New answers tagged

1

The MLA style guide dictates that you should keep your citation to 40 words or less, but that's purely for stylistic reasons, not legal reasons. Anything longer should be placed in a block quote, not a citation. (Source) When citing a paragraph of a written work on a website, i.e. for an article, the general rule is to only cite what sentences are relevant ...


0

You are going to have to check the style that is used by your university for your subject. Normally, a particular standard that many institutions use is the one you need. Then check the style manual that is relevant e.g. Chicago.


2

Traditionally, the sign for elided words is the ellipsis, which is three dots. Those used to be created with periods. In modern word processing, it is its own symbol. Thus, Trafficking in children from Togo, Nigeria, Mali, to Cote d’Ivoire’s plantation and domestic servants in Gabon, and of women from Ghana, Nigeria, Mali, and Sierra Leone as exploited sex ...


0

You can use the ellipsis sign ... to indicate the part of the sentence you don't want to include in you citation.


4

The cleanest quoting approach would be as follows: "[Trafficking] domestic servants in [Sierra Leone] as exploited sex workers [...] has also taken root" Brackets can be used to show that you've summarized or edited excluded text, not merely removed it. But in this case I'd lean towards paraphrasing, e.g.: Whomever (Whomever et al, 2017) make ...


2

Of course not; not as in your example. You either cite the exact text, or you show how you've changed it. Is that much truly not obvious? That is more, not less important when - as here - the original text is unclear. "Trafficking in children from (anywhere) in countries of the European Union…" is broadly comprehensible only from assumed context, ...


1

Of course. You see this often, when people are citing a speech or another, drawn out text. What you'd see is a normal cite, but in every place something is missing, there's a "[...]" to indicate that you omitted something. In this case, yours would end up being "Trafficking [...] domestic servants [...] from [...] Sierra Leone as exploited sex ...


-2

Yes. You may be putting the information from that sentence into your own words, but you've still taken that information from another source, and you need to cite that source just like any other. Otherwise, as far as anyone knows, "Trafficking domestic servants from Sierra Leone as exploited sex workers in countries of the European Union has also taken ...


Top 50 recent answers are included