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I don't know if this will help you or not, but here are some insights I've picked up from reading material that has tried to do (and in some cases done it by accident) what you are trying to do. Let's start with real life insanity that led to incredible literary work; Phillip K Dick. This is a man who struggled his entire life to get out of what he thought ...


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I think you're on the right track with the "compensating" for their flaws, in combination with actual growth. As for compensation, this can be external factors. Look at the character of Alexander Hamilton from the musical Hamilton. This is a character that "leaps before he looks" and needs to learn to wait for the right moment like the antagonist of the ...


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Honestly, most of the previous answers are going to be better than what I am going to give. It's the whole dichotomy between getting what you want versus getting what you need. You asked how to avoid basing the character on yourself, but (to echo the room here) is that it's okay to have a character or plot that is to some degree based on yourself, your life, ...


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This is a big, important question. After all characters must be distinct and unique or else they are no longer characters, but rather bland, amorphous machines whose actions can only be explained by a need to advance the plot. On the other hand, characters changing and growing is vital to plot; otherwise why do we the reader care about them? Sidenote here, ...


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DISCLAIMER: I won't say tl;dr, but I will say Too long; I skimmed. Love your thoroughness though. A few ideas of mine (take or leave): You could spread out when each character has their "AHA" moment. Maybe one guy has improved himself fundamentally, but this only deepens the core flaw of his girlfriend because of their dynamic. She'll have to wait longer ...


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This is a good article explaining the differences between two archetypes of antagonist in story: the monster and the villain. Since you want this dark lard to be purely dark and no human is purely dark, it sounds like you want a monster. The thing about monsters is that they are inherently not relatable, not human. Things that can be capitalized on with a ...


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The answer to your question depends heavily on how you learn. There are hundreds of books on how to write fiction. Podcasts, blogs, and YouTube videos round out the resources. As a retired engineer, I like lots of structure and, thus, focus on outlining, planning, and world building. Others, and from the contents of your question you might be one of them, ...


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Look for the difference between pantser and plotter, it should teach you a lot. Is this a method others use? Yes! As I understand it, you are a pantser. You're basically planting seeds and watching them grow into a beautiful story. Some planning won't hurt your writing, but since it's your first attempt I wouldn't recommend it yet. Changing your habits ...


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That's how I've written my draft version of forced possession mine isn't ritualistic like yours but it is none the less a total violation beyond what human minds can truly fathom it's going into and destroying things that aren't yet given language indefinable in some ways its worse. To write it from the character POV and the demon's POV made the scenes ...


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I would suggest that you write the doll as if she has dialog like a normal character and have her "talk" while you are writing. I call this the "Groot Script" after a leak from Avengers: Infinity War directors reveal that in any Marvel Cinimatic Universe film that features the character of Groot, who speaks a language where the only dialog is "I am Groot" (...


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This really comes down to point of view. If you are writing a first-person narrative (from the point of view of the girl), or a third-person close-perspective narrative (also from the point of view of the girl), you will need to provide the doll's dialog, because you are in the protagonist's head, and will see and hear things the way the protagonist does. ...


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The doll's dialogue can be italicized, no quotes. Thoughts are often treated this way, so it seems like an understandable style for a silent "speaker."


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I think this is quite complicated and if you try to extend this kind of communication over time it may appears repetitive for the reader (that's why R2D2 does not "speak" too much. maybe 4 to 5 times per film). That's being said, my approach to your problem would be: "text here" -said the girls trying to answer the question she thought the doll was asking ...


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A strong character has two elements: Its motivation, as revealed through its choices, and Its personality, as revealed through its dialogue and body language. So let's talk about how those apply to this situation! You AI's Motivation What does your AI want? Perhaps it just wants to keep the player from dismantling it. But I suspect it goes deeper than ...


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