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1

This is part of the plot of The Three Musketeers. In Alexandre Dumas' famous novel, the main character d'Artagnan belongs to a different military branch than his three friends (Athos, Portos, and Aramis) who belong the The Musketeers military group. The main character, through happenstance, accidentally annoys those three the first time he meets them, and ...


1

You certainly can do this. A better question is whether or not you should. Does your story actually need multiple POVs? Especially if the characters are all together, I question whether it is worth the cost in decreasing your attachment to any one character. There are cases like a romance or morally grey conflict in which the second perspectives add ...


1

Comm systems. If they've got any human traits (assuming they're of the human race), the need for company would probably be one of them. At least occasionally. You've got two people on "a deserted island". They need to communicate to stay alive, so to speak. Who's fishing today? Who's watching the fire? "Did you hear the ruffling in the bushes last night? We ...


6

Your schedule doesn't make sense IRL. People WILL find ways to interact and keep each other company; we are social animals. They will talk, even if their conversations are by radio. They will share entertainment. They will do their work in each other's presence, on the bridge. People like company; even if one doesn't, the other one does. IRL, people often ...


10

I think the key here is in the method of communication. Whilst face-to-face, using the verbal communication, the male character appears curt and uncommunicative but. But on reading his logs she finds pure poetry from a man who is only able to fully express himself through the written word. The reading of the previous shift's logs becomes a back-and-forth ...


0

The fact that you're writing a short story gives you more leniency with this than a novel or a novella. If you're writing in second person, DO NOT give your protagonist a name! It will be very immersion breaking if you're addressing the reader as the protagonist and then give the protagonist a name that isn't the reader's name. However, if you're writing ...


3

Create a minor emergency that can be resolved only by two people working together. Perhaps the fix calls for repeated overlap every four hours between watches. Maybe each cooks for the other for those times.


0

You can switch POV as often as you wish. Talented writers can pull off virtually anything. However, without knowing your skill or experience, I'd probably advise against it. And, if it were me, I certainly wouldn't attempt to write the piece the way you propose. Reader can follow and adapt to logical patterns. Consider the action tag, the association ...


0

One variant of this is for the protagonist to be useless by the criteria their society uses. But no-one is useless entirely; it's about finding your niche, whoever that may put you amongst. Every example looks different, so I'll flesh out three. Consider Touma in A Certain Magical Index. In a city that values measurable "esper" abilities, he's the only ...


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You could check KonoSuba light novel, it's about a neet whose get involved into a magic world but has no special habilities and only success with his lucky and funny dirty tricks


5

Look at Indiana Jones. In Raiders of the Lost Ark, Jones doesn't really DO anything important to the plot, he is just chasing Nazis, getting himself into trouble, or trapped, or in a chase scene, but he doesn't actually DO anything to bring about the ending. In other words, he is a dispensable character, but as the MC we see the adventure through his ...


0

There are situations in which having a nameless character works, but it takes a lot of skill to bring off. The best example I can think of is the nameless hero of the Clint Eastwood spaghetti Westerns. The lack of a name made him, IMHO, both more and less than a man. Another example I remember is a story printed in Analog during the 70s or early 80s. The ...


0

I would consider them somewhat of a contagonist as described in Dramatica. The contagonist doesn't necessarily help the contagonist but they do hinder and interact with protagonist.


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I think this would count as Deuteragonist. Not the main character, but not a complete antagonist. The biggest example for these are sidekicks and allies, but they don’t have to be helping the protagonist always.


1

Presently, the most talked about television show is the Star Wars series "The Mandolorian" which is about a member of the Mandolorian Culture and his adventures with a young member of the species to which Jedi Master Yoda belongs to. At time of writing, four episodes have been released and neither character has been named on screen and no allusion to a ...


4

Is it "permissable", for purposes of my novel, to create a second daughter? Yes, that is called historical fiction. Given the time, the daughter could be an illegitimate child of Grand Duke Vladimir; it was not unusual in the 1870-ish time frame for royalty to have affairs with multiple women, including servants of their own house or in the houses they ...


0

You could attempt a Fight Club esc. spin on it, by adding certain aspects/reactions/objects and actions throughout the story that can only then be understood omnisciently.


1

You should refer to the character based on your POV character, who would be the eyes and ears of the audience. If this is third person, John and Mike would be known through their relationship with a POV character (David). If your narrator is first person either as a character in a scene or reporting the details, this will follow the character's natural ...


3

Interesting intrigue. When YOU write about the 2 characters, you should willingly mislead the reader by calling them John and Mike But be careful when the story characters talk to them, avoid to call them directly by their name, if both of them keep the secret. I presume that both of them will "play the game", in order not to have problems in their new ...


0

The best answer I could think of is "Wild Card".


2

So generally there is a tier of characters and how many you should have. Hero/Perspective Character- There should be only one of these, though it's not a hard rule and not necessarily required either. This should be the character through who's "eyes" the audience witnesses the story. If the story is first person, it's the narrator's character, if the ...


2

No one says you have to classify your characters, your characters are there to support the plot and overall story, how they do so is pedantic. Let's take Game of Thrones as an example, here we have a very large cast of characters. We couldn't possibly have the same show without Daenyris, so she's absolutely a main character. At the same time, we couldn't ...


2

Yes if you watch stories like Star Wars of Game of Thrones, there is multiple main characters. Maybe most of the characters are important to the overall intrigue. In a more classic way you could use a list of kind of people to structure your story : protagonist aka main(s) character. Can be a hero or an anti-hero deuteragonist (can be a sidekick or a main ...


1

Can there be more than one main character? Absolutely! can their be a protagonist and other main characters that the story focuses on? Yep, and that sounds like what you are describing in your "Lisa" example - there's one key protagonist (Lisa) but the other main characters are also significant in the story, primarily because of how they exist in order ...


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