14

Except in poetry, which retains its line breaks even when put on a single line, it doesn't make sense to retain a line end hyphen elsewhere on the line. It just wouldn't make sense and it would look weird. Chicago says this specifically on their website: A hard hyphen is one that is typed deliberately and that must remain whether the phrase falls at the ...


11

According to The Chicago Manual of Style (17th ed.), 2.96: End-of-line hyphens should be marked to distinguish between soft (i.e., conditional or optional) and hard hyphens. Soft hyphens are those hyphens that are invoked only to break a word at the end of a line; hard hyphens are permanent (such as those in cul-de-sac) and must remain no matter where the ...


7

American and British English differ here. In American English, the convention is to put the punctuation inside the quotes. He proclaimed that "he sleeps with the fishes." In British English, the convention is to put the punctuation outside the quotes unless it is part of the quote. He proclaimed that "he sleeps with the fishes". Though note that in ...


6

Not overkill at all. However, the Chicago Manual of Style is not really ideal for technical writing (and is intended as a look-it-up reference, not a cover-to-cover read). It is a good guide to general, formal writing for Americans. For a more international audience, the equivalent is The Oxford Guide to Style (a.k.a. New Hart's Rules, also published as half ...


4

As a former university professor at one university, and now a full time research scientist at another, I would just add a footnote for any weeks in which the site was down. As a note, which is what they were invented for. So "Week 7: Mar 11-17[1] The following headlines were gathered: blah blah blah And in the footnote: [1]The site was inaccessible Mar ...


3

For Turabian (Probably Chicago as well, though I am particularly familiar with the Turabian guide, not Chicago directly.) When doing a long summary/paraphrase (i.e. a whole paragraph), it is best to include the name and the article/website/book title up front (this alerts the reader in general where your information is coming from). Then only put a footnote ...


3

I always saw this interpreted in graduate school as being listed as: Li, H. Short Title ABC: An introduction. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2000. Li, M. Quick Title DEC: For Experts. New York: University of New York Press, 1987. (bolding for effect) This makes it clear they're two different people. Now, as you mentioned, the last names are common, ...


3

The letter is a primary source, as you already know. This is the actual artifact, the letter the young woman received from NASA. The article about the history of these events is a secondary source; it's not a record of the events itself but a description. (It might actually be a tertiary source, but you could make the case for secondary.) This article ...


3

In CMOS 16th edition, section 9.29 (Numbered divisions in legal instruments) comes (as best I can determine) to answering my question: "Arabic or roman numerals are sometimes used to distinguish divisions within legal instruments and other documents. ... A mixture of arabic and roman numerals sometimes distinguishes small from larger divisions." The ...


3

All your examples are good, except #3. A gangster might channel The Godfather movies by proclaiming "he sleeps with the fishes." Of course we all know what this means. Periods and commas go inside the quotation mark, whether the punctuation is part of the quoted text or not. (In American English.)


3

Firstly, congratulations on landing a publisher! That's one of the hardest steps. That being said, if this is your first novel (even if not), it's probably best to go with what your publisher wants. If your novel will be published in the US, then it's general practice to have a version with the US standard of style. You can keep the UK style for the UK ...


3

The style I default to is the AP, whether it's a work of fiction or not I prefer its readability and clarity. In this case, dispense with the hyphen, if you explicity need your audience to pronounce it "right" (in their heads), spell that out on second ref--completely define the acronym on first ref. The exception being extremely well-known ac's, such as the ...


3

Consider how your reader will use the book. In an academic work (which this is not), readers: are likely to already be familiar with the cited works (they're also researchers in this field, after all) will rely on the works you cite to evaluate your work (they care about those citations) read lots of such articles and welcome a consistent style (...


3

Here's the best explanation of whether you need brackets, from the CMOS website: The brackets are obligatory only if the capitalization is part of the subject under discussion, which is rare outside of legal or textual criticism documents. (This matches up with what the book says, which is quoted here.) Also, CMOS style says to not use an ellipsis at ...


3

What about option 3? Go to "Y" read it yourself, and ensure it hasn't been taken out of context and its context is correct for what you need yourself. Having written and published several academic papers, this is exactly what I have done. This also prevents your findings from being inadvertently false based on someone-else's twisting of words or data. I ...


2

I see no reason why you'd treat the punctuation/quote convention any differently for a single letter than for a paragraph. The interaction of punctuation and quote has to do with white space and clarity of content, not the volume of what comes before those two characters.


2

This is done all the time. You just write your paragraph, put a superscripted number or whatever reference method you're using at the end, and give the usual information about the source you drew this information from in a footnote or endnote. A citation does not have to be, and very often is not, an exact quote. If you give an exact quote, put it in ...


2

Most Modern Christian works use footnotes except for scripture which is always cited inline. Early works which predate modern citation styles use the author's name or the common identifier for a work when an author was known for more than one work, as many works had no titles, page numbers or publishers in a narrative citation style (the citation, what there ...


2

By "prose" I take it you mean "narrative". But whatever. RE writing single letters in italics: I agree, that just doesn't apply here. I presume you're referring to their discussion about referring to letters as letters, like a teacher saying, "Now, Billy, write the letter 'M' on the blackboard." This doesn't apply to acronyms. In general, I'd write a word ...


2

This is generally known as a "secondary source" citation and while not favored or viewed as highly as a primary source citation, provided it is accurately referenced from the secondary source it is generally considered acceptable.


2

I'm going to give up and assemble what little I've found into an answer, because nobody else has done so. The section numbers below refer to CMoS16 as found on the Chicago Manual's website (after signing up for the 30-day trial). How much of the source details should I translate, and where? "How much": 14.71: You may translate things like "volume" and "...


2

Author of Paper, A., and B. Author of Paper. Year. "Title of Paper." Paper presented at Title of Conference: Subtitle of Conference, Location, Date. https://doi.org/10.XXX/XXXXX.XX So in your case: Matt Baughman, Christian Haas, Rich Wolski, Ian Foster, and Kyle Chard. 2018, "Predicting Amazon Spot Prices with LSTM Networks." Paper presented at 9th ...


2

Did you take screenshots of it being down? Does the site have an errors log? Is there a site you checked those days to make sure it wasn't just you? (https://www.isitdownrightnow.com/ and https://downforeveryoneorjustme.com/ are a few). If the site is consistently archived on Archive.org's Wayback Machine, if you can show that on days surrounding it, there ...


1

Is there a source for determining the convention? Yes. It is the editor of the book you are trying to publish. Following TCMOS is in itself a convention. Several items change from edition to edition. And some authors are just stubborn.


1

A practical way of looking at this is realizing that PDF (Portable Document Format) was intentionally created to be the electronic representation of a physically printed (printable) document. While it has developed over the years to have extensions (e.g., forms), it is very much still that way today. Unlike websites, PDF files don't change dynamically. ...


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