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Well, depending on your compromise, you could go the easy way and just take what you known about the job, movies and other stories stereotypes surrounding it, and do your best. From there, you could actually investigate about the job more, maybe looking some doccumentary about hows actually that job. Those can be really helpful. And finally, you could simply ...


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There is a perfect pair of exercises in the Progymnasmata syllabus I use in my own practice as a teacher that would help you shape and craft this piece of writing. The exercises focus on either giving a speech of praise (the Encomium task) or a speech of blame (the Invective task). The exercises both follow the same structure and generally have eight ...


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There are three approaches you could take: First, and a good choice for minor characters, is not to flesh them out much. Don't describe their clothes. Don't give them a distinct way of speaking or a notable hobby that the text spends time on. In this way, no reader will think "what prosecutor would wear that?" (or say that or do that etc.) ...


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Research the character traits of men who grew up in a dysfunctional family, then put those traits into the context of your story so it advances the plot in some relevant way. Think carefully whether you want the reader to see those traits as mannerisms (shoulder shrug, body language, frown...) or hear (read) them as dialog between your main character and one ...


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