New answers tagged

0

If the loss of that character proves to be very tragic for the rest, you might consider having him or her die before page one of book one. Then, the rest of the characters start off devastated and have to work through their grief before admitting another into their ranks. The story of the deceased character could be told via flashbacks, fond memories, ...


0

In order to show that your "Lightning Bruiser character" is a legitimate threat, you might have it launch a surprise attack that does considerable damage to the larger armored character. That would show that character not only as a threat but also as a treacherous, sneaky villain who will stop at nothing to win.


0

Here is the worst example I could think of where a writer omitted mentioning a detail of their protagonist's appearance until that detail became important to the story, thus making that detail seem like a deus ex machina. There is a famous science fiction story "Deadline", by Cleve Cartmill, Astounding Science Fiction, March 1944, about wartime ...


0

I always suggest that to write a fight or major action scene, you need to use brief sentences. Try to keep each sentence limited to describing one action of the speedier character's movement. Don't complicate it. This creates a sense of urgency and swiftness. As you said you wanted a hit and run tactics or at least that the speedier character can't stop ...


1

As well as describing the red hair early as the other answers suggest I'd also advise describing it explicitly. Don't feel obligated to add in all your character's other physical traits as well, if the red hair is the only trait that is relevant make it the only one you describe. Otherwise the reader may not pick up on it. For example I was reading a story ...


3

For many people, the story plays out like a movie in their head as they read. If you don't "cast" a face into the role quickly, they'll have already filled it with their own imagination. Within a few sentences of introducing a new character, stories tend to describe the important characteristics you'd notice if you saw them on screen to avoid ...


3

Do it early, if at all. People usually form their impressions of a character based on the first time they see them enter the story, and if you don't describe them there the image won't stick in their mind. But later, about six chapters in, another character mentions that she has red hair. Will this disrupt the mental image that readers have already formed ...


-1

Actually, a character usually gets by with very little physical description. If it's not necessary for the plot, I wouldn't mention the red hair at all, so that you don't confuse the reader unnecessarily and ruin his own imagination.


-3

Write a short disclaimer on the back of the book, simply stating that the story includes the topic of suicide. Then write whatever you want inside the book: physical/ details, what method is used, how much blood there was etc. Write whatever you want. Nobody should blame the author for a random reader committing suicide, that's ridiculus.


2

Interesting question. In a text, it is difficult to mention things subtly, whereas in a movie, you can show things without giving away their meaning. For example, if there is an axe hanging on the wall in the movie, someone may or may not be beaten to death with it later. In the book, on the other hand, the reader would expect something to happen to it if it ...


0

Going to add a simple answer into the mix as I completely agree with the OP. Detailed character breakdowns are definitely important, but sometimes much simpler first steps can help. Personally for me, whenever I am consuming something fictional (book, film, game etc) and a character is introduced I always ask myself these two questions: What is awesome ...


2

The points you have mentioned in your question are things that the author should know about the characters. Those bits of information and ideas are to help the author make the characters's actions consistent and coherent. They are not things that the author must explicitly tell or show to the reader. As a reader, I would be fairly disappointed if the author ...


3

You're having trouble looking at it from a perspective that is not that of the humans in the story. You're innately considering anything that eats humans as "evil". But if your protagonists are monsters, then human morality doesn't factor into the narrative evil. To put it differently, just because Superman eats a steak doesn't mean he's the ...


0

Consider the environments they evolved in, even if it's a supernatural environment. Different environments, different traits, including psychological. Like the diff between khajiit and argonians.


1

Different Attitudes to killing You already have two versions of motivation for your creatures, non-sentient hunger and intelligent, sophisticated serial killer. Since you refer to them as having a society, I take it you want human-like motivations for things. So, look into why people do anything in real life. Maybe one of them just lives their life and kills ...


1

I heard Frank Cotterell Boyce speak about writing 'Millions'. He wrote a script. The producer asked him to write a novel to help sell the film. He did so but discovered that what worked on film didn't work in a novel. I would strongly recommend you read the book and compare it to the film. Other authors are not so simple. For example, if you read 'For Whom ...


0

Give the monsters quirks and hobbies. There are lot of calories in a human adult, especially in developed countries. They don't have to be hunting and killing all the time. Maybe they like bonsai, gaming, turtles, antique china, obsessing over Judge Judy (Juror Judith?) reruns, memes, or semi-pro pogo sticking. These can be traits they've carried over from ...


4

Music doesn't work too well. Try writing a scene to a song. It doesn't work that well. I've tried a few, but without both sound and sight set, it's kinda hard to do. Movies can set both images and the music, and get everything just perfectly timed for amazing scenes. Text, however, can't set the images, and since everyone has a different reading speed, it's ...


7

Your antagonists need motivations, and these will become themes You've said that some of each type of monster decide not to eat humans. Okay, so why do the ones which do eat humans, decide to eat humans? Having a good answer to that will give your monsters enough personality to be antagonists for a few chapters. This should also tie into the themes ...


9

Humans, Only Not as Much Anymore: You gave the answer, and it's a broad one. You need to interact with the monsters for them to have character - otherwise they're vague threats. All of them are former people. So what motivates people? These aren't zombies, they're thinking beings. Only a small percentage of them are going to be psychopaths, killing people ...


22

Don't ascribe human motivations to non-human creatures I think the core of the problem you are encountering is your decision to ascribe a pathological motivation to your protagonists. If you start with a set of rational needs for your sapient monsters, then I think you'll end up with better characterizations, especially if those needs operate on multiple ...


3

Authors use characters' wants and fears when crafting the narrative because authors want readers' engagement with their stories. It is not a question of what readers' really want, but how an author decides to establish the motivations that drive plots forward. One method of achieving that is for the plot to be the fallout of the characters' decisions. Using ...


Top 50 recent answers are included