece gets accepted, but not to us, the initial readers. Keep them brief. Mention a couple other stories you've published or someone you studied under or a place where you took classes, and that's it. As for your suspicion, every journal ...


1

If you are addressing a specific publisher, you probably have some idea of the kinds of books they put out. The quick and dirty way to find the person to address your submission to is to find a book they have recently published which is similar to yours, and to find out who edited it. Editors often get acknowledged by authors, so this should not be difficult....


1

Personally I use an Excel workbook; the individual spreadsheets hold certain thematically divided elements like opening sentences, skills, personal qualities, relevant experience, etc... Within those spreadsheets there are further divisions based on the type of job I'm applying for, so a block of skill-sentences for desk jobs, a block for workshop positions ...


1

Unfortunately, the magazine's website doesn't have anything useful to say. So one would imagine that standard cover letter advice would apply here. (I got some of this information from the links at the end of this answer, but have condensed, and reworded significantly.) Your name, contact info, and a word count Follow their cover letter guidelines (where ...


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