37

Power trios are often "Freudian trios." One of the best arguments I've seen about the psychology of power trios is that each trio has a character that loosely represents Freud's psychoanalytic theory of mind. That is, there is one character each for the id, superego and ego, where the id character is impulsive, emotional, and/or primarily driven ...


9

In my opinion, there are three types of side characters: 'Throwaway characters.' These are the random people- shopkeepers, guards and innocent bystanders. They don't always need a name, but if they do have one, either (depending on the complexity of your worldbuilding) give them a name related to their place of origin, or just go on a random generator ...


5

My experience has been to concentrate on the story - first and foremost. That is what drives the success or failure of any kind of fiction. So, as you create each new character, if a name fails to materialize immediately, you might try labeling the first unnamed character as "AAA," the second as "BBB," and so on. This will temporarily ...


4

I recommend a book or a website designed for naming a baby. I have found them very useful, especially for minor characters.


3

To me it depends on how important I think this side character would be. If it's a shop owner, worker, a throw away character for a one line in a battle, or the human roadblock stopping my character for that scene I may not give them a full name but a generic first name for the region my characters are in. My regions are loosely based off of actual countries ...


2

Write the switch-over, and then refer to the individual by the name of the active personality. That, or assign a group noun that all the personalities will respond to (e.g. if they treat each other as sisters, then the surname may be a common factor, "Miss Watevachezcauwd") If this is a Third Person narrative (either omniscient or limited but with ...


2

I would write... "My name is Eben - who are you?" inquired the old man. "I'm Suoti," the younger girl replied. You can dodge the question of identity by referring to the body's physical characteristics until it's apparent that the one body hosts multiple personalities.


2

Your best bet is to read from the start by putting yourself in the MC shoes and see if while you are reading if you get more of a reaction out of one girl then the other. Another option is to consider where you want the MC and the girls to be like by the end. If you have an end point in mind for each you can chose the girl who matches better with how the MC ...


1

Not necessarily a recommendation for you, but a clever idea Anthony Trollope could get away with. His barrister is Mr Chaffanbrass. His generic farmer is Greenacres. The classy London doctor is Sir Omicron Pie. His rival potential prime ministers are Mr Brock (e.g. badger) and Lord de Terrier.


1

For side characters I try to get along with a common name or without a name; sometimes people can be referenced by their profession only, sometimes by a feature or habit. Example: There is "the bird-watcher" who can be seen every day in a park and who has witnessed something. Later in the story, they can be referenced again as the bird-watcher ...


1

I suggest a definition for "mysteriousness": Character's implied ability to substantially affect the plot without explicitly revealing their motives, values or specific ways to produce this effect.


1

Firstly, I would say black or describe him physically, e.g., copper-colored skin (or however you imagine the character in your head). Secondly, a few replies here suggest not mentioning race at all. I would argue the opposite. It's important to (if it's accurate to the setting of your story) represent diversity. The example from the Hunger Games was an ...


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