New answers tagged

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Don't worry bout labels. Write the character as she is. From the pen of the immortal Mark Twain: There are nineteen rules governing literary art in domain of romantic fiction... Cooper violated eighteen of them. These eighteen require: ... 6. They require that when the author describes the character of a personage in the tale, the conduct and conversation ...


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I think the best approach is not for her to push away the ones that she loves, but to push them away before they can get that close to her to begin with. I'm writing a character like this. She's been bullied for all of the time she's been in school (the narrative starts when she's 17), and so every attempt to get close to her is taken as a scheme to glean ...


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One thing you could to is to jump to the ending of your story, write the ending, and then work backwards from that. (I am told that this is how Margaret Mitchell wrote Gone with the Wind.) (Also, this can help with plotting; instead of figuring out what will happen next, you instead figure out what had to happen in order for what follows to occur.) When you ...


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For any scene change, start a new chapter, especially if the change is the POV person. But it would be far better to use one POV instead of jumping around, especially if you are relatively new and unknown as an author. The bigger problem I see in recent readings of novels during the Covid shutdowns is unclear pronouns. "We were verbing..." Who are '...


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This is a common technique, but one that I --speaking as a reader --personally hate. Multiple first person is very tricky to pull off well, because you need to maintain two distinct voices, and because switching viewpoints tends to endanger the reader's immersion and suspension of disbelief. As @The-Huntress mentioned in the comments, switching to 3rd person ...


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Magic/Psychological There is a scene from Eragon(book not movie) where the elf princess person(forget the name right now) is being tortured by the evil shade man(also forget name). The torture methods themselves were magical and physical, but you can torture with magic or just poking them a bunch with sharp objects. Once the MC is on the brink of death, or ...


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Just make sure that the reader knows who 'I' is. The Kane Chronicles does this well, but they use chapters which you say you don't want to use, but that's fine. I think the best way would be to do a break of some sort, probably with the characters name in the middle. This way the character doesn't say 'I'm (insert name here)' every time you switch and the ...


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I personally don't see it much as an LGBT story. The girl and the male spirit are two independent beings, in flesh and in spirit. The only quirk here is that they (at least the girl) are a first-person observers of other's actions. Of course it can be made tasteless, for example by male spirit's lewd comments or girl's own desire to make sexual conquests in ...


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My thought is to examine and write down your feelings and transfer them to the character. If you feel jittery before the battle, then she feels jittery before the battle, etc. You are in a perfect place to imagine her feelings. Also you can have the same attitude as your MC, "“Enough of this crap. I’m gonna write this thing anyway, might as well just ...


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Oh it's normal alright. A lot of writers have the same issue. This battle is going to be a turning point for the entire rest of the series. If you mess it up, or it doesn't live up to everything you wanted it to be, it'll be disappointing. Right now I'm in the middle of a chapter that will change the course of my entire story, in fact, it's vital that this ...


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Yep, I'd say that's very normal. I even find myself sweating or getting jittery if I'm working on a nervewracking part. Recently I got anxious to write a scene that wasn't even a huge battle, it was just an argument - but it had a lot riding on it, as it fleshed out an important character's family history and give insight into why she views herself the way ...


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I have read french letters to their family from the trenches of the first world war. I have read accounts of the sailors that were part of the sailor uprising in Kiel in 1918. I have read the accounts of german soldiers of both Wehrmacht and Volkssturm from the second World War, the former from early in the war as well as from Stalingrad, the latter from the ...


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Yes this is completely normal. You're making a pretty big decision for the rest of your story, and you're probably just second guessing yourself, trying to figure out how to spin it after the big fight scene. Most of the time, the fight scene itself isn't actually all that important, but after all the I-shoot-you-and-you-shoot-me-and-I-shoot-you-back-etc-etc-...


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The fact of offense is nothing ; the reason for offense is everything. There are people who are offended when homosexuals are oppressed. They believe that every human being has an essential dignity that cannot be denied simply because their life choices displease us. There are people who are offended when homosexuals are not oppressed. They believe that a ...


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looks down on herself because she thinks she is ugly That's the difference. You as the author aren't saying that from the outside, the character thinks of herself as that from the inside. Many readers have issues today with HP Lovecraft, who (in common with many people of his class and era) was profoundly racist. Various stories describe how ugly someone ...


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There is no perfect amount, it all depends on what you need. The Michael Vey series started with 1 MC, then went up to 3, hired 2 more, rescued a couple more, ending up with about a dozen I think(and that's just the good guy side). The story was good, and not a whole lot got in the way of each other. On the other hand, the book Rash only really had one MC ...


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People with differing eyes can be extremely attractive (just like people with similar eyes). Some are employed as models for this very reason. Try searching for different coloured eyes If this is a modern series then the person's friend could point this out. If it is a medieval scenario, the friend could remind her of a renowned queen of legendary beauty ...


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Some people are insecure about their freckles. Some people say "I don't like my nose, it's too big!" This doesn't automatically offend everybody with freckles or large noses. If someone says they hate being short, that wouldn't offend me, a fellow shorty. We all have hang ups about different physical traits. Your MC can be insecure about her ...


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We sadly live in the age of snowflakes, where no matter what you write and how, someone somewhere will feel offended by it. That doesn't mean you should stop caring. But you should realize that a lot of good literature is offensive, sometimes intentionally. The questions to ask, IMHO, are: Are you trying to be offensive or not? If yes, is it for a good ...


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These days there is someone who is offended by everything so anything you do will offend somebody. Do not worry about your example. The eyes should not bother anyone especially if you use the correct medical term for that condition. The reference to race will lake offend half the people no matter how you do it.


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You are righting a story here, not a paper, yes? So I would argue the question might not be, "what pronoun should I always use for this AI?" but rather, I would say that much depends on the characters in your story, their personalities, backgrounds, beliefs, and inclinations. THEY are the ones who are going to be interacting with, and referring to, ...


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How to not be offensive in a nutshell: Make the characters complex. For a lot of people who care about making the right characters, they feel like they have to rely on tons of research. While research is a good thing to use, my best advice is really just to make humans and not to worry about being offensive. While yes, you may need research if their ...


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As long as you play it right, it should be fine. Most people will be rather forgiving with this stuff, unless they had a bad day and just want someone to yell at. Definitely don't write with the purpose of being mean, else that will get people annoyed at you. I bet that just you writing without really paying attention to this kind of stuff will be fine, and ...


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DWKraus touched on this with their comment: if the AI is truly sentient and self-aware, it's probably capable of choosing a set of pronouns for itself. I see two ways you could then work that into the story: either the characters explicitly ask the AI for its pronouns, much as you might when talking to a non-binary human, or the characters unknowingly use ...


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In Dickens' David Copperfield, the protagonist, David, is given many nicknames by the other characters. These nicknames do not reflect aspects of young David's personality or actions, but they do tell the reader something about the characters who bestow those nicknames. I think you might approach this question in a similar fashion. To those who do not ...


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When writing a romance novel, A way you might think of a character who is developing feelings for another, one might think of it in a way that it is your first crush, This may sound odd, but it is a way of thinking in denial. Also one might think this is just a phase, if you need more help let me know!


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I think 'it' or 'AI's name' is probably the best bet. If you reference AI's name once in a conversation, you can then switch to calling it 'it' as long as it is clear that 'it' refers to the AI. If this gets in the way of your dialogue, maybe just go by the name. in Person of Interest, they called their AI 'The Machine' or 'Samaritan'(there were two) and ...


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Flip a coin. Heads he lives, Tails he dies. That way neither you nor your reader can predict if he lives or not.


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Just like Playing D&D I've run into this problem a few times, although the characters were across different stories and then everything started to sound the same in different settings. My solution? I role-played my characters, even in one case made a dnd character sheet. Writing down your characters personality/traits/pet peeves and constantly checking ...


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Try reading Brandon Sanderson's Mistborn Trilogy. Spoiler Alert One of the main characters gets killed in an epic battle at the climax of the first book. However, he then becomes a martyr and god to the people so his influence lives on, while other more subordinate characters rise to become main characters in their own right in later books. Really ...


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Sure. They can die. But make sure you do it right. Websites to show: https://writersrelief.com/2013/11/17/main-characters-how-to-kill-your-protagonist-without-killing-your-fanbase/


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And they never recovered the body... I'm a big fan of the 'mysterious death' scenario. I've even seen games that integrate this into the rules. In this case, as the MC defeats the hero, he/they go plummeting downward into the clouds over the sea. The body(ies) is/are never recovered. This way, readers who also love the MC can hope he's really NOT dead, and ...


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Yes, it is okay to kill a main character. But be careful, readers experience the story you've written through your characters. Killing a character could effectively shut one the windows your reader views the world though. However, there's nothing about death which forces a character's presence to vanish from your story and your reader to lose that vehicle of ...


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Simply put, it's okay to kill the main character. There's just one thing to worry about, make sure that you don't make it to where the character dies because they die. The reader shouldn't walk out thinking "What was the point of reading the story if he was going to die?". If this is what you get out of readers, then your character, no matter how ...


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You need to ask yourself what kind of story are you trying to tell, what are the themes and the core messages. Then ask yourself whether the ending including Dylan's survival contributes or detracts from those things compared to an ending including his death. How do your characters grow, learn, and change over the course of the story? What is Dylan's role in ...


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Heck yeah, you can kill a main character. If you've read the Harry Potter series, Spoiler alert if you haven't The Goblet of Fire opens up with a character who quickly becomes central to that books story line. Cedric Diggory was created as a mostly perfect character, (very likable, handsome, nice) specifically so that when he was killed at the end of the ...


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What if getting her soul back is actually the way to SAVE her life? So the elf leader said she would be killed by a warrior with a bone sword. So what? How many times was that guy right about anything since she's met him? 0? Still... the thought that maybe this once what he said might not have been completely random garbage wouldn't leave her alone. So while ...


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Everyone is always in conflict, and everyone stands at the precipice of fulfilled wishes and realizable dreams, only to step away from the edge. She wants to never die. She already has this with her soul being protected in the necklace. There must be some benefit, some pleasure, some power that comes from living united with one's soul. This benefit can ...


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When GOALS are at odds with one another, it can lead to conflict. One of the most classic ways of creating tension or arguments between characters is to give them motivations/goals that on the face of things seem to conflict with one another (even if they really don't, either because some plot twist that resolves the conflict hasn't occurred yet, or because ...


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Everyone has arguments. They are just of a different kind. Your characters are selfless, kindhearted and don't have quick tempers? That reminds me, in fact, of my mother. Was she the type of a person inclined to have arguments? Not at all. Did she have arguments with other people (and me in particular)? Absolutely! Kind and selfless people wouldn't start ...


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Everybody is flawed Characters who are similar in worldview/behavior can still come in to conflict due to their own flaws. For example confronting a person who hurt them (or a loved one) in a way that was traumatizing, this could be a triggering moment for one of the characters. In the movie Big Hero 6 for example there is a group of teens who work together ...


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I can only say for myself, but I think that a character is only overloaded with problems of the new problem doesn’t significantly add to the issue. If you can cut a problem and not much changes - cut it. However, there are ways to add weight to problems in order to keep them: such as keeping an emotional toll. If your character starts as a "normal" ...


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This one's pretty simple, I think. Hello fellow new contributor! Let's see if I can help you out here! I'm a 13 year old writer and I almost had this same problem. But, luckily, I fixed it. And it wasn't nearly as hard as I had thought it would be. All it takes is a little bit of experience with your characters. You have to get to know your character before ...


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I say let em' die. My reasoning? Simple. Protagonists are human too. You can't expect them to be perfect and neither will the reader. I don't know about the rest of you. But I read books for two reasons. The first reason is obvious: because they're entertaining. But the second reason is different: To show that 1. Even heroes make mistakes. And 2. To remind ...


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My answer is yes and no. Ok, so here's what I think: There can definitely be too many obstacles in a character's path... however. The amount of obstacles that can be in said character's path is all based on your own skill as a writer. If you can somehow implement all of these obstacles into your novel without making it seem too unrealistic then I say go for ...


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Turn it on It's head: Villains SHOULD be conflicted creatures. No soul = no mercy. The prophecy is ambiguous enough that it may not mean she dies - only that her reign ends (and a new one begins). A human may be the only one who can handle the necklace in a critical way, so only a human can give it back to her without the soul going back into her. Or perhaps ...


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When a character is a tad insane and want it all they can only do one thing, find a loophole. A story I heard before was about a vampire who wanted to become mortal again but was afraid to die. So she eventually found a loophole by tethering her life to another immortal creature and sealing it away, making her an immortal human. Seeing you work in a realm of ...


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Yes. It’s fine to have someone die. Just make sure that you don’t only kill side Characters, because then it makes the main characters seem immortal, and the reader expects them to turn out okay. The way I avoided this in my book is creating a main character who’s sole purpose is to get really important, draw a lot of empathy from the reader, and then be ...


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Never ever tell unless it is absolutely necessary. Nobody wants to read a chapter that's talking about history or backstory. Instead, try to show your reader. For example: If for a thousand years there has been a war going on between dragons and humans, then let the reader know this information by having people talk about a battle plan, how one has failed a ...


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Yes. There are two main problems. The first is that if you throw in too much, the reader will be unable to see the story as a complete thing and a work of art. How many is too many partly depends on the skill of the author in delineating the complications and how they relate to it, so beta readers may be necessary. The second is that if you throw too many, ...


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