22

This sounds like Google Docs, perhaps combined with Trello (for the Kanban board and calendar view), would do for you. It's got live updating -- I don't think it tracks edits by author exactly, so you could agree on a convention -- like my students on one team devised a rule where each of them owned 2 colors. (4 students, so like light blue and dark blue ...


13

The first step is to work out some style guidelines among yourselves. Agree on what style you want the finished product to follow. Because this is a project among friends rather than, say, a corporate publication, you'll probably end up including aspects of each writer's style while moving the whole thing toward a compromise center. Once you agree on what ...


11

I would say yes, you can convert your roleplay into a novel. But it won't necessarily be easy. If you think you'll just be able to copy and paste your written roleplay session into a single document, give it a few tweaks and hey presto, you have a novel, then I'm afraid you'll probably be disappointed. A novel has a lot of structure that your free form ...


9

The previous answers have covered the major points, but there is one more, slightly more subtle issue with converting role play to fiction... the feelings of your role play players. Each of them is the hero in their own story and each of them have complex reasons for every decision which they made during any given quest. When, in service to your story's ...


8

Only tool I can think of would be Google docs. You can have multiple people writing in a document at the same time and see where their cursor is, there is no color coding on who's typing by default. You can enter what's called "suggestion mode" where changes you add are not validated immediately but merely appear highlighted to your color, allowing the ...


7

I don't think length per se is a problem in your examples. It's more the monotony of the repeated three-part structure. Here some ideas for varying the structure. Varying Length and Structure. First, break down your sentences into individual propositions--teeny, tiny sentences, each of which makes a single claim. Like this: She touched him. (implied by ...


7

Outline the book so the work can be broken up and worked on in individual pieces. Use Google Docs with a shared folder (can be shared with specific Google users by user id) Those two things should get you there because Google Docs will even allow multiple users to edit a document at the same time and show the live edits (in real-time) which are done by each ...


7

I would recommend two rounds of edits, for each author. If the friends are A, B, C (Ariel, Bethany, Cindy) then: 1) First Round: A->B->C->A. Ariel makes edit notes for Bethany, Bethany makes edit notes for Cindy, and Cindy makes edit notes for Ariel. Then each person gets their edit notes, and the author of the chapter makes changes if they want, or gets ...


7

Adapted from my answer to Can I self-publish a book on the Kindle store when I'm under 18? Absolutely, whenever you publish something with multiple authors—whether it's a collaboration or a work where a primary author(s) uses someone else's material—you want a written contract. My suggestion in your case is that one of you (probably you) is the primary ...


6

The only works that are truly original are by people who've never had any contact with other people. Every work has inspiration from other works, or ideas that are present in other places. Many excellent works don't even have novel plots. As for legal repercussions, "ideas" are not protected by law. Only the expression of the idea is protected by copyright. ...


6

I'll go ahead and do some examples, using yours. He leaned into her touch, watching her with a content smile on his face. rewrite: A content smile spread over his face as he leaned into her touch. rewrited: Contented now, he smiled as he leaned into her touch. He gritted his teeth slightly, pouring the hot water into his cup as he felt his cheeks heating. ...


6

At my publishing company, we would ask well-known preachers to read our book then write something for the introduction or just a review for the back cover. I don't believe any of them were paid, but seeing as they were friends of my boss and ultimately not in it for the money, that would be why. I would offer them a flat fee if they are someone you ...


5

I wrote all this before I understood that the desired focus was on video games specifically: I don't know a lot about story writing for video games or coding, but I do have experience with collaborative writing and I expect writing for video games is similar to other collaborative projects, like movies, TV shows, musical theater, etc. The first division of ...


5

According to copyright laws, the artist has the right to sell reprints of the art. It is important to know that copyright nearly always rests with the artist, regardless of who owns the artwork. There are exceptions to this rule, such as work that has been specifically commissioned or completed during employment, in which case copyright stays with ...


5

I have heard of, and seen, such a thing—although I can't think of a specific book at the moment. It certainly doesn't seem odd at all, especially if each author does want to express themself separately. It would take the form of an "Acknowledgements" page with "Author A would like to thank . . .," followed by "Author B would like to that . . ." The same ...


5

There is a major difference between a roleplay and a novel, in their standard forms. A roleplay has many characters, each of them is the protagonist. In a roleplay nobody can overwhelm the other, it takes away the fun. A novel usually has only one main character [1], and the others are satellites - even if the novel is huge and complex such as The Lord of ...


5

I am currently publishing a comic series with a co-writer, and have worked with other writers as well. We always start with a general outline, so that both of us are in agreement regarding what direction the plot is going to take and how the characters are going to advance it. Typically we each follow our own self-created characters and their story arcs, ...


5

Another alternative (if you are not afraid to use LaTeX) would be Overleaf. While a learning curve exists you can layout documents beautifully with it. I come from an engineering background where special characters and formulas are needed on a regular basis. We used Overleaf within our team to work on several parts of our document simultaneously. Not for ...


4

Two authors divide duties, not content One very successful technique was the one used by Fletcher Pratt and L. Sprague de Camp in their wonderful fantasy romps such as Land of Unreason and The Incomplete Enchanter. Pratt, at the time the much more experienced and accomplished of the two, would rough out a plot. They would bounce it back and forth until it ...


4

A supplement to this answer: All the shared-world anthologies I've read had "framing" stories written by the primary author, the one who came up with most of the setting and is driving the process. For example, Eric Flint wrote or co-wrote several of the 1632 novels, including the first one, and Robert Asprin was heavily involved in the Thieves' World ...


4

You are looking for a co-writer. There are websites where you can find a partner for your project (e.g. co-writers.com). If you think are good with plot, structure and editing, you could look for somebody to bring in the literary depth. However, have you tried different ways of writing your fiction yet? If you get impatient, you may want to try writing your ...


4

Depending on your requirements, something more lightweight like etherpad might fit your needs. It offers basic formatting functionality like headings, bold and italic. It's very customizable and if you host it yourself you don't have to give your data to any external company. You can look here for a demo.


4

Although I don't have experience working with a publisher, “co-brand,” and author, I did work on the flip side of this as part of the publishing company/co-brand. We reprinted seven or eight books by an author who had previously printed them thirty years ago with a different publisher. He still owned the copyright and was able to work with us, without ...


4

If the file format of your word processor is text, such as docx files for MS Word, then you can use Git for document control. Using Github as a remote repository will enable multiple writers to collaborate via the cloud and backup their work. There are other options, Google Documents provides versioning and label, which provides a minimum sort of version ...


3

It sounds like you're starting out on the wrong foot. To produce a successful book, it's important that you foster a spirit of collaboration and contribution with your co-author. One way to do this is to have an agreement up front. The agreement should state that both of your names will appear alphabetically on the cover, it should include a preliminary ...


3

You can approach this from two directions: DIY, as outlined in Monica's answer. Use basic XML tools and the DITA Open Toolkit. Up-front cost can be low, but expect to spend a lot of time getting it to work the way you want. Support for content reuse will be minimal. Get an integrated solution. The one I know of is Author-it. This combines an authoring ...


3

DITA is an XML format, so any editor or IDE that supports XML will work for you. Options with good XML support range from Eclipse (free) to Oxygen and Epic (several hundred dollars per seat). Of course, anybody who's comfortable getting up close and personal with the XML can use Emacs, vim, or Notepad++, too. (Don't laugh; I write all my XML and HTML in ...


3

Since we never put anything out on a public server, aka Cloud, I don't know if Trelby is what you need or not. On the bright side, it's FREE, so no harm in taking a look to see. I've never heard of Plotbot, but have used Celtx. The number one screenwriting software is Final Draft. It is expensive, crashes often, and not universal among platforms. For this ...


3

What a fascinating concept, Larry! I fully realise that you're probably long past the need for a 'shared world story site' but nonetheless I decided to have a look for my own interest. After a lot of fruitless scrabbling through the far reaches of the internet I finally came across Story Timed, which seems to match your (then) interests and (now) mine. The ...


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