13

Format it the same way, with blockquote indents, and if you can add a little dialogue before and after, you don't have to worry about weird quote mark placement. Bilbo stood and cleared his throat. "I have a new poem for you all," he announced. "It goes thus:     All that is gold does not glitter,     Not all those ...


12

David Becker has written about APA citations for pseudonyms. Citing pseudonyms can seem tricky at first, but it becomes much simpler when you take into account one of APA Style’s key mottos: Cite what you see. When it comes to citing an author, cite whatever name is used by the source, whether it be a real name or a pseudonym. For example, The ...


12

You are essentially describing the purposes of Scientific writing. Scientific papers are written citing earlier works and then confirming, developing or possibly refuting them. This is how science works. Your suggestion of doing the same, with technical books replacing scientific papers, is just following the same principles. As long as you give full ...


11

That depends on where the two separate statements come from. If Smith says the price decreases, while Watson says the industry grows, the first one is correct. On the other hand, if both authors note the correlation of price and industry, the second is right. It happens very often that the same statement is contained in more than one article, so you need to ...


10

Page ranges are normally inclusive. "Pages 1-5" means pages 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5. I think most readers would be extremely confused if you wrote "pages 1-5" and mean 1, 2, 3, and 4. Note that you should include a page in the range even if the relevant text takes up only a small part of the page. Like if the text of interest starts halfway down page 10, takes ...


9

First, two general principles: Consistency with other publications is useful. Consistency within a publication is also useful. So write a style guide that documents your house style. Your house style does not necessarily have to match the stylization of a wordmark. An acronym is an abbreviation pronounced as a word. Many publications write acronyms with ...


8

My answer is that you should read widely and then write and cite, because you want the foundation you're building upon to be rock solid. The risk of writing first and inserting later (which is a common approach and easier) is that if you write your paper first, (telling yourself you want the flow of it), you'll find yourself wanting to cherry pick citations (...


8

You have two choices: Write it up in the same style as the other quotes but don't give an attribution. It is common enough for writers to put something poetic or otherwise different from the main chapter text in the beginning of a chapter. Give a full citation, including the name of the work it came from. If it's unpublished, then it's just the author ...


7

I can think of an exercise which might help - although I'm not sure how efficient it would be - if the students would be able to solve it. Chose a set of sources for them and give them a task that forces cross-referencing, comparing and binding them. For example, give the students a task of examining and proving or disproving a claim in source A (which you ...


6

The MLA has a section on graphic novels. Basically, you cite the source in the same way as a regular non-periodical publication. If it's a single author, yes, you would use (Author, Page) format. See the Purdue OWL online writing lab for details on MLA format. See also this site for specific information on how to form graphic novel citations in your Works ...


6

This is called an indirect (or secondhand) quote. Typically, the advice is to replace it with a primary quote if at all possible. But in an oral recollection like this, it might not be possible to recover the primary source. If possible, I'd suggest NOT placing the putative quotation in quotation marks, which are usually reserved for exact quotes that you ...


6

"Bob Said" is an "attribution". It attributes the spoken words to a particular person. Alternatives include... an "introductory phrese" such as... "According to Bob, " or "Bob reported that " followed by the quote in its entirety. an "introductory sentence" such as... "During a recent interview with Bob, the expert had much to say on the subject of ...


6

According to CMU, you should include the name of the original source in or next to the quote, but "On your references page, you will only list the source you actually read". The MLA, saying "The basic rule is that in both your Works Cited list and in-text citation you will still cite [the author of the direct quote]. [the author of the direct quote] will ...


6

Only cite sources you've actually seen. In this case, it sounds like you have a secondary source (your link) that quotes from and does not cite a primary source. All you can say with certainty is that this secondary source says that primary source says what it does. The way you handle this in your document is to say something like "according to (secondary ...


6

From the MLA Handbook, 8th ed., p. 55: There are circumstances in which a citation like "(Baron 194)" doesn't provide enough information to lead ambiguously to a specific entry. If you borrow from works by more than one author with the same last name (e.g., Naomi Baron and Sabrina Alcorn Baron), eliminate ambiguity in the citation by adding the authors's ...


5

Way back in 10th grade, when we were learning how to do research papers on the back of a coal shovel, our teacher had us take all our notes on 3x5 cards. We had to submit them as part of the grade — she actually went around with a bag and we had to toss in our rubber-banded stack of cards. Edit to clarify: Each card had one note or thought on it: "...


5

The guiding principle in my experience is: put the link where the reader needs the referenced information. Examples: "This interface is like Somebody Else's Thing (link, or make SET a link itself), and in addition..." -- put the link right there, because somebody unfamiliar with SET will need to at least skim the linked text to understand what you're about ...


4

Your example confuses the issue just a bit. There is a difference between print documents that are available online, and online articles. In the former case you don't need to give a link at all, and when you do, you are doing it simply to make the document more accessible. In this case you can use any link shortener that you like. The url is irrelevant to ...


4

In this case the author is not unknown. The author is the association. In this case, "American Diabetes Association". Even though there are no direct guidelines but this is the case with almost all citation styles. Also, if you export this citation, the name of the author reads as "American Diabetes Association". Zotero also reads the name as that. The same ...


4

Retype (or use OCR) if the meaning of text is the important thing. You have your formatting rules, your publication may need to be formatted, maybe made readable for mobile devices or devices for handicapped people. If the manuscript is in graphical form, e.g. illustration with descriptions of its parts or some very special formatting, e.g. alchemical ...


4

In MLA citation, the author is put before the website. Lastname, Firstname. "Title." Website Title (Italics). Publisher, Date Month Year of publication. Web. Date month year of access. If there is no author, just omit the author and begin the citation with "Title.


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