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How do I emphasize a sentence without making it seem like the character is shouting?

Make the body language and facial expressions lean more towards the emotion the words would otherwise convey.
user64474's user avatar
1 vote

How do I emphasize a sentence without making it seem like the character is shouting?

Use staccato language for the person who is angry. It's like yelling without raising your voice. Check it out. Just one word sentences. Stewart stepped into the office of his boss. "Hey, Cheryl ...
raddevus's user avatar
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1 vote

How do I emphasize a sentence without making it seem like the character is shouting?

Character A looked down, then looked up to the heavens as if praying "Lord, give strength". He toyed with the paperknife. Then he looked at Character B. "Blah blah blahhhhh blah blah ...
Simon Crase's user avatar
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How do I emphasize a sentence without making it seem like the character is shouting?

Put the last sentence of the lead-up paragraph on its own line. The forced pause wakes the reader up. AAA AAA, BBB too! And C. And D. And E. From my own profile (not here): In my cozy cave, I was ...
Jess Fuckett's user avatar
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How do I emphasize a sentence without making it seem like the character is shouting?

If you go the route of conveying sternness (at least partly) by words, one way may be to adjust the phrasing, changing from "normal mode" to "stern mode". For example, if A does ...
Pablo H's user avatar
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8 votes

How do I emphasize a sentence without making it seem like the character is shouting?

One possible technique is to give only that sentence in direct quotation. Mr. Jones sat at his desk, steepled his fingers together, and sternly discussed the importance of rules and the bad example ...
Mary's user avatar
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8 votes

How do I emphasize a sentence without making it seem like the character is shouting?

Generally, typographic techniques -- using bold, or italics, or both, or changing fonts -- are the least effective methods because they are very subjective. The stronger techniques are to either ...
EDL's user avatar
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2 votes

How do I emphasize a sentence without making it seem like the character is shouting?

You need to accept that we cannot emulate all the variances of intonation that we find in spoken language in written text. In conventional fiction we only have unemphasized text (like this) and ...
Ben's user avatar
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1 vote

How do I emphasize a sentence without making it seem like the character is shouting?

+1 Divizna; italics is good. You can also use punctuation to add texture to the speech. "Blah, bu-blah blah blah. Blahhhh!"
Amadeus's user avatar
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4 votes

How do I emphasize a sentence without making it seem like the character is shouting?

A common typographical mark of emphasis is italics. An advantage of italics is that it isn't generally read as shouting.
Divizna's user avatar
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1 vote

Character is called by their initials. Do I spell it out?

1 The Chicago Manual of Style recommends: [In dialogue,] if the pronunciation of the abbreviation would be understood by most readers, you can write it as you normally would: “I’m going to the store, ...
Ben's user avatar
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0 votes

Character is called by their initials. Do I spell it out?

The standard for using initials is to put full stops after each letter - i.e. T.P. This could work well both in narration and dialogue, for giving the look and feel of being initials and help you or ...
komodosp's user avatar
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0 votes
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Character is called by their initials. Do I spell it out?

I think the standard initials, TP, works best for the dialogue where the character's is referred to or addressed like that. What you can then do is have TP or other characters react in certain ...
storbror's user avatar
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5 votes

Tips on writing a transgender character?

I would suggest you create a scene, an unusual first time scene for the twins, in which they are alone and happen to reveal such preferences. For eight year olds, this might be watching a kid's movie, ...
Amadeus's user avatar
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0 votes

How can I make a compelling character unlikable?

Interesting question. If I understand the question, you want the reader to initially dislike him, but over time, the reader will change her mind. Did I get that right? Why does the reader change her ...
Joseph Larson's user avatar
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When developing a stage play, whose gender matters more? The characters' or the actors'?

There is no right or wrong answer to this question. There are different viewpoints and interests that you may or may not want to consider, depending on the circumstances: A specific story may demand ...
Ben's user avatar
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0 votes

When developing a stage play, whose gender matters more? The characters' or the actors'?

I know this question is really old, but I saw it and wanted to say something for anyone who finds this question and reads it. Is the character's gender important to the story? TL;DR It depends on ...
Talbot's user avatar
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3 votes

How can I make a compelling character unlikable?

Unfairness People generally have a visceral reaction to unfair treatment. There have been studies in sociology and ethics that show that distributing rewards unfairly elicits a negative response even ...
Tom's user avatar
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1 vote

Showing that a character is unsentimental and arrogant

"Show Don't Tell" as a rule of writing originated in stage plays. The idea was, instead of a narrator or character "telling" us that Roger is a chain smoker, the playwright should ...
Amadeus's user avatar
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1 vote

Showing that a character is unsentimental and arrogant

"Unsentimental" and "arrogant" are labels that we give to certain behavior. What is unsentimental and arrogant behavior. Describe in which way your character acts that way. Don't ...
Ben's user avatar
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7 votes
Accepted

Misleading readers on the motives/true personality of a character

Misdirection You could show her doing intelligent things, but to provide plausible excuses for why it is an accident, before quickly moving the reader on to something that overshadows the event. The ...
codeMonkey's user avatar
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2 votes

Misleading readers on the motives/true personality of a character

This is easiest done if you write this character from the viewpoint of another character. That way, you don't have to somehow cloak the true personality of the queen behind her falsehoods and narrate ...
Ben's user avatar
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5 votes

Misleading readers on the motives/true personality of a character

One approach that can work is to not start her up so high. Have her play the empty-headed beauty, but she got to where she is by a circuitous route -- and she repeatedly explains this by "I was ...
Amadeus's user avatar
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0 votes

Which name do I use after my character learns his real name, given that I'm writing in third person?

It's likely that your narration follows the point of view of your protagonist, like a ghost sitting in their head and watching everything through their senses. In this style of narration, the general ...
Divizna's user avatar
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0 votes

Which name do I use after my character learns his real name, given that I'm writing in third person?

You can do both. Depending on who is referring to him in the narrative, they may use one, either, or both names. My given name is not Ash, but most people who meet me these days know me as Ash, you ...
Ash's user avatar
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