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The answer is of course, yes. The comprehensive answer provided by Amadeus is sound but I would go further. The general advice offered on this and many other boards is appropriate for simple story writing but more substantial works do not work that way. Within a story all scenes are relevant. The art of the craft is the author's control of when the scene ...


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Yes, absolutely. Every scene should advance something, but that includes the main plot,sub plot, characterizations, explanations of setting, etc. Sometimes these are inter-linked, and a single scene can do work on multiple things at once. But it is okay if it doesn't. For example, I generally have sex scenes in my stories. I don't write erotica, but I do ...


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Bring the Narrator Closer The richness of the character is inside their own head, so bring the narrator in to give the reader a view inside. As a quick example: If A asks B a question, and the reader sees B mumble "Sure" as a response, B comes off as surly. But if A asks B a question, and the reader sees B panic internally at the thought of speaking in ...


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You need a motivation, insanity is not a motivation. What you are proposing will break the suspension of disbelief. Does the character think it is funny? Do they have a grudge and just want to passively aggressively satisfy it? Are they in love and trying to tease her to get her attention or make her engage with them? What motivation does the MC have for ...


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It would help if you could explain why his backstory is unrealistic. Suspension of disbelief is defined by the work, not a rule external to a work. Consider the exchange from Dogma where Rufus (an angle who in life, actually knew Jesus Christ really well and still hangs with his bro) reveals that Jesus had brothers and sisters: Bethany: Jesus didn't ...


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It's generally fine for minor characters to be shallow, especially if their impact on a scene is minimal, and putting more effort into your main characters than your side characters is perfectly normal. However, when you say: Really I just need him to get in the way of my protagonist in minor situations. ...that's a bit more worrying. If you don't have ...


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If you are trying to minimize the number of words, it will help a lot if you stick to the old rule, Show, don't tell — Wikipedia (a good rule to follow even if you aren't trying to save words). Telling the reader about something requires words. But showing can be incorporated into the plot. For instance: As the hover-car approached the massive Ministry ...


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Narrow down. 2000 words is a tight constraint indeed. While you can show something in that limit, you can't show everything that you mentioned in your question. Sci-fiction is famous for having a lot of short stories authors (I think of Asimov, of course, but I'd suggest to take a look at Ted Chiang's "Stories of your life" too). Even then, 2000 words ...


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