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Watch movies and read books that have positive family interactions. Hang out with friends who have have positive relationships with their family. Also note that family relationships don't have to be viewed as simply "good" or "bad." Flanner O Connor's complete short stories is a great resource for complicated family relationships. Her stories are in ...


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If you want to do a bad relationship with your character's family, think of meeting a stranger, uncomfortable with awkward silent moments. If you want an "I hate you" relationship then try to express your character's angry like "grits teeth" or "clenches fists together" If you want them to be polity then you should make your character stuttery and shy ...


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Typically, scripts will, on first appearence of the character, introduce them by their full name, and from then on, they will use a shortened form of the name. If the character is "John Smith" he will be given his first line of dialog as "JOHN SMITH" and from then on be "JOHN". If two characters have a similar name (John Smith and John Doe) it may be ...


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Possible solutions: Honesty/transparency is her top core value Something makes him suspicious, so he asks her a pointed question. Her only other option would be to blatantly lie, so she tells him then. She doesn't tell him, but some circumstance gives it away.


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It seems like you have more control on the guy then the girl. Therefore, I would suggest that the girl might face something that makes her life turns 180 degrees to a different person - like a loss from someone she cares, or perhaps losing her memories. She then starts to slow down on her lifestyle and began to realize that she needs to stop and see the ...


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Something no one has brought up yet is that many character "flaws" are in some contexts adaptive and useful. Someone who is brash but improved may still be more likely to take action when others are hesitating at a time when quick action is optimal. A recovered jerk may be more likely to speak up at someone else being abusive than would someone more used to ...


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Look at "The Yellow Wallpaper" by Charlotte Perkins Gilman. It is the classic short story of a narrator's descent into madness, caused by post-partum depression and male oppression at a time when women were considered inferior. Read Mark Vonnegut's “The Eden Express,” about "his descent into schizophrenic madness in a counter‐culture wilderness commune." ...


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I can't tell you how to write but I can condense this entire question: Why was Tasslehoff Burrfoot the (second) most enjoyable character to read about in the entire Dragonlance series? Tas, like all kender of the Dragonlance series, could be compared to a 5-year-old child; he is utterly irresponsible in any task that is not of the utmost importance, and ...


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No matter how much real or fictional people grow, they never become perfect. That's one of those observations that simultaneously seems impossible and obvious: obvious because no-one is ever perfect, and impossible because how do they keep finding new imperfections that need work? My own experience - in myself, in people I've known, in people I've known of, ...


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The most natural story about a broken man is story of how he becomes less broken Normally, someone has a (relatively) unified sense of self, and a hierarchy of priorities. A "broken man" has lost whatever central motivation he possessed. The man who wanted raise good children, and see them live better lives than he did? His children are dead. The man ...


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I don't know if this will help you or not, but here are some insights I've picked up from reading material that has tried to do (and in some cases done it by accident) what you are trying to do. Let's start with real life insanity that led to incredible literary work; Phillip K Dick. This is a man who struggled his entire life to get out of what he thought ...


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I think you're on the right track with the "compensating" for their flaws, in combination with actual growth. As for compensation, this can be external factors. Look at the character of Alexander Hamilton from the musical Hamilton. This is a character that "leaps before he looks" and needs to learn to wait for the right moment like the antagonist of the ...


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Honestly, most of the previous answers are going to be better than what I am going to give. It's the whole dichotomy between getting what you want versus getting what you need. You asked how to avoid basing the character on yourself, but (to echo the room here) is that it's okay to have a character or plot that is to some degree based on yourself, your life, ...


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This is a big, important question. After all characters must be distinct and unique or else they are no longer characters, but rather bland, amorphous machines whose actions can only be explained by a need to advance the plot. On the other hand, characters changing and growing is vital to plot; otherwise why do we the reader care about them? Sidenote here, ...


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DISCLAIMER: I won't say tl;dr, but I will say Too long; I skimmed. Love your thoroughness though. A few ideas of mine (take or leave): You could spread out when each character has their "AHA" moment. Maybe one guy has improved himself fundamentally, but this only deepens the core flaw of his girlfriend because of their dynamic. She'll have to wait longer ...


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You could think "How would I respond in this scenario?" and then do the exact opposite. You could give your mean character a behavioral pattern that is simple to you but deeply engrained and maybe complex to them. All their knee-jerk reactions follow this track (maybe they always defend themselves, or always roll their eyes, as a result of their pattern of ...


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For me the primary way to write any character (or to write parts of a character) that are different than myself is to study that archetype in films and in person and in books, sometimes letters even. I also give my characters personality types according to multiple personality type tests (I find Enneagram the most useful but also use Myers Briggs and Life ...


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The question boils down to the following: "How do I learn to use language efficiently, be imaginative, and become a successful writer?". Forgive me for saying this, but this is way too vague. There is a reason why writers need real life experience before they proceed to write. I find it hard to write mean characters for the same reason: I am a good person. ...


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Here are a few things I would say : adjectives : - stubby (implying he is fat, don't know if you want that) - low (old english) imagery : - "he had trouble measuring me, and had to stand on a stool" - " he look up to me to meet my eyeline as I shook his hand" - "he stood up straight to gain a few centimetres i'll edit this answer if other forms come to ...


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You might look into a distinction sometimes made between meltdowns, which may be thought of as external (and often may be described as 'tantrums' by teachers, colleagues, parents etc.), and shutdowns, which are internal. Here I would suggest (as somebody with asperger's who is typically very good at masking his symptoms) that your character might have a ...


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Some say the best way to write about characters is to study their faces when situations are presented to them. A good example of this is Dubliners by James Joyce, for he makes excellent observations on faces. Basic facial responses to situations may disclose much about a person. In short, the way those that draw make studies of portraits with sketches may ...


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Also, when writing superheroes, some of my favorite support characters are the ones who are the non-powered spouse who are in on the hero's secrets. You don't have to have powers to be awesome in a superhero story. You don't even have to physically fight. I would suggest that you make this person a INTJ type on the Meyers-Brigg test (AKA The Masterminds) ...


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Whenever I have this kind of problem, I always sit down and try to tell myself this character's story. Pretend like you are now going to write a book, but it's going to be about them and not your MC, and not even about what is going on in your book. I start at an earlier time, was their childhood interesting? How did they get to meeting the rest of the ...


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Close your eyes, leave the keyboard alone for a bit, and imagine yourself as the character—but not at the point you're having trouble writing. If this is the first time you've immersed yourself in their head, start from the beginning. It sounds like you've got a good idea of the events that made them the way they are, so work your way through those events, ...


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Well, one answer that instantly came out was give him a talent. This man had to have learned to survive powerless in a world of gods and monsters (Metaphorically). He must have some way of dealing with these types of people. Maybe he's trained himself in a martial art that can at least stall the villains. Or maybe he's a crack shot, and can take out the ...


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Let me give a slightly different way to think about it than numbers or division. Imagine being whipped for a crime. You may not have this experience exactly, but you must have some experience as a child being inflicted pain. If this does not work for you imagine talking to someone as you are having a fight, or a breakup. Something where you struggle to hold ...


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