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According to this article and other sources, there are four defined stages of culture shock that you could have your character experience. You could write them in any order, but this is typically the order in which they occur in the real world. 1: The Honeymoon Stage The character falls in love with the culture. She becomes infatuated with the language, ...


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It is highly likely, that you either end up with a 2d character OR a character that people do not actually hate (or dislike). Look at it this way: If we (the readers) understand a character's motives and background, we are way more likely to relate to or at least understand (maybe even defend) that character's actions - Even if these actions are perceived as ...


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The answers above are pretty good already so I'm just adding a few extra bits. Basically, you are approaching the problem from the wrong angle: the question shouldn't be "How do I make my socially awkward character likable", but "How I make my likable character deal with a crippling behavior", if that makes any sense. One thing that could ...


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Disadvantages. Coping with them. That's it. How did they struggle through highschool with having a big nose? How do they date when ugly? How do they work if stupid? Disadvantages!


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How you add more depth to various issues related to violence that adds a level of depth in the protagonist's characterization depends first on re-phrasing passages like that. "How you add more depth to… what adds a level of depth" is through clarification or simplification, not any special technique. If your story is bland in some sections and ...


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When I started writing, I used to have these thoughts too. All my characters sound the bloody same. (Every time, I see the word 'Bloody', I am reminded of Ronald Weasley) First of all, it may not be the case. As the writer creating the story, you already know how it will map out and probably that's why everything seems to be in monotone. If your characters ...


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Making a socially anxious character is very simple in design. I myself am quite socially awkward at times. But I also enjoy engaging in social activities, have quite a few hobbies, and can speak very well when I need to. Now, Twilight, from what little I read, is very much fanfiction-esque. It features a bland protagonist that is supposed to fill in for the ...


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Disclaimer. I have not read Twilight and have no desire to. However, I'm familiar enough with the character archetype to answer the question. To write a relatable character you must first utterly convince the reader said character is a living, breathing person who existed/exists/will exist in a specific time and place. Nothing less will do. The plot will (...


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This is an awesome question and there are a lot of great ways to do this! Here are a few tips I've received from fellow authors that I really like. Consider their occupation, upbringing and background A computer scientist will speak differently, and make different references and cultural allusions, than an archaeologist or a biologist. Your grizzled ...


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I propose a two-pronged approach. The first prong is research. To understand what makes your characters tick, research what violence does to real-life people. You haven't specified what sort of violence you write about, but let's take domestic abuse as an example. You could read scientific literature on the subject, talk to survivors (if they're willing), or ...


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