10

Before you sign anything, read Kristine Kathryn Rusch's series on "Dealbreakers" -- clauses which, if they are in your contract, should make you walk away from the deal. For example, here's one about agents and the contracts you make with them. She doesn't seem to have a handy link where you can read the entire series, but this link comes close: http://...


7

Adapted from my answer to Can I self-publish a book on the Kindle store when I'm under 18? Absolutely, whenever you publish something with multiple authors—whether it's a collaboration or a work where a primary author(s) uses someone else's material—you want a written contract. My suggestion in your case is that one of you (probably you) is the primary ...


7

If you are both publishing independently, then it doesn't much matter. Write up a contract spelling out everything, you both sign two copies, and Bob's your uncle. Examples of "everything": John Smith (hereafter "Author") is the creator of the SchmoopyWorld setting, environs, and characters (hereafter "Universe"). Copyright belongs to him, his assigns, and ...


4

I think it is absolutely wise. Any sorts of legal complications can arise and it's always best to be in the clear. I wrote up a contract with a close friend of mine adapting her work (basically making me her agent as well as granting separate use of her characters). Relationships and situations can change.


3

Adapted from my contract: For the following projects: “Possession” (ongoing digital comic series + trade print collections) El Cadejo agrees that the COPYRIGHTS for the above named PROPERTY(including all images and manuscripts) shall be split 50/50 with [Collaborator]. Any rights to manufacture, sell, reproduce, distribute, transmit, broadcast, cable ...


3

I agree with Cloudchaser's answer. Because one book has the potential to increase the sales of another, you might want to let the first publisher know that you have any title coming out under the same pseudonym. If you're having a publisher publish pseudonymous works, your agreement should specify under what conditions the publisher can reveal your ...


3

You don't have many options open to you—and some options are rather extreme. Write your articles and let them make the changes they want. Write your articles and correct any revisions that annoy you too much. Continue to express to your concerns and hope the situation improves. Drum up support on social media, or elsewhere (perhaps among other authors who ...


3

In some cases you can terminate the transfer of copyright and get your rights back. For works published after 1978, the termination start date would commence 35 years after publication, and you can initiate this process in the decade before this 35 year mark. https://rightsback.org/ Some contracts are written to have different termination procedures, so ...


2

It will depend on the terms of your contract. Try consulting a contract lawyer and look it over.


2

Generally speaking, any work/time/materials you are going to create for a company should be contract signed first. Signing them "later" should be a clear sign that something may not be right. Being that this is for a game, most of the time you would have needed to sign things such as a non-disclosure agreement (NDA). They wouldn't want you to take their ...


2

It's best to work out the terms for you guys now, as the comic book industry has all sorts of legal issues stemming from how characters were acquired as well as industry rules. Ever wonder why Wonder Girl wasn't in the first season cartoon of Young Justice despite her being a core member of the team? D.C. was in the middle of a legal nightmare with the ...


2

Note that there are two cases ou have to distinguish: characters that were made by some creator for you as part of a paid contract or hire. characters that you were allowed to use by the original creator based on some contract. Type 1 characters are Works Made for Hire and as you hired them, you hold the copyright. You can make whatever derivatives you ...


1

I agree with El Cadejo, it is always wise to have a contract in place. This covers you legally (and to some degree ethically) if: You have a falling out with one of your subjects who wants to pull their work. A subject doesn't like your interpretation of her/his words and claims you never had permission to use them. A publisher requires this in the future* ...


1

There are three possibilities: Your contract addresses this issue. Follow it. If you're not sure, ask a lawyer. Your contract does not address this issue. Go ask for permission. You somehow wrote a biography without a contract. Go ask for permission. The next question is permission from whom: There's the copyright holder first of all. That's probably ...


1

IANAL but you really need to check what your contract for the biography says: you might hold the license to make the biography, but you do not hold the copyright to the life of the singer. You might need to negotiate.


1

Some places said that you could just type it in a different font, one different from the above line where it says to type your name. I tried this, but when it converted to an email, it went back to a standard font. Since I wanted to do this right, as it was my first time, I went to a computer with a touch screen, signed my name with a stylus, and sent it ...


1

There are two issues, the copyright registration, and the contract. First Make sure the copyright is registered to you. Right away, before you finish reading the answer. Now! The second is the contract, if verbal is still there. In writing notify your publisher that you are terminating all rights to future publication of your works and that you are ...


1

If you have a contact at the publisher you could start by asking directly; but it sounds like you've been down that road. You could easily get the run-around here or talk to someone who has not the power to do what they may feel is a good idea. Business practices want to hoard IP, not release it. If you have an agent, have a conversation and see if you can ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible