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Can my protagonist have a nickname like "Harry Potter" or "the muggle Harry Potter"? (again assuming he's not a wizard etc.) Under "common law", which is the basis for most laws in English speaking countries, the concept of the reasonable man determines many things. For plagiarism you have to ask whether a reasonable man would believe that it was copied? ...


1

I am not a lawyer. Copyright violation is often up to human interpretation (not yours) by a judge or jury. They get to decide whether you are stealing a character or not. Chances are, they will decide a lightning bolt scar, round glasses, etc is so unique it can't be anything BUT plagiarism, so they will find you guilty of copyright violation, perhaps ...


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Copyright law varies by country, so there is no simple answer. But if the first thing readers think of after reading the character description is someone else's character... then you are in dangerous territory, and could absolutely be sued for infringement or get a Cease and Desist court order levied against you, among other things.


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Fair Use in the United States states says: ...the fair use of a copyrighted work, including such use by reproduction in copies or phonorecords or by any other means specified by that section, for purposes such as criticism, comment, news reporting, teaching (including multiple copies for classroom use), scholarship, or research, is not an infringement of ...


0

As others intimated you can do pretty much anything you want with ancient / mythological characters. However, what you cannot do is use a representation from a film. e.g. You can use Thor but you must not make him similar to Marvel's Thor as the studio will claim your character is based on their copyrighted character.


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if I were to write fiction with the same characters, same names, Same as the mythology, or the same as recent authors? If it is an ancient text, or even a text out of copyright (like Shakespeare), then you can copy characters and names, you are free to take the characters from Hamlet and write an adventure with them as children, perhaps introducing new side-...


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As others have noted, you have to avoid names. You can't use their world or some specific monsters (no illithids!). Other monsters, like gnolls and orcs, predate D&D and thus are fair game (so to speak). I think the rise of LitRPG shows that plenty of people want to read about game-like worlds, at least as long as you put an interesting twist on it. In ...


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The envelope seems like a lot of work for an unreliable result. Here's a much simpler and more reliable method: E-mail the data to yourself. The mail server's site (e.g. Google's gmail) could guarantee that you had no opportunity to make changes to their data or metadata.


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Warp drives first appeared in science-fiction back in the early nineteen-thirties. As a result warp drives are neither copyright nor trademarked as belonging to Star Trek. Impulse drives is a term coined in the Star Trek franchise. So it may be trademarked by them. Certainly it is more identified with Star Trek. Phasers definitely coined by Star Trek. But ...


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Ideas in of themselves are not intellectual property. What is intellectual property is the expression of your ideas. In other words, the prose text that incorporates them. In fact, the moment you write something is already copyright to you. Frankly it is a complete waste of time to attempt to hang on to your ideas as belonging to yourself. If for no other ...


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