13

El ver mucho y el leer mucho avivan los ingenios de los hombres. (Seeing much and reading much sharpens one's ingenuity.) ~ Miguel de Cervantes Saavedra Your fear of plagiarism is a common anxiety for beginning writers. After you gain experience and confidence in yourself, you will have no problems producing original content, and you'll stop worrying about ...


12

For what it's worth I think what you're trying to do is awesome! As @Surtsey's answer (correctly) points out the work is still copyrighted regardless of the absence of an explicit copyright notice. Assuming US copyright law applies here (you don't mention a locale so apologies if that is incorrect) then, unless some other entity had acquired it, ownership ...


11

You are allowed to reuse ideas, but you are not allowed to reuse exact characters, names, or blocks of text. Let's take The Lord of the Rings as an example. You're not allowed to use the character Gandalf, but you can certainly use a wizardly mentor figure. You can't use Frodo or Sauron, but if you want to have a peace-loving hobbit go on a quest to ...


8

It may be illegal in some parts of the world if the material you're writing can be considered blasphemous or heretical. However in most of the world it would be perfectly fine. Pretty much all mainstream religious texts are old enough to be out of copyright or predate the concept of copyright altogether.


7

The answer to "Has this story idea already been done?" is always yes, regardless of what the idea actually is. Everything's already been done. In your particular case, the one example I can think of immediately is the TV show Once Upon a Time, where anyone who enters the town of Storybrook becomes unable to leave due to mysterious forces (there are probably ...


6

I would avoid directly tying it to any financial transaction with a net profit for you as that may open you up to litigation and would be a big check against you if there is any litigation and you assert "Fair Use" as financial gain is a big red flag. If you want to monetize your writing, you should probably look into creating your own original fiction ...


6

No. A newspaper with moving pictures is an idea, and ideas cannot be copyrighted. The only way you would be infringing on Harry Potter's copyright would be if you included actual characters or locations from it, such as Harry himself or Hogwarts Castle. If your novel takes too many ideas from Harry Potter, you can be sued for plagiarism, but that's an ...


5

Translations are typically considered to have their own copyright protection in addition to the copyright of the original work being translated. This means that you will have to research the copyright status of whatever specific translation you are wanting to derive from, both in the country of its publication and in your own country you intend to publish ...


5

The Arthurian legends are in the public domain. You can use the names, places and storylines as much as you want. To quote this Quora source: Sure you can. Camelot, King Arthur, the Holy Grail and the Round Table are all in the public domain. You can use as much or as little of any of them as you like in whatever story you want to tell. No-one is going to ...


4

if I were to write fiction with the same characters, same names, Same as the mythology, or the same as recent authors? If it is an ancient text, or even a text out of copyright (like Shakespeare), then you can copy characters and names, you are free to take the characters from Hamlet and write an adventure with them as children, perhaps introducing new side-...


4

The premise of a story is not copyright infringement. Here are some known stories that comes to mind: A young male ant falls in love with the princess and has to save the whole colony. (Antz and A Bug's Life) A comet is on collision course with Earth and a team is sent to nuke it. (Armageddon and Deep Impact) A man arrives in a new world looking for ...


4

Names are not copyrighted. However, some can be trademarked. To clarify what that means: a copyright fully protects an entire work of authorship, i.e. a book, movie or work of art. a trademark represents a specific part of your brand or product, and is usually used for names, slogans or logos. (Source) So you cannot legally "copyright" a name, ...


3

you can rename it, or you can use a disclaimer to say that "any connections between names, places, or businessess that actually exsist are entirely coincidental." if it were a bigger company like say, if your characters were going to eat at a McDonalds, that would be one thing, but if there isn't something like that and it isn't very well known, you're right,...


3

Both Ellie and Ruby are curious. Both of them are away from their real home. In all honesty, if those are the only traits they have in common, then it's unlikely that anyone is going to notice any similarity at all. Certainly, this isn't anywhere near enough for you to get in any sort of trouble if you were to publish your book. If your protagonist was also ...


2

Warp drives first appeared in science-fiction back in the early nineteen-thirties. As a result warp drives are neither copyright nor trademarked as belonging to Star Trek. Impulse drives is a term coined in the Star Trek franchise. So it may be trademarked by them. Certainly it is more identified with Star Trek. Phasers definitely coined by Star Trek. But ...


2

As mentioned, the nature of what a Warp Drive does is a scientific possibility and considered a possible near future tech with NASA working on a similar in principle Warp Drive (in Star Trek, the Warp Drive creates a spacial distortion that makes space contract as the ship's bow moves towards it and expand as it moves astern. Thus, you do not violate FTL ...


2

Copyright law varies by country, so there is no simple answer. But if the first thing readers think of after reading the character description is someone else's character... then you are in dangerous territory, and could absolutely be sued for infringement or get a Cease and Desist court order levied against you, among other things.


2

This question addresses what I think you should do (not whether or not you can legally publish). Make every effort you can to contact people who might care about the ms. That would be his family first, if you can find them. A google search finds several organizations devoted to submariners. Here's one: http://www.isausa.org/ . They might be interested in ...


2

Every idea in fiction has been used to some extent a bunch of times. I've thought of ideas and had them be in Percy Jackson specifically, actually, also (so I feel your pain). Personally, I say you're fine. You reference Hindu gods, first of all, which, to my understanding, are very different from Greek, Egyptian, or any gods Rick Riordan has used in his ...


2

Pretty much meaningless. Most books can be cut a lot more than 50% to get all that is useful for NF, or needed to understand for fiction. If you got 50% then just translate the best 50%. You may only need 20% to get what you want from it. Who did the limitation? The author or the publisher? A publisher may think they can make more money with a ...


2

If by "material from another religion" you mean direct quotations from their texts or scriptures (e.g. a Jehovah's Witnesses tract, or a recent Bible translation), then you'll need to be aware of copyright laws. Large quotations might need explicit permission, while short paragraphs will be allowed if a proper citation is given. If you are simply taking ...


2

Copyright works somewhat differently depending on jurisdiction, and we can't give legal advice here, but this is a rough summary of how it tends to work: If someone translates a copyrighted work, the translation has its own copyright which belongs to the translator. However, because the translation is a derivative work of the original, the copyright holder ...


2

It's certainly been done before, but without knowing the details, it's hard to say whether your changes are big enough. Find some beta readers who don't know your connection to the fandom and ask them to read your stories. If you get feedback that the story/characters etc. remind them of the original story, you might need to make further changes.


2

It is not clear from your question what the source of the risk is. If the risk is that your beta reader(s) (in another country) will convert the material for their own use, you could enter into a formal contract with them. That may not provide much relief in as much as the claim would be international in nature. The only thing that you can do is to pick ...


2

The answer to this question very much depends on your jurisdiction and what kind of artistic theft you intend to prevent. In terms of protecting your writings themselves from being plagiarized by the native English speaker, there are a variety of ways of proving you wrote the text first. In terms of the native English speaker "stealing your idea" whatever ...


2

Option 1 is the most widely used approach. As a fellow programming enthusiast, the typical way I've seen this done is to Clearly spell out somewhere in the introduction that "all code samples contained in this work are licensed under [x] license." Include a copy of the license in the appendix or on the copyright page, or provide a link to a ...


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