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A Few Thoughts: I've seen a number of stories (especially mystery novels) where a character is portrayed as clever, a genius, or a Hannibal Lecter-type evil genius. Here is what I've seen works. Some of these might be slightly contraindicated. They are treated unfairly: To have an everyman who is highly intelligent, discriminate against them. Teachers ...


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For many people, the story plays out like a movie in their head as they read. If you don't "cast" a face into the role quickly, they'll have already filled it with their own imagination. Within a few sentences of introducing a new character, stories tend to describe the important characteristics you'd notice if you saw them on screen to avoid ...


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Do it early, if at all. People usually form their impressions of a character based on the first time they see them enter the story, and if you don't describe them there the image won't stick in their mind. But later, about six chapters in, another character mentions that she has red hair. Will this disrupt the mental image that readers have already formed ...


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As I see it, you have been inspired by the original characters and toys to create something uniquely your own. In my opinion that is not copyright infringement but part of the normal creative process.


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Additionally, the character is an amnesiac runaway, so I cannot easily do things like show their non-white relatives, have them describe experiences relating to a specific east Asian culture, have them offhandedly use phrases in another language, or even use their first or last name to show that they are biracial. E.g., Anne Boonchuy from Amphibia is Thai-...


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In order to show this character is intelligent, you have to show that this character in areas that let him shine. In particular in his home environment. For instance, if he lived on the edge of wilderness he might be able to see -- at a glance -- that you shouldn't walk somewhere because the lack of animal tracks betray that the footing is bad. The "...


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Interesting question. In a text, it is difficult to mention things subtly, whereas in a movie, you can show things without giving away their meaning. For example, if there is an axe hanging on the wall in the movie, someone may or may not be beaten to death with it later. In the book, on the other hand, the reader would expect something to happen to it if it ...


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Some possibilities/ideas you can tinker with: Give your character hobbies or attributes that are unique to who they are. This often shows them in a light where they are knowledgeable about the topics in which they actually care about. For instance, if the character was extremely knowledgeable on, say, football, make part of the journey having to do with ...


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A series is a weave: If your story is still in the outline stage, I think you're all right. If you have a plan, then as you go along in the story, you can allude to a person who will pop up later. Reference them and their relevant background in snippets as you go through the stories. So there is a chapter in each book referring to Bob in New Hope city. Maybe ...


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If the loss of that character proves to be very tragic for the rest, you might consider having him or her die before page one of book one. Then, the rest of the characters start off devastated and have to work through their grief before admitting another into their ranks. The story of the deceased character could be told via flashbacks, fond memories, ...


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As well as describing the red hair early as the other answers suggest I'd also advise describing it explicitly. Don't feel obligated to add in all your character's other physical traits as well, if the red hair is the only trait that is relevant make it the only one you describe. Otherwise the reader may not pick up on it. For example I was reading a story ...


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