26

Different people get different things from a story If you think of the audience (or potential audience) for a story like a crowd of people sitting and watching as a tv show is being filmed, not every person in that audience is there for the same reason. Some people are a fan of the star actor, some people are there because their kid is into this sort of ...


17

God Syndrome: What does Superman from the 1950's look like today? No hero or villain can stop him. He's invincible. So what do you do if you're a bad guy, and have to deal with that? What happens when lily-white conservative Ultra-gal, who's 200 years old and doesn't look a day over 20, starts beating up ethnic minorities and the LGBTQ+ community for their '...


11

Check out the superhero franchise One Punch Man, so named because the main character could defeat all his opponents in one punch. He is clearly overpowered. But many people still found the series interesting, with the consensus on Rotten Tomatoes given as "With its state-of-the-art animation, unorthodox hero, and gut-bustlingly funny jabs at the shounen ...


6

As a huge Superman fanboy, I hear this alot, especially with Batman fans, but I always have my counter ready. In all stories (canon or else-world) the villains will always use Superman's greatest weakness against him. Few villains rarely go for this weakness intentionally, and even fewer are aware of it, but it's been part of Superman lore from the very ...


4

A matter of Definitions: You get into a murky realm when you start saying "protagonist" and counter that to "villain." I read a book series called The Messiah Stone, in which the protagonist is completely amoral, and it's fun watching them chase after the artifact in the book with amoral dedication. It's got great action, problems to ...


4

Don't fight the allusions to colonialism, lean into them. 100% morally flawless protagonists are just as boring as 100% morally despicable antagonists. Acknowledge that not everything in the "good guy" empire is all fine and dandy. When you feel that what they are doing is similar to colonialism, do your research on why colonialism is generally ...


3

Here are a couple of examples of possible problems a strong or magical person might face: There is a question: https://scifi.stackexchange.com/questions/131328/has-a-klingon-ever-been-head-butted-to-any-effect-by-a-non-klingon[1] One answer mentions a scene where a Klingon head butts Data and hurts his head on Data's super strong head. And my answer mentions ...


3

Short answer, is you don't include everyone's dialogue. While it's tempting to have every character have their moment of pride where they get to talk, it's far more common that they react instead. One of them gasps, another places her hand on her heart. Another faints, one of drops their mouth... The Malazan Book of the Fallen might be something to read to ...


3

Connection is important Your notion that the two stories don't connect is problematic. I think some kind of connection is important. The two stories need to have enough connections that they can authoritatively answer the question; why are we seeing both stories, and why are they in the same book and not in a book each? It doesn't have to be more than a ...


3

Personally, I believe that it would seem kind of weird in the same story, and if they do not overlap/are completely separate, I would not recommend writing about them in the same book, but here are some options you can do if you want to include them both. Write them as two separate stories and note that they take place in the same world (mention characters ...


3

Controversy and Emotion: There are lots of publications about industrialization and colonialism, and it's a really complex topic. If you want your writing to have a plausible feel, not just a pat anticolonial one, you have to embrace the complexity of the situation. I read a controversial but well written article suggesting colonialism was a net benefit for ...


2

The reader doesn't know what the character's personality is like until the character does, says, feels, or thinks something. After the character does, says, feels, or thinks enough things, the reader may have a fairly complete idea of their character. But neighter the writer nor the reader will have a totally complete knowledge of the personality of the ...


2

Characters may change in some situations As already said, it depends a lot on the situation and what you want to go through. But a very important thing to be aware of is: the character is two people, the person he appears to be, and the person he really is. This applies to everyone. It is in moments like this, in moments of pressure, that the characters show ...


2

Colonialism isn't a moral issue (on the scale of a nation) Historically, colonialism has never ended because of moral reasons. It was always a power struggle : The colony becoming strong enough to claim its independence. The colonizers becoming unable to control their colony (too weak, too strong opponents, etc) The most powerful faction within the ...


2

No, but there's a fine line Look, it's your story. If you think that the story needs to be told, tell it. Just know that, there's a fine line. Your characters are allowed to be horrible people with horrible views (such as racism), but you aren't. When you're writing a story to get a political point across, you've crossed the line. Also, please don't write ...


2

The comics have covered this a number of times over the past eighty years. The "simple" solution is to make the overpowered condition the protagonist's main problem. Superman can't have a girlfriend/wife (no matter how lonely he is, as the last living member of his people), because physical intimacy between a Kryptonian (with Superman's powers) ...


2

The site ArtBreeder it's just what you need. It basically lets you create all kinds of imagery by AI. One of the options is for portraits. You can take some of the million random portraits included or upload your own pics to mix them and generate new ones combining their facial traits. You can also configure what each -parent- pic contributes to the -...


2

The reason film scripts are very upfront about it is because the final product, the film, is not: Though explicit in writing, the film doesn't need to be upfront about it, as everyone can see that they are of Asian descent, for example. Scripts are also only used as a sort of guiding stone for the director, editor, cinematographer, actors, casting director, ...


2

There are many different ways in which an overpowered main character can be interesting. Just of the top of my head: He could struggle with his powers, not knowing how to use them, which purposes to use them for, face ethical dilemmas and questions of "I could, but should I?". His powers could be a burden as much as a gift, especially if he cannot ...


2

The Christopher Reeves Superman was, perhaps, the most powerful presentation of a super being in cinematic history. He effortlessly lifts a tectonic plate, for instance and brushes off nuclear weapons like so many water balloons. He has, in addition to his regularly recognized powers, the ability to turn invisible, to use high-level telekinesis, and to ...


1

Whilst it lies on a spectrum, I would say that there are two main types of story with an "overpowered" character, those in which their power solves the storys main problems and those in which it does not. In a story where a characters power does not solve their issues it is arguable if they even qualify as overpowered. In One Punch Man, there is no ...


1

There is one recurring theme of the "overpowered main character" (OMC) I've noticed. The OMC tends to be so foreign or alien to the people or world around them, that they don't understand how to apply their power to get the outcomes they desire. So the story ends up focusing less on "will OMC be strong enough to make this happen?" and ...


1

The closest thing I can come up with is an unfree, AI-generated face library. Seeing that this is a paid service, I doubt that there is some free service for this purpose, that does it better.


1

Timeline overlap. A scene can be wrote numerous times from different perspectives giving rise to different voices. So a banquette with event x at the end, could have six or seven repeated timelines with different points of view up to the event x. A good example of this was Milan Kundera's 'Unbearable Lightness of Being'. IIR he even had one section where he ...


1

If you have to ask whether you're promoting Colonialism with your writing, you already know the answer; of course you're promoting Colonialism. Don't write the story. The only thing you can do now is give up all ambitions to be a writer and never put pen to paper again. Although, I fear the problem here is deeper than that. You appear to be guilty not ...


1

Suffering is Drama (and transformation): Unfortunately, I think this might fall into the "Asking what to write" category of questions. Answering "what should I do?" isn't something we can say. So I'll try to address this in a general way, keeping away from specifics. If you are asking more generally about how humans behave in high-stress ...


1

So given your response in the comments, this actually comes off quite easier than most times people ask this question. You are confusing nationality with ethnicity which is not the same thing. Your character may be a citizen of Japan. They may even be the child of immigrants to Japan and themselves gave your character a Japanese sounding name... if the ...


1

It is possible, but be careful Basically, "Can you tell a story without a protagonist" is not the same thing as "Should you write a story without a protagonist" Meaning: Is it possible to have a story without a protagonist? Absolutely. It's done all the time, just do some quick googles to find examples of this. Normally, it's a smaller ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible