7 votes

Can I use more specific monsters and creatures legally?

As I see it, "metallic dragon" is just a description like "stone dragon" or "green dragon". I don't see how that description can be copyrighted. But "mind[f]layer&...
Ben's user avatar
  • 5,289
5 votes

How do I protect my future rights when approaching a publisher with a completed short story?

Well, usually magazines buy only first publishing rights + limited anthology rights. So you don't have to protect anything because that's all they want. If you're finding magazines that say they want ...
ShadowOfHassen's user avatar
5 votes

Is my story too much like Harry Potter?

It doesn't matter if you get compared to Harry Potter. There have been many, many stories about a magical school, and there have been since Harry Potter, such as "The Magicians", which was ...
Amadeus's user avatar
  • 101k
4 votes

Would this be a copyright issue?

I had an idea for a book like Brown Bear, Brown Bear, What Do You See? (by Eric Carle)... Ideas cannot be copyrighted. The book and its sequels use predictable, repetitive text which is a common in ...
wetcircuit's user avatar
  • 27.2k
3 votes

Do I need to ask real locations' permission to use them in my story?

If by a "place" you mean a city, state, country, etc, then no. No one owns the name "Texas" that you could get permission from if you tried. If by a "place" you mean an ...
Jay's user avatar
  • 25.6k
3 votes

Is my story too much like Harry Potter?

My story is set in a magical world hidden within our own, and it has many magical version of things we do. So was Sabrina the Teenage Witch (comics debut 1962), Men In Black (comics debut 1990), and ...
hszmv's user avatar
  • 13.5k
2 votes

Is it copyright infringement if my character is pretty similar to another character?

Not to be pedantic, copyright infringement is a determination made by a court. A question of fact for a jury or judges -- depending upon the jurisdiction. This is an important detail. Just drawing ...
EDL's user avatar
  • 11.7k
2 votes

Applying copyright for book with photos

When we register a book for copyright, do we need to apply for separate copyright registration for the photos in the book? YES, they are separate Text and photographs are separate applications (...
wetcircuit's user avatar
  • 27.2k
2 votes

How can I know if my character name is already taken? If it is, can I use the same name?

Names cannot be copyrighted, but they can be trademarked. You could have a character named Clark Kent in your story. That wouldn't be a problem. The more your Clark resembles Superman's alter-ego the ...
EDL's user avatar
  • 11.7k
2 votes

Posting Poetry by Deceased Persons

In the United States, the Copyright Act of 1977 asserts that the copyright of works written by people who died in the 1920s expired in the 1990s. That means the works are in the public domain and you ...
EDL's user avatar
  • 11.7k
2 votes

Seeking advice on safeguarding my manuscript

No respectable publisher or agent will steal your story or ideas, because if this came out no one would ever want to work with them again and they would be out of business. You will find more answers ...
Ben's user avatar
  • 5,289
2 votes

Copyright question?

I did some research and could not find a suitable link or copyright case. Children's book publishing subdivides into reading levels. The youngest category is called Pre-emergent Readers – under 5 ...
wetcircuit's user avatar
  • 27.2k
2 votes

Can I name characters after characters in another work of fiction, or is that going to lead to copyright issues?

While names cannot be copyrighted, they can be trademarked. You would have to research if that is the case for the names you want to use. You can use trademarked names in a novel (e.g. your character ...
Ben's user avatar
  • 5,289
1 vote

Am I legally allowed to expand someone else's short story into a novel?

You should consult a lawyer. Generally, you cannot expand a short story into a novel. You are infinging on the author's copyright if you do so. If, on the other hand, your own work is "...
Ben's user avatar
  • 5,289
1 vote

I have a character that has a slightly similar name to a title of a book. Do I have to change it even though it’s spelled completely different?

Character names cannot be copyrighted. You could name a character Harry Potter if you wanted to, providing that character and their universe had no resemblance the worlds created by J.K. Rowling. If ...
EDL's user avatar
  • 11.7k
1 vote

Legality of screenshots from TV commercials

Fair Use Rule of Copyright This sounds like fair use: Quoting: "Section 107 of the Copyright Act of 1986 (17 U.S. Code § 107) states that fair use of copyrighted material "for purposes such ...
Amadeus's user avatar
  • 101k
1 vote

Can I name characters after characters in another work of fiction, or is that going to lead to copyright issues?

Have you ever read the great but old fashioned science fiction space opera Lensman series, by Edward Elmer Smith, published in magazines from 1934 to 1948 and in somewhat revised book form from 1948 ...
M. A. Golding's user avatar
1 vote

Can I name characters after characters in another work of fiction, or is that going to lead to copyright issues?

Character names can't be copyrighted. Trademark is a different subject, but that doesn't necessarily apply to writing a novel. With regard to copyright, you can certainly write a Star Trek based novel ...
EDL's user avatar
  • 11.7k
1 vote

Is it copyright infringement if my character is pretty similar to another character?

I wouldn't worry too much if your characters still have notable differences. If you're worried about your character being too similar to another one, just change it. Say your protagonist is a farmer ...
Wyvern123's user avatar
  • 1,695
1 vote
Accepted

Can I publish a collection of poetry that alludes to other authors such as Shakespeare and Wordsworth without violating copyright?

Shakespeare's works will be in the public domain. For other authors, you'll probably need to research each one. @user482877's comment gives you a good link for understanding how it works. You'll want ...
Terri Simon's user avatar
  • 1,830
1 vote

Can I use more specific monsters and creatures legally?

Pathfinder 2E remaster is going away from the chromatic/metallic dragon scheme that the system inherited from D&D, and the reason I usually hear given for it is copyright. While many other OGL-...
T.E.D.'s user avatar
  • 1,289
1 vote

How can I know if my character name is already taken? If it is, can I use the same name?

This is an interesting case because your Mega Man (who debuted in 1981-2) pre-dates Capcom's Mega Man (who debuted in 1987). IANAL, but I think that as long as you can prove that in court if necessary,...
F1Krazy's user avatar
  • 10.8k
1 vote

Recreating public domain children's stories and using the original illustration?

First, you didn't say what country you are in. Very important. In USA if the illustrations came from a book published in the USA before 1927, you almost certainly have nothing to worry about. If the ...
idiotprogrammer's user avatar
1 vote

Recreating public domain children's stories and using the original illustration?

I am not a lawyer, but I believe the answer is NO, they will not have rights to the illustrations. Publishing something using public domain material does not change the public domain status of THAT ...
Amadeus's user avatar
  • 101k
1 vote

Do I need to ask real locations' permission to use them in my story?

As the author, you don't need to be concerned with obtaining permission to use the name of a city, building, or whatever. This is a concern for a publisher -- which might be you if you self-publish. ...
EDL's user avatar
  • 11.7k
1 vote

Is it a copyright violation to quote another book in my book?

TL;DR: What you're describing is considered transformative work. As such, you're not doing anything obviously illegal, and you can set aside legal questions to deal with in the editing and publishing ...
Danica Stone's user avatar
1 vote

Is it a copyright violation to quote another book in my book?

It might be violating copyright. Just giving credit to the original author does not cover you. They own the right to their words, especially identifiable phrases (unless you can find those phrases in ...
Amadeus's user avatar
  • 101k
1 vote

How is AI treated in terms of copyright?

Basically, it's MY scene. So given this, would it be copyright to use some/or all parts of that AI's response? The US copyright Office has not changed it's position on non-human authors (machine or ...
wetcircuit's user avatar
  • 27.2k
1 vote

How is AI treated in terms of copyright?

I am not a lawyer, this is not legal advice. The current legal framework in the USA generally attributes copyright to human authors who exercise creativity, skill and judgment in creating a work. AI ...
Amadeus's user avatar
  • 101k
1 vote

Publishing copyright with regard to novels and comics

When you "sell" your novel to a publisher, you are settling the rights to publish that text, in specific language, into a specific market, like English language rights in North America. ...
EDL's user avatar
  • 11.7k

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