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21

The easiest way is to have someone say the name while looking at the animal and having a frame in your comic where the animal is the center. If you have an animal that plays the role that cats play in our real world for example you could have someone angrily say "Get the damn qutie from our table!" with a frame where this person is getting a water spray ...


20

This has been handled a few ways in comics: Have the text in word balloons be a translation of the original, with a footnote indicating "translated from other-language-name". You can graphically remind the user of this as you go along by having the other language be in a different typeface, have the word balloons be a different color than usual, or a ...


19

Every artist should defend their vision of their world, but sometimes compromises have to be made. Is publication the most important thing at the moment? If not, you could hold off for a publisher who appreciates your vision, but if it is it could just be one of those things - you can look forward to television interviews where you say "ah, yes, I did that ...


12

As I understand it, then: The editor has said that if you don't have your character wear a hoodie, he will not publish your comic book. You have tried to talk him out of this and he won't budge. So you have three choices: Give in to the editor's wishes despite your opinion that this hurts the story. Find another publisher. This is not easy, and I'm ...


11

I think I know where your Editor got the idea for the "Hoodie Stealth": Assassin's Creed is currently pretty big business in the gaming world, and the next chapter in the series, Origins, is releasing next week. In pretty much all of these games, the defining characteristic of the main character is that they wear a hoodie. In the most recent chapter, ...


8

Many online comics are made entirely by one person. Take a look, for example, at Order of the Stick. Other comics have a writer, an artist to do the inking, another artist for the colours, and yet another artist for the lettering. All options in between are also viable, and are done by various webcomics. The most common setup I see, other than the Jack-of-...


7

The simplest answer is that there has to be something which bridges the divide between master and slave and allows them to see and respect one another as equals. Does she show mercy to the slave whom her slave has defeated? Does he disable rather than kill his opponents, or dispatch them quickly and without pain? Did she acquire him and thereby save him from ...


6

You have two choices that I can see, and which one you use will likely be dependent on the amount of foreign-language copy you have versus the amount of space you have in the panel to display it: 1) Write the foreign language in the speech balloon with asterisks. The asterisks refer to a footnote at the bottom of the panel translating the text. I think this ...


6

A comic -- web or paper, cartoon strip or sophisticated graphic novel -- is a different medium from conventional written stories. The biggest difference is that it's hard to do exposition; those long explanatory passages that you could slip into a novel don't fit into a few panels. It's also hard to convey nuances like meaningful gazes. So think about the ...


6

Have a "Cast of Characters" line up at the beginning showing all your characters with their names and include the creature(s) in some typical pose such as sitting on their owner's shoulder. You can also introduce dynamic by having an antagonistic character (if any) scowling or something at the creature on the other character's shoulder.


5

It makes a huge difference that it's a comic. Seeing the visual cue of how the character is drawn will go 90% of the way towards dispelling any confusion, particularly if we only see child Lais and adult Lace. It is possible to have a written text with similar or identical names and have it be a plot point, like V.C. Andrews's My Sweet Audrina, but you ...


5

There is a story that in the early days of Fonzi from Happy Days, a network exec said he wanted The Fonz to lose his leather jacket cause it made him look like a punk. The head writer agreed, but on condition that Fonzi could use the outfit if he was on his motorcycle, because it's legit safety equipment and they didn't want to have people dying in bike ...


5

The X-Files Approach Your protagonist has a secret friend in the bad guys organization who sends him cryptic hints and clues. The Classic Batman Approach (also known as the 007 Approach) The bad guy is so arrogant that he tells the whole plan to your protagonist while trying to kill the hero in an elaborate and inefficient way. Then walks away, allowing ...


5

A superhero team is first of all a team. You might therefore find the question How to write a story about a team? useful. With that in hand, you must also determine whether your team are all superheroes, or there's just the one superhero and the rest are regular people. If your team is a team of superheroes, their superpowers, like their traits, should ...


4

No one can really answer this for you, it's about what trade-offs you are personally willing to make. This request sounds ridiculous and off-the-wall the way you described it, but it's the publisher's job to know the market, and maybe he's correct that the "Hoodied Hunter" would be a huge success. Paul Simon's producer didn't even ask him before he edited ...


4

Seems like almost any combination of {Season,Volume,Book}# - {Episode/Chapter/Issue}# is fine. You could choose to restart the smaller number or not. Even TV shows have a mix from what I've seen, though netflix appears to retcon all of them to Season X / Episode 1 (starting from 1 for each season). I've at minimum seen television play with all of these. ...


4

Any adaptation is perhaps best thought of as a new work inspired by the original. Different media has different strengths and weaknesses, and you won't produce good work by just copying from one medium to another. Comic strips convey a lot through the visuals, and they have comparatively tiny amounts of writing as compared to a novel. My best advice to you ...


4

What you need first is a market. Who are you publishing comics for and how will you pay for it? Lots of people create comics anthologies, for example. These are very popular and can be published as e-books or printed books or both. You can do this as print-on-demand or you can print a lot of copies and use a distributor (harder). Or just stick to e-...


3

I'd highly recommend simply italicizing and using a script-like font to differentiate between the special language and the common language. The first time this is done, you can denote the difference by using an asterisk note within the speech bubble itself, and then simply alternate between the italicized script and your normal font afterwards. This approach ...


3

Your editor sounds like an idiot and non-professional. If all characters wear hoodies as part of their costume, are they all always sneaking? What is the difference between a hoodie and a Halloween mask, or painting the face entirely bright blue, or wearing a ski mask? That makes no sense, and even if they have money, dealing with people that refuse to see ...


3

Definitely check out www.createspace.com That is Amazon's selfpublishing hardcopy arm. They have the sizes you are looking for and you can get your printed items done very inexpensively. You can calculate your cost before you ever try the service if you go to: https://www.createspace.com/Products/Book/?sitesearch_query=calculate%20cost&...


3

It seems your publisher and you are miscommunicating, because you are looking at the same thing from different perspectives. You are thinking in terms of the internal logic of your story or world. He is thinking in terms of customer expectations and shared visual language. Try to find a common language to resolve this dispute. That would usually be his ...


3

The other answers outlined the basic methods and hopefully you've already used one of them in your story. Another possibility is that the protagonist works in an industry that the bad guys require to carry out their plans. A piano moving company that is asked to move a strange box. The right size and weight for a piano, but the wrong shape. A police ...


3

There are a number of different directions that one could take a superhero team, each with their own unique personalities. That said, a good starting point, one which many superhero teams leverage, are an "idealist" and a "realist". As people with extraordinary abilities, we should be held to an extraordinary standard. We have gifts, and it's our duty to ...


3

individual issues 50¢ eBook ~ $2 printed book in stores ~ $5 direct sale ~ $7+ I'm not sure how helpful this will be, but starting with observations. Your marketing should focus on the one type of sale you can control: direct to buyer. This is your "luxury" or "gift" market. Try to think of ways to get people to buy a copy for their friend. Perks can ...


2

scene (notes to the illustrator) action (notes to the illustrator) dialog You know, this sounds like a script, so write a script, nothing more, nothing less.


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