22

This sounds like Google Docs, perhaps combined with Trello (for the Kanban board and calendar view), would do for you. It's got live updating -- I don't think it tracks edits by author exactly, so you could agree on a convention -- like my students on one team devised a rule where each of them owned 2 colors. (4 students, so like light blue and dark blue ...


15

For fiction that can accommodate different POVs, dividing those up per author not only addresses this problem but can be a feature. For cases where you want a unified voice, if you can't get a tough editor like Lauren Ipsum suggested, try having the authors edit each other's sections. In technical-writing teams I've found that this drives the material ...


13

The first step is to work out some style guidelines among yourselves. Agree on what style you want the finished product to follow. Because this is a project among friends rather than, say, a corporate publication, you'll probably end up including aspects of each writer's style while moving the whole thing toward a compromise center. Once you agree on what ...


11

If you want to unify the voices: Get a tough editor. Explain to him/her that you have two authors and you want to standardize their voices. You might pick a passage or a chapter which particularly reflects both writers, and say "make it all sound like that." Then be prepared to have a whole chunk of everything rewritten. ETA: Examples of things which ...


11

I would say yes, you can convert your roleplay into a novel. But it won't necessarily be easy. If you think you'll just be able to copy and paste your written roleplay session into a single document, give it a few tweaks and hey presto, you have a novel, then I'm afraid you'll probably be disappointed. A novel has a lot of structure that your free form ...


10

I use git for version control, and it's terrific for writing projects. I've used GitHub to share work in progress while collaborating with a friend. We wrote plain text files in markdown format. GitHub also has an Issues tracker that can easily be used to assign, accept, and track individual tasks. My friend and I didn't need that to collaborate, but I'...


10

Don't over-complicate things. You are an Author. "Authored by _." It would make more sense for you to write, "As told by (grandmother's name). Translated by (daughter's name). Authored by (your name)." Use an introduction to tell how this story came to be, which will explain each of your roles and your motivations.


9

I'd go with "Edited by." You are not the author (the originator). You took existing work and edited it to make it readable. I think "edited" makes your relationship to the work clear.


9

The previous answers have covered the major points, but there is one more, slightly more subtle issue with converting role play to fiction... the feelings of your role play players. Each of them is the hero in their own story and each of them have complex reasons for every decision which they made during any given quest. When, in service to your story's ...


8

Only tool I can think of would be Google docs. You can have multiple people writing in a document at the same time and see where their cursor is, there is no color coding on who's typing by default. You can enter what's called "suggestion mode" where changes you add are not validated immediately but merely appear highlighted to your color, allowing the ...


7

There seem to be two general approaches to this: One person writes the work, and the other starts revising it heavily. There might be significant problems that the second author needs to address. There might be significant expansion of the work. Both authors agree on a general outline or plan, and they map out the work, indicating who will write the first ...


7

I don't think length per se is a problem in your examples. It's more the monotony of the repeated three-part structure. Here some ideas for varying the structure. Varying Length and Structure. First, break down your sentences into individual propositions--teeny, tiny sentences, each of which makes a single claim. Like this: She touched him. (implied by ...


7

Outline the book so the work can be broken up and worked on in individual pieces. Use Google Docs with a shared folder (can be shared with specific Google users by user id) Those two things should get you there because Google Docs will even allow multiple users to edit a document at the same time and show the live edits (in real-time) which are done by each ...


7

I would recommend two rounds of edits, for each author. If the friends are A, B, C (Ariel, Bethany, Cindy) then: 1) First Round: A->B->C->A. Ariel makes edit notes for Bethany, Bethany makes edit notes for Cindy, and Cindy makes edit notes for Ariel. Then each person gets their edit notes, and the author of the chapter makes changes if they want, or gets ...


6

My own habit is to use either Dropbox or Google docs to store what I refer to as "lore files." Each file contains all current details for a particular category: cities, characters, items, species. When making a minor change, the files are changed directly. If it is a major change or addition, it is added to a discussion file, to be added later. Before ...


6

The border between Metilda and Lauren's answers is fuzzy and depends on how much of editing you did. If you took the story nearly verbatim, translated it, polished rough edges, added some preface and made it a smooth reading, you're the editor. If you retold that story, say, changing POV, making a set of memories into a smoothly flowing novel leaving no ...


6

Based on all the info in your question: almost nowhere. You aren't going to get somebody to write books based on your ideas/guidance, with you listed as the main (or only) author [definition of ghostwriter], unless you are famous or have deep pockets (i.e., hefty payment up-front). The lone exception might be the person who posted a question on here about ...


6

The only works that are truly original are by people who've never had any contact with other people. Every work has inspiration from other works, or ideas that are present in other places. Many excellent works don't even have novel plots. As for legal repercussions, "ideas" are not protected by law. Only the expression of the idea is protected by copyright. ...


6

Adapted from my answer to Can I self-publish a book on the Kindle store when I'm under 18? Absolutely, whenever you publish something with multiple authors—whether it's a collaboration or a work where a primary author(s) uses someone else's material—you want a written contract. My suggestion in your case is that one of you (probably you) is the primary ...


6

At my publishing company, we would ask well-known preachers to read our book then write something for the introduction or just a review for the back cover. I don't believe any of them were paid, but seeing as they were friends of my boss and ultimately not in it for the money, that would be why. I would offer them a flat fee if they are someone you ...


5

I'm in agreement with John Smithers here: the issue seems to be that you don't know enough about the character, so K needs to supply as much detail as possible for you to start with. Perhaps write a questionnaire for K to answer as if you were interviewing Garlic. This is an old technique, but it could help you get answers to fundamental things you want/need ...


5

If you are programmers, then why not use the same tools you use in your day job? Trello may meet your needs.


5

When your authors began working with their respective agents, they would have had to sign a contract explaining the bounds of the agency. That contract will explain the ins and outs for common situations such as dual representation, entering markets outside the agent's bailiwick, and so forth. I would be surprised if 'Collaborative Works' wasn't mentioned ...


5

Another suggestion would be to use some sort of distributed source control system to keep track of the changes that you each make. Dropbox Dropbox has built in source control, so you can roll back to previous changes, and it is fairly simple to use. Their Terms of Service kind of trouble me, but I may have donned my tinfoil hat in recent years. Benefits ...


5

The first step I would suggest is to develop a timeline and then place your characters on that timeline. It would be better if each of you is writing from the perspective of a different character, because then you wouldn't have to worry so much about what the other person is writing. It would also help to periodically exchange content so that you can see ...


5

I'll go ahead and do some examples, using yours. He leaned into her touch, watching her with a content smile on his face. rewrite: A content smile spread over his face as he leaned into her touch. rewrited: Contented now, he smiled as he leaned into her touch. He gritted his teeth slightly, pouring the hot water into his cup as he felt his cheeks heating. ...


5

According to copyright laws, the artist has the right to sell reprints of the art. It is important to know that copyright nearly always rests with the artist, regardless of who owns the artwork. There are exceptions to this rule, such as work that has been specifically commissioned or completed during employment, in which case copyright stays with ...


5

I have heard of, and seen, such a thing—although I can't think of a specific book at the moment. It certainly doesn't seem odd at all, especially if each author does want to express themself separately. It would take the form of an "Acknowledgements" page with "Author A would like to thank . . .," followed by "Author B would like to that . . ." The same ...


5

There is a major difference between a roleplay and a novel, in their standard forms. A roleplay has many characters, each of them is the protagonist. In a roleplay nobody can overwhelm the other, it takes away the fun. A novel usually has only one main character [1], and the others are satellites - even if the novel is huge and complex such as The Lord of ...


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