6

Disclaimer: I'm autistic, but have never had a full-blown meltdown. This answer is based on past experiences with overload which I felt were veering in that direction but may be off-base. A good metaphor for autistic overload, as I experience it, is this: imagine your brain is a computer. Suddenly, one process begins taking up all the memory available and ...


3

Whenever I have this kind of problem, I always sit down and try to tell myself this character's story. Pretend like you are now going to write a book, but it's going to be about them and not your MC, and not even about what is going on in your book. I start at an earlier time, was their childhood interesting? How did they get to meeting the rest of the ...


3

I am a pretty straight-laced person and have only been drunk a few times in my life in the safety of my own home, so I don't speak from extensive personal experience. But if you want a description of what it's like, especially for somebody who doesn't drink a lot, it feels a lot like you are being put under for dental surgery, or you are super super tired ...


2

I must preface this by pointing out that the two autistic people in my life are both non-verbal and so they can't explain in their own words. As was best described to me, when they have outbursts, it's not because something has upset them per se, but that they can't really compute how to handle the situation and are frustrated by the inability to figure out ...


2

I know that my reply is not likely the answer you're looking for, but still, I thought it could be useful for someone. I immediately thought of 'the hero story' vs. 'the villain story', and in your case, the character that you call MC could easily be the person that everyone else sees as the villain - Hear me out; If he does try to solve the issue himself ...


2

Here are a few things I would say : adjectives : - stubby (implying he is fat, don't know if you want that) - low (old english) imagery : - "he had trouble measuring me, and had to stand on a stool" - " he look up to me to meet my eyeline as I shook his hand" - "he stood up straight to gain a few centimetres i'll edit this answer if other forms come to ...


2

Some say the best way to write about characters is to study their faces when situations are presented to them. A good example of this is Dubliners by James Joyce, for he makes excellent observations on faces. Basic facial responses to situations may disclose much about a person. In short, the way those that draw make studies of portraits with sketches may ...


2

Close your eyes, leave the keyboard alone for a bit, and imagine yourself as the character—but not at the point you're having trouble writing. If this is the first time you've immersed yourself in their head, start from the beginning. It sounds like you've got a good idea of the events that made them the way they are, so work your way through those events, ...


1

Also, when writing superheroes, some of my favorite support characters are the ones who are the non-powered spouse who are in on the hero's secrets. You don't have to have powers to be awesome in a superhero story. You don't even have to physically fight. I would suggest that you make this person a INTJ type on the Meyers-Brigg test (AKA The Masterminds) ...


1

You could think "How would I respond in this scenario?" and then do the exact opposite. You could give your mean character a behavioral pattern that is simple to you but deeply engrained and maybe complex to them. All their knee-jerk reactions follow this track (maybe they always defend themselves, or always roll their eyes, as a result of their pattern of ...


1

For me the primary way to write any character (or to write parts of a character) that are different than myself is to study that archetype in films and in person and in books, sometimes letters even. I also give my characters personality types according to multiple personality type tests (I find Enneagram the most useful but also use Myers Briggs and Life ...


1

The question boils down to the following: "How do I learn to use language efficiently, be imaginative, and become a successful writer?". Forgive me for saying this, but this is way too vague. There is a reason why writers need real life experience before they proceed to write. I find it hard to write mean characters for the same reason: I am a good person. ...


1

You say sci-fi but don't state an allowable level of technology. If your MC's physical body is restrained in an airtight isolation ward, is there any chance they could be neurally interfaced to an avatar that acts as their physical representation out in the world? If the MC is going to need to travel to other star systems then the underlying technology would ...


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