14

Power corrupts, but it doesn't have to: For an interesting reference, you might want to check out THIS question. What you are describing is ANY power dynamic. The relationship is no different to one where one spouse earns a lot more than the other, where one has family influence and connections and the other doesn't, or where one spouse is a police officer ...


12

Short answer: No. I'm a Black person, and I think I can tell you from a literary and minority standpoint that this isn't racist. 1) Fire Flame-like palettes have always gone well with darker skin tones. It's just a visually appealing design. Also, people who are darker-skinned tend to have higher tolerance for heat. Having chosen a darker skin tone for a ...


8

In our world domestic violence is a real problem. However there are also a lot of tall, muscular, 90 kg men who never harm their small, petite, 60 kg wives/girlfriends in any way. Don't see why (the majority of) your super-powered humans couldn't behave the same way.


6

In my opinion, the best way to cement two names together in a reader's mind is to have the narrative describe him one way while a character describes him another way. "Is that you, Odainat?" "Yes," Odaenathus said. Obviously, make it less forced than that, but the important thing is to tie the names together in the same passage.


5

he is called "Odainat" by most including his wife, but on official Roman business he uses the name "Odaenathus." Mention it the first time that Roman officials converse with him. "Hail, Odaenathus! How fare thee? some polite small talk The locals call you Odainat, I hear. Is that true?"


4

It's done all the time: I wouldn't worry too much about this. Characters leave the main story all the time and pop up later - sometimes whole books later. At that point, you need to be sure they are tied back in (especially if they had a mysterious death or the like). But readers accept it. That's not your question, though. If you want to emphasize that the ...


4

What is 'better' is entirely subjective. You need to consider what your story looks like, and at what powerful point you want to begin telling it. It will affect so much about how it will ultimately come across. There is little point describing a normal day in their lives and then kill them, because most modern readers (and editors) won't let you get to that ...


3

Origin Story: Lots of people are self-centered and deeply opinionated as teens, so we all start out that way. Plus, we take attitudes from our authority figures, friends, parents, and other family. I'm not sure how old the character is, but in this aspect, the younger the better. Give them a 'justification' for why they are the way they are. But also why ...


3

This is really a POV question. Are the updates to character B's life known and important to character A, the current POV character? If "yes," you report on them, if "no," you don't. If character A is self-centered, or if character B is not a significant person in their life, then they might not care. If character B is very important to ...


3

Only if there is intent to do so: I think you're overthinking this. They aren't human and that gives you leeway. By a racist logic the Drow might be considered racist since they were always vile. You're emphasizing their skill and ability, and as long as you're sensitive about explaining the back-story, I think you're fine. You could even have the MC be ...


3

Look to Cyberpunk: This depends on how close to realistic you want to be. The more realistic you want the portrayal of internet culture, the more specific you must be. At that point, you MUST date the behavior of your MC and risk irrelevance. I would read some vintage cyberpunk. The oldest stuff was even written by people with little understanding of actual ...


3

To answer you concisely: don't worry about it. As long as you're not actually copying the character of Roth, you shouldn't have any problem. Plenty of people with the same name in the world!


2

I know several people from China living in English speaking areas and having two completely different given names. No relation between those names and often people know them by one or the other name. And sometimes they also use different family names, like a widow might use her (former) married name with some people and her maiden name with others, and those ...


2

I would suggest using the names when appropriate and, if the character is POV, introduce him to the readers using the name he would prefer the readers to call him. To give a modern example, if I was writing about a character with the name "James Tiberius Kirk", he would use different names with different people. James Tiberius Kirk is his legal ...


2

This technique of storytelling is much more common than may seem, essentially I've seen 3 main ways of doing it: Time continues, the next chapter opens by picking up where the story left of. Time goes back, the next chapter opens by repeating the episode changing POV. Time goes back farther than the previous episode, here you are displacing the reader ...


2

So this is a rather complicated question to untangle, because while representation is undoubtedly a good thing if it's done too heavy handed it reads like checking off diversity boxes rather than writing good character that happen to belong to under-represented groups. In my post-apocalyptic story To echo what another poster said, how post-apocalyptic are ...


2

It's up to you, but I would say yes, it is a plot distraction. Personally, that would throw me off. I would be asking, "Could the dogs have significance? Should I remember them? When really I should be focused on the actual story. But, like Alexander pointed out in a comment, it kind of depends on the rules of your science fiction world. If talking ...


2

I'd advise you to proceed with caution. First, how likely is your audience to recognize the cameo or easter egg? If you expect the audience of the two works to overlap almost completely, then this might be fine. They'll either read your current story first and get a kick out of recognizing the character (although they might still expect her to play a bigger ...


2

In a perfect world, this wouldn't be an issue, but unfortunately there's a long history of characters --in both realistic and fantasy-based settings --being "color-coded" according to a "lighter skinned = better, more moral, virtuous, good" and "darker skinned = worse, more immoral, evil" system. It's even encoded in our ...


2

I think, that the partner of "Hulk" may be "mundane" with "superpower" of totally different kind - say higher than usual empathy and insight to (and undertanding for ) the protagonists hidden weak points (childhood abuse, sources of insure, why they are overcompenzating by Hulkiness ... ). Not superhuman empathy/understanding, ...


2

It sounds like an interesting idea. Usually with something of this sort, there's no answer possible based just on the concept, it's all about the execution. I don't think there's necessarily anything confusing about it. In this case, I think the key challenge will be to a) build sympathy for the initial hero AND then successfully shift those sympathies to ...


2

You say you don't want to switch POVs between the two characters. I can see why, and I agree that it would probably hint at the final twist. This is kind of a difficult situation, but there's always a way around it. The two obvious options are to either ignore the haters and do what you were gonna do with switchign the POV at the end, or switch the POV ...


2

Unequal pairings are hugely frowned upon in real life (examples such as teacher-student or boss-employee relationships), and as a result a relationship like this is not seen as cutesy by modern audiences and they will not root for it This isn't necessarily true, power imbalance was a central theme in Fifty Shades of Grey (if there's money involved the ...


2

Either way could work well. I have read novels in which a character dies inn the first chapter, even inn the opening scene, and the repercussions of that death are a major driver of the plot. David Weber's Mutineer's Moon is an example that comes to mind. Another is the killing of King Brion in the first chapter of Kurtz's novel Deryni Rising. The ...


2

Be a good Kalkiite! It sounds like you are NOT trying to use the Roth character as a base. So you are golden. There are millions of Michaels, Stevens (in all variations) and even hundreds of Roths, Rothmans, and Rothschilds. You have nothing to worry about. But even if you were influenced by the original Roth, you still could - by transforming the way the ...


1

Preface "Why?!" shout Sam and turned Alex around. There was no resistance. Probably. Probably was not, judging from the body posture. But it had no meaning anyway. The question echoed through the dark road and no answer followed. Just a cold moon shined high on the sky and blue neon reflected on tears flowing over Alex face. Each drop was a blue, ...


1

Simple, don’t write the story where the more powerful turns the other into a disposable object. Because that’s the logical end of that line of thinking. Use them, turn them into mush or dust, get a replacement. Being able to physically kill the other person isn’t, in the real world, a factor, nor is it a factor if they can’t. In most relationships both ...


1

I agree with Chirs Sunami, it's all about the execution. I think the main point of confusion will be the POV and role switch. To fix this, I would do something similar to the Kane chronicles when the POV switches. The Kane chronicles uses a different chapter when the POV switches and makes it very clear who the POV is by listing their name on the chapter ...


1

Where did she get her views? Was she raised in a certain way, growing up in an environment where people shared these outdated views? Readers are more likely to forgive a characters's prejudice if they understand where it's coming from. If she was influenced in this way by her parents or guardians, this will also automatically create conflict, leading to the ...


1

Big changes often come because of people we know or believe in. You can achieve this by creating personality conflict(s) between her and her best friend/co-worker/parents/siblings/lover/someone she comes to know better as the story progresses... you get the point, but don't create too many conflicts with different people as that will put her in too much of ...


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