20

First off, "grok" is not copyrighted; you can't copyright individual words, even made-up ones. Therefore fair use (a defense against an infringement claim) does not apply. That doesn't mean it's impermissible, in fact it almost certainly is fine. It's also not trademarked, as it is not being used by the Heinlein estate to identify a product or service. And ...


15

You cite a source because it gives additional information that a curious reader may want to follow up on. So: If your prior paper gives additional information (data, methods, background, conclusions, further citations, etc.) that is not in your current paper, but which may be of interest to readers, cite it. By the way, you're not citing yourself; you're ...


13

Format it the same way, with blockquote indents, and if you can add a little dialogue before and after, you don't have to worry about weird quote mark placement. Bilbo stood and cleared his throat. "I have a new poem for you all," he announced. "It goes thus:     All that is gold does not glitter,     Not all those ...


12

David Becker has written about APA citations for pseudonyms. Citing pseudonyms can seem tricky at first, but it becomes much simpler when you take into account one of APA Style’s key mottos: Cite what you see. When it comes to citing an author, cite whatever name is used by the source, whether it be a real name or a pseudonym. For example, The ...


10

Page ranges are normally inclusive. "Pages 1-5" means pages 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5. I think most readers would be extremely confused if you wrote "pages 1-5" and mean 1, 2, 3, and 4. Note that you should include a page in the range even if the relevant text takes up only a small part of the page. Like if the text of interest starts halfway down page 10, takes ...


9

That depends on where the two separate statements come from. If Smith says the price decreases, while Watson says the industry grows, the first one is correct. On the other hand, if both authors note the correlation of price and industry, the second is right. It happens very often that the same statement is contained in more than one article, so you need to ...


8

First, two general principles: Consistency with other publications is useful. Consistency within a publication is also useful. So write a style guide that documents your house style. Your house style does not necessarily have to match the stylization of a wordmark. An acronym is an abbreviation pronounced as a word. Many publications write acronyms with ...


8

You have two choices: Write it up in the same style as the other quotes but don't give an attribution. It is common enough for writers to put something poetic or otherwise different from the main chapter text in the beginning of a chapter. Give a full citation, including the name of the work it came from. If it's unpublished, then it's just the author ...


7

I am not certain if it is what you are looking for, but you can get the xml or unixref formatted citations from DOI on the CrossRef website. Also Connotea is freeware that will produce similar citation formats. If you specifically interested in LaTeX (i.e. BibTeX) formatting, you may be interested in these answers on the TeX site. And on the CrossRef site,...


7

Kindall tackled the legal aspect. As for reception/perception considerations, here's the rule of thumb I'd use: If you're using the same word in the same way for the same thing, and your story is about that thing (or concept, or whatever) - you're crossing the line. That's like saying "I'm writing a story about the same Smeerps Albert J. Jones wrote about," ...


7

I can think of an exercise which might help - although I'm not sure how efficient it would be - if the students would be able to solve it. Chose a set of sources for them and give them a task that forces cross-referencing, comparing and binding them. For example, give the students a task of examining and proving or disproving a claim in source A (which you ...


7

My answer is that you should read widely and then write and cite, because you want the foundation you're building upon to be rock solid. The risk of writing first and inserting later (which is a common approach and easier) is that if you write your paper first, (telling yourself you want the flow of it), you'll find yourself wanting to cherry pick citations (...


6

I know this has an accepted answer, but it's from Billy Bob. The APA Guide has the following to say: When writing an entire paragraph about a single study, introduce that paragraph by stating that you will refer to the same study throughout the paragraph, then cite the reference. This avoids awkwardness and redundancy. And as to indenting, this is ...


6

The MLA has a section on graphic novels. Basically, you cite the source in the same way as a regular non-periodical publication. If it's a single author, yes, you would use (Author, Page) format. See the Purdue OWL online writing lab for details on MLA format. See also this site for specific information on how to form graphic novel citations in your Works ...


6

This is called an indirect (or secondhand) quote. Typically, the advice is to replace it with a primary quote if at all possible. But in an oral recollection like this, it might not be possible to recover the primary source. If possible, I'd suggest NOT placing the putative quotation in quotation marks, which are usually reserved for exact quotes that you ...


6

"Bob Said" is an "attribution". It attributes the spoken words to a particular person. Alternatives include... an "introductory phrese" such as... "According to Bob, " or "Bob reported that " followed by the quote in its entirety. an "introductory sentence" such as... "During a recent interview with Bob, the expert had much to say on the subject of ...


6

According to CMU, you should include the name of the original source in or next to the quote, but "On your references page, you will only list the source you actually read". The MLA, saying "The basic rule is that in both your Works Cited list and in-text citation you will still cite [the author of the direct quote]. [the author of the direct quote] will ...


6

Only cite sources you've actually seen. In this case, it sounds like you have a secondary source (your link) that quotes from and does not cite a primary source. All you can say with certainty is that this secondary source says that primary source says what it does. The way you handle this in your document is to say something like "according to (secondary ...


6

From the MLA Handbook, 8th ed., p. 55: There are circumstances in which a citation like "(Baron 194)" doesn't provide enough information to lead ambiguously to a specific entry. If you borrow from works by more than one author with the same last name (e.g., Naomi Baron and Sabrina Alcorn Baron), eliminate ambiguity in the citation by adding the authors's ...


5

Generally no, you do not need permission from the patent holder to use text from their patent application. "Subject to limited exceptions reflected in 37 CFR 1.71(d) & (e) and 1.84(s) , the text and drawings of a patent are typically not subject to copyright restrictions." The exception referenced within deals with patent apps which themselves contain ...


5

Way back in 10th grade, when we were learning how to do research papers on the back of a coal shovel, our teacher had us take all our notes on 3x5 cards. We had to submit them as part of the grade — she actually went around with a bag and we had to toss in our rubber-banded stack of cards. Edit to clarify: Each card had one note or thought on it: "...


4

No, there is no universally accepted standard for this. That doesn't mean there aren't standards you should follow, though. Usually, the set of required fields is dictated by the journal or conference you are publishing in. Many journals have BibTeX styles that will include the required fields for you (as long as they are present in your library, of course)....


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