26

If you're in doubt about your legal obligations, find a copyright lawyer and get some professional advice.


19

Your business is with the client. Tell the writer to contact the client. Inform your client about the demands the writer made and ask him what he wants you to do, tell him that the risk is his. Do all this in email, not verbal.


11

It all depends on the contract. (Bear in mind that I'm not a lawyer. This is my amateur understanding of U.S. copyright law.) If the client was foolish enough to purchase the text from the writer and not insist on a release, then the writer still owns the copyright to the text. If the writer was working as a salaried employee, then any material produced ...


9

I write almost exclusively for corporations and it's rare that the work is attributed to me. It's almost always attributed to an employee from the company. Sometimes they ask but most of the time it's accepted that I'll be ghostwriting. For instance, I'm working with a company now that this was not said outright but because I've been doing this a while I was ...


7

In work-for-hire arrangements, the paying customer usually owns the copyright. It sounds like there was nothing in writing or any discussion about whether it was work-for-hire or simple use of the writer's text. Without the terms stated explicitly, there is a lot of ambiguity. Some things to ask: Did the author have a byline in this text? Did the ...


6

I write a fair bit of user documentation as part of my work and have written many reports like those you mention as part of my postgraduate study. This has given me some familiarity with the subject. I also have a background (and previous career) in sales and marketing and so I know that if you want to sell yourself (or indeed anything) then you need to ...


5

There are different kinds of writing. Writing for business (formal, industry jargon) is not like writing fiction (establishing a world, creating characters) which is not like writing advertising copy (short, compelling, call to action). Copywriters have to learn how to write something which fits in a specified (usually small) space. It has to be memorable ...


4

The envelope line is almost certainly referring to one of two things: 1.) An actual envelope line. If you're functioning as a designer of sorts, as I used to, then your colleague may be simply referring to the physical placement of elements on the envelope. Perhaps what your colleague needs you to do is to move a design element because it interferes with ...


4

They may probably be just right for the target audience - if the target audience is the kind of people who would definitely use the toughness of the car in road traffic, and believe being stronger makes one right. As for me, they are alliterating a crude message. No hint of subtlety, no wit, no distance to self, no humor. And this lack of distance talks to ...


4

Essentially, you're asking, "How can I become a 'punnier' person?" (Or, perhaps more specifically, "What techniques might help me conjure witty puns, rhymes, and play-on-words wordplay more easily?") This is a topic I've mused on for some time. I haven't done any formal research on the subject, but I've observed that some people can pen their parody, poetry,...


4

Let's imagine this goes to court. I'm not a lawyer, and I only have one extracurricular university course of IP law under my belt, but I do have logic. Here's what I think will happen: First, to summarize the argument: The artist believes the contract was worded to license the use of the copy on the website. The website owner believes the contract was ...


4

I would say keep these in mind and you'll write the compelling headers you need. Persona Who are you writing this for? What do they want to get out of this case study. Use headings that will empower them to get that info. Hubspot's use in this Best Practices post is excellent - #4 is the headings section. (source) Skimming Know that very few readers are ...


4

While I haven't done exactly what you're doing, I've often needed to format two side-by-side sections that are in precise vertical positions. Formatting for two columns does not work well. It's okay if you're making a brochure, because you don't change it often. But if you're writing and editing a story, you'll constantly have to futz with it. The ...


3

I am not a lawyer. But in school I did have a class entitled "engineering and the law" taught jointly by a lawyer and an engineering prof. They said that if there is a contract, the owner is as specified in the contract (normally the client). If the contract doesn't address the issue, the copyright resides with the author. If the client paid the author, ...


3

One good way to answer the question is to cite how I billed for, say, a freelance print ad. I would quote a blanket fee excluding any hourly rate. The reason is I may have the headline in five minutes or it may be five days. Creativity, in short, can't be rushed. I would encourage you to adopt a process I got many years ago from a Depression-era (I think)...


3

No it is not necessary to insure your work before sending it. International law will garantee copyright ownership to the author without any formality. This is stated in the Berne convention in article 5.2, and repeated in the main international treaties on copyright. However, it is necessary to be able to prove that you are the author in casesomeone else ...


3

For anyone ever wondering, I got some solid feedback from two freelancer friends that work in advertising and for advertising freelancers, no matter the discipline or hourly fee dependent on weighting; here's what they advise. If you work on a Friday outside of regular work hours - normal hourly rate. Saturdays - X 1.5 normal hourly rate. Sunday - X 2 It'...


3

You're working in the wrong programs. I haven't used LibreOffice, but Word is a word processing program. It's not a layout program. Write your stories in Word or whatever. Write them in two separate documents and use whatever manual note system you prefer to indicate where content has to align. (Word has a Review tab for this, so adding comments ...


2

I realize this is an old question, but thought I'd mention a couple of things. Note that I am speaking of copyright in the United States and I am not a lawyer. Going through the process to formally copyright a short story is not going to be worth the time, effort, and money (assuming you would want to copyright each story you are writing). The process is ...


2

The short answer is : Be Curious The longer answer requires : Explaining how being curious matters Explaining how to use your curiosity Curious Matters Because: If you're going to sell something you must be truly interested in it If you're going to talk about something you should know every aspect of it. If you're going to sell something that you know ...


2

I would see the double entendre. As an editor, I would change it to something else. Assemble or install, probably. "Install" to me means "Start with all the pieces, put it together, test to make sure it does what it's supposed to do, and clean up the site afterwards." Installing an exhibition would involve putting it into place, and if that required tools, ...


2

The terms you're looking for are sentence case and title case. A number of style guides out there like Chicago Style and APA give different recommendations. APA supports both title case and sentence case for different contexts. For Title Case e.g. used for headings of level 1 and 2, titles of referenced works and in some other contexts, you capitalize all ...


2

Updating a Company Blog Great question! And @Secespitus raises some good points as well. However, I'd like to add a few additional things you might want to consider. Best Practices of Business Blogging In today's atmosphere where everyone is trying to create content to attract as much traffic as they can, the last thing that is needed is more content ...


2

Updates are generally at the beginning, but different styles are possible The thing about updates in texts is that there are different ways you can do them and none of them is correct or incorrect. It mostly depends on your companies culture. Are there examples of how someone did it in the past? Is there a styleguide that dictates certain things so that ...


2

A good thesaurus might help avoid repetition. And for grammar, pick up a copy of the AP Style Guide or Chicago Manual of Style. Or another style guide, if neither of them is appropriate in your area.


2

Try a more formal announcement such as... This site and all of the sites linked to from the "Gallery" page were hand-crafted by Ayadi Ghait. They are under copyright and unauthorized duplication of the underlying source code for reuse is prohibited by the author. ...Throwing in the copyright and usage information dilutes the boastfulness of the first ...


2

This is maybe a question more apt to Workplace.SE, but here's my two cents: I woudn't mention the names of the agencies you're already working for. This for a few reasons: The other agencies may be not happy with that Depending on your country rules and on your contracts, you may disclosing confidential information You don't necessarily want people know ...


1

Repetition is not inherently bad Yes, using the same word over and over again is not a good thing, but repeating a word every once in a while can be a good thing. You might want to repeat certain words or phrases to emphasize their importance and show how certain characters have a certain style. This can help the reader to easily distinguish characters. For ...


1

I understand your confusion, and likely frustration. As some of the answers here indicate, the terms "copy" and "copywriter" are used in a wide variety of environments, and the usage is not always logical. For decades, I've been a copywriter in the field of Marketing Communications. I would describe it as any writing that is done for commercial purposes, ...


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