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Is it "permissable", for purposes of my novel, to create a second daughter? Yes, that is called historical fiction. Given the time, the daughter could be an illegitimate child of Grand Duke Vladimir; it was not unusual in the 1870-ish time frame for royalty to have affairs with multiple women, including servants of their own house or in the houses they ...


3

Interesting intrigue. When YOU write about the 2 characters, you should willingly mislead the reader by calling them John and Mike But be careful when the story characters talk to them, avoid to call them directly by their name, if both of them keep the secret. I presume that both of them will "play the game", in order not to have problems in their new ...


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So generally there is a tier of characters and how many you should have. Hero/Perspective Character- There should be only one of these, though it's not a hard rule and not necessarily required either. This should be the character through who's "eyes" the audience witnesses the story. If the story is first person, it's the narrator's character, if the ...


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No one says you have to classify your characters, your characters are there to support the plot and overall story, how they do so is pedantic. Let's take Game of Thrones as an example, here we have a very large cast of characters. We couldn't possibly have the same show without Daenyris, so she's absolutely a main character. At the same time, we couldn't ...


2

Yes if you watch stories like Star Wars of Game of Thrones, there is multiple main characters. Maybe most of the characters are important to the overall intrigue. In a more classic way you could use a list of kind of people to structure your story : protagonist aka main(s) character. Can be a hero or an anti-hero deuteragonist (can be a sidekick or a main ...


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It's generally fine for minor characters to be shallow, especially if their impact on a scene is minimal, and putting more effort into your main characters than your side characters is perfectly normal. However, when you say: Really I just need him to get in the way of my protagonist in minor situations. ...that's a bit more worrying. If you don't have ...


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You should refer to the character based on your POV character, who would be the eyes and ears of the audience. If this is third person, John and Mike would be known through their relationship with a POV character (David). If your narrator is first person either as a character in a scene or reporting the details, this will follow the character's natural ...


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Can there be more than one main character? Absolutely! can their be a protagonist and other main characters that the story focuses on? Yep, and that sounds like what you are describing in your "Lisa" example - there's one key protagonist (Lisa) but the other main characters are also significant in the story, primarily because of how they exist in order ...


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