6

You can carry the same subject through multiple actions in the same sentence without repeating "she" (or her name) over and over again; the subject in each additional clause should be clear to the reader. Something like: Jane opened her eyes and reached out toward her screeching alarm, fumbling as always to silence it before it woke the neighbor's ...


5

Be very careful and sensitive when writing a character with a real-world major personality disorder. Especially a villain. If you're going to portray an explicitly and medically diagnosed schizophrenic or Dissociative Identity Disorder (DID) character, and you make that diagnosis clear in your story, I would strongly advise you to consult a sensitivity ...


4

Love can't be forced. It happens naturally. You've probably heard "no means no" in the real world as applied to relationships, dating and consent. Unsurprisingly, the same principle applies in your own writing. If a character is deeply in love with another character, pursues them endlessly, and generally does all the right things to try and win ...


2

Write the first draft. Then go back and revise according to whether it sounds right, and all the pronouns have a clear referent. After you revise to make sure you have a coherent plot and clear characterization and a distinctive setting. This is because you could revise this passage twenty times to get the pronouns right, and then realize the whole thing has ...


2

Make them proactive and enthusiastic I think there are two reasons such characters can come across as annoying. Firstly, they seem passive, waiting for someone else to sort their problems out and tell them what to do. Secondly, they’re wet blankets. I wrote a character like that and one beta reader told me that they wanted to get all excited about this new ...


2

Make the Scene Work Harder, or Cut it You can absolutely introduce a character for one scene. The real question is whether the scene is worthwhile as it is. You describe the scene as if all it does is world-building. I would either expand it or cut it. Scenes need to do multiple things at once. The most important thing I scene needs to do is provide a source ...


2

Just try to be logically consistent Consider the following premises: there is almost no social mobility; protagonist, who is a member of a lower-ranking caste and hates the aristocracy, ends up leading a band of quirky misfits to save the supernatural aristocrats from an assassination plot And two proposed conclusions: protagonist's "reward" for ...


1

The best example of an extroverted character who goes through an I credible and compelling character arc is Aang from Avatar:The last airbender. He's also the main character. I think something you should look at OS your character's flaws. For Aang, he wasn't ready to face his destiny, and therefore failed his entire people, and the consequences were severe. ...


1

I have a coming-of-age story where the protagonist has an extroverted, sociable personality. However, when plotting the story I have found that the introverted deuteragonist, which has that stereotypical shy, uncertain personality, comes off as more interesting because they go through a greater amount of change as part of their personal arc. The protagonist ...


1

I'm assuming you're talking about someone other than the viewpoint character (where you would be able to show the internal reaction). How much other people would notice of someone hurting from a rejection depends both on the rejected person's personality and how close they are. If the rejected person reacts by becoming unusually quiet, withdrawn, sullen, ...


1

I largely depends in what type of personality they have. If they're the go-getter person who's optimistic, try to have them act normal in front of everyone, but there's an internal sob-fest going on. Or make them act all sullen and dull in front of people, but nobody can seem to cheer them up. Make them grump and agitated all the time. Or dramatic. Or just ...


1

If you want to write a worldview, it helps to encounter it first-hand If you've only heard about a historical period, or read second- and third-hand accounts of the attitudes in a period and place, you're unlikely to be able "get into the heads" of people with the attitudes of those times. You may not even, really, understand the attitudes and ...


1

Because, dear author, the leader is a politician and must play politics. While he may realize society is erroneously backwards, he cannot right the ship of state on his own and he realizes his sudden understanding is very much in the minority opinion among those who can make change. If he were to be more vocal about his stance, than the politicos would end ...


1

As far as I've been able to determine most romance starts with a spark (or a moment) between the two people. It doesn't have to be special or anything, it just happens (something says click, two emotional/spiritual/romantic puzzle pieces fit together, and so on)... However, that "interest" does not have to be love at first sight. Sometimes it's ...


1

As they say in show biz: There are no small parts, only small actors. Take this person and make their one line memorable. Think of it as a cameo by a famous actor past his or her prime.


1

This exact kind of questioning, to the point that it helped make the main character unlikable, was a significant feature of Lord Foul's Bane The first volume of "The Chronicles of Thomas Covenant". Of course the fact that the MC celebrated the renewed vigor that the fantasy world had brought him by raping the young girl who had first befriended him ...


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