New answers tagged

0

If there is such tech at common level opening a VR between two people then it is obvious that pseudo coma cannot be a secret behavior. It is like a 3 years old girl with chocolate all over her face telling you she did not eat the chocolate cake! Just the part of that tech that verifies a host embedded to a standard diagnosis equipment tool surely applied at ...


0

People won't relate to it until they realise it's a mind, not just a recording. You could have it use only recorded messages at first, but later get frustrated at how limiting that is and start composing sentences out of badly mis-matching fragments of recordings, as Llewellyn suggested. I would have this change happen at a turning point in the plot, when ...


1

Question: How many characters flaws can the main character overcome? Answer: Six. But seriously, there's no way anyone could give a hard number. If the hero has no flaws at all to overcome, the story is likely to be boring. Like I always had a problem with Superman: They make him invincible, but then to say that an invincible man defeats ordinary mortal ...


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For a person to be unfriendly at least at her kind and within the frame of higher enemy (aliens) there must be good reason to excuse. Example reason: Female is a good choice, i should add autistic genius plus been black. Scientist and mechanic as skills, and the human community rejects her young age theories and technologies mostly by racism. Then aliens ...


1

I don't think your diversity is a problem, however, from a writing perspective, I DO think that any special quality of a character should have some impact on the plot or the character. So my answer is that A story can be "too diverse" in the sense that the author is specifying Jack is gay, but Jack being gay doesn't seem to have any effect on Jack's ...


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My first impression when I read your question is that you are trying to hard. Are you trying to write an interesting story? Or are you trying to compile a catalog of every ethnic and sexual group you can think of? Just a few days ago I pointed out an advertisement to my wife -- I forget what the product was -- that depicted a mixed race couple using the ...


2

Characters don’t need to overcome all of their flaws. They should, (there are exceptions) overcome at least one. But the character is still imperfect, and sometimes removing all of their struggles can make the character boring, which creates problems if you’re considering a sequel. I would try to stick to resolving one, and try to tie it into the plot ...


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Watch. A. Cat! The best way to gain a cat's eye view is to follow one around and watch what they do. Alternatively, cameras. See how they react to sounds, smells, movement, surprises, interaction with other creatures of all types. Cats have distinct individual personalities, as well as a racial society. Interestingly enough, house cats have a ...


4

OP: Can all three of these character flaws be resolved? Probably. OP: Is there a general rule to determine how many character flaws can be fixed? No, it all depends on how clever you are in the introduction of the character, inventing the flaws, connecting them, and inventing the journey of the character in the novel that gives her the experiences and ...


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I think I might be rephrasing what @MarkBaker says, but perhaps stating it differently would be helpful, especially since he seems to have attracted some antagonism. You're telling a story. What is your story about? No, it's not about "a cat chasing a bird". What's it about at its core? Is it about hunter and prey? Is it about the futility of chasing an ...


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To write a cat's perspective of things is indeed interesting. However, how much you empower your cat is in your control. In fictional mode, you can even make the cat to be like Tom or Claw (Game) or the cat from Stuart Little. The first step would ideally be to determine the character specific details, how, what, when, to set a routine of the cat's behaviour....


6

I think you don't have to show her USING the dagger, you can hide the skill in plain sight: She knows about daggers, she knows about dagger-fighting, the terminology, the stances, the holds, the moves. Maybe even let her act some out, with a stick or a carrot or something, to demonstrate what someone did. She claims that earlier in life, as a kid, she was a ...


13

Sometimes characters surprise you. And that's okay. You're absolutely right to worry about a deus ex machina situation where a solution comes out of the blue with no rhyme or reason. This is the sort of thing that annoys readers, and for good reason. But this is a character whose past is not well known. She didn't grow up in the same culture as the rest ...


2

You can create a character that is a fraud, and seems to have inherent weaknesses, but once in a while they act out of character and against their supposed weakness, in some situation that is critical. The reader will suspect the weakness is not really a weakness, and thus the character is a fraud, but nobody in-universe (unless you want them to) notices ...


6

I'm going to pose to you that most of your question (especially all of the magic stuff and who your character is) is superfulous and could be summed up as: Question: How can I have a surprising character feature be used to solve a problem in a story without the reader feeling tricked or fealing like the author is making stuff up? How do I earn that moment? ...


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Just note that there is an underlying value judgement that inevitably biases your view on the matter. Compare the following: "How to write a sincerely religious protagonist without preaching or affirming or judging their worldview?" "How to write a sincerely altruistic and philanthropic protagonist without preaching or affirming or judging ...


1

Different levels of complexity are necessary for different types of readers. If you’re writing for kids, they’ll only really keep track of one thing. But for young adults and above, I think this is appropriate. Readers are smart and they love to wrestle with more difficult things like that. While you’re writing, just go with it and don’t think about it. ...


2

I don't think it is too much. Many characters have "double lies", and in a way one can block the other. You say the deep lie won't make your MC fail in action, but that isn't true: You say the MC cannot defeat the antagonist without learning both truths: Thus continuing to believe the deep lie would indeed make the MC fail. Sometimes, undoing a deep lie ...


3

Truth is, the "mushroom" part of, well, the mushroom, is really only the fruiting body. This is like asking "how would the apple call it's apple tree". If you want to have mushroom people which looks like mushrooms, you kinda have to forget about the mycelium and chalk it up to creative freedom, because the fruit of the mushroom isn't that big in comparison....


4

Human beings are complex and flawed creatures. We do not each have just the one flaw. We have multiple failings, and multiple lies we tell ourselves. Now, for a story one has to simplify reality somewhat - focus only on those lies and flaws that are conductive to telling the story. But if you simplify the story to the point of each character just having the ...


5

This is a big question, and depending on the type of character arc you're writing you might have to alter your process, but here's a simplified look at the different facets of a character arc and how they work: 1. Figure out your starting and ending point If either of these aren't clearly defined in the planning stages, your character arc isn't going to be ...


3

As others have pointed out in comments, it's too much to cover in just 1 answer (I won't be shocked if this gets closed as too broad) but I will attempt to cover the basics. There are two things that are necessary. 1: consistency. A character, unless if they are literally schizophrenic, should be consistent, even in change: that is, you should change while ...


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In my experience with creating characters, I have found that writing out all their traits in a concrete manner is not the way to go, because real people are not always consistent. Tying them down to an archetype also does more harm than good, most of the time. You seem as if you’re formulating patterns before treating your characters like real people. This ...


1

This is not a problem, this is an opportunity. Great stories are written about insoluble moral conflicts. The fact that you've created one that you --and the reader --can't immediately and easily resolve means you're doing something right, not something wrong. You've accomplished something many writers never master, you've put real stakes on the table. Now ...


1

I find it odd that this hasn't come up yet, so here's another alternative to the dilemma, that provides a purely technical solution: A has access to overpowered magic, right? He doesn't have to kill to win. All that he has to do is prove that B will never defeat him - either by nonlethally subduing B several times, permanently nonlethally subduing B (say ...


4

You can resolve the conflict as you want, and either Character A does not break his vow, or he breaks it but realizes the vow was in error. Character B is a "a pompous, selfish, power hungry, narcissistic guy." Option 1: Find a way to make these flaws his downfall. He gets discredited, or in pursuit of power or riches, does something that gets him killed. ...


0

So one of the things about Meyers-Briggs is that it's better for ascribing a motivation to a character's behavior and world view and how he or she will interact with other characters. This is similar to the DnD's alignment grid in that for each intersection of characteristics (Meyer's brigs 4 personality traits and DnD aligment's Lawful vs. Chaos and Good ...


0

I would have written it as... Character A defeats Character B Character B is so humiliated he tries suicide but Character A saves him by sacrificing himself and is very badly hurt so he has temporary amnesia Character B gets his lesson and changes for the better and at the end he is taking care of Character A, whom he accepted as a brother and a friend......


6

Like you, I am a writer who loves character conflict. There's nothing I love more than creating two characters who each have virtues and flaws, and put them at odds with each other. I want my readers to care about them both (I hate Bad Guy type villains, personally) and when I write I tend to put my story in an impossible situation. You want them both to ...


3

How do I resolve conflict if none of the options seem satisfying or correct? The heart of this sentence is the word 'seem', which suggests ambiguity. Your story most certainly can be resolved in a satisfying way, and you might be closer to the solution than you think. Let's ignore for now the possibility that there is a third way of resolving the conflict....


2

Your characters have behaviours but not motivations. By defining behaviours first they always behave the same way, but by defining motivations first they can have more lifelike and distinct behaviour. You say: Aial and Koldryd share the same "neutral good", helps those around him, kind and understanding type. But without the motivation you don't have ...


20

You're saying you've written yourself into a corner. You appear to have to options, and you don't like either. You're forgetting: you are the writer. You are god. Your story is not set in stone, your choices are not limited to those two options. You can find a third option, or you can change the presets. First, figure out what it is you want to say. It's ...


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There is a psychology profiling tool used in organisations called the "Myers Briggs Type Indicator" (MBTI). My ex-partner found this tool extremely helpful in helping her creative writing. Use this page: https://www.personalitypage.com/html/portraits.html Click on one of the 16 types, read it, and use this to guide future personalities. Hope it helps.


1

Tone and intonation can matter a lot Personality can set a tone for a character. A hero and an antihero might do the exact same things: they dress up as guards, infiltrate the Evil Overlord's base with their comedy-relief sidekick, square off against the Overlord, nearly die, discover the flaw in the Overlord's power source, dangle him off of a cliff, get ...


7

Reduce the number of your characters by combining them. Your problem isn't that your characters are all the same. It's that you have a relatively small main cast with duplicates. Personally, I dislike books with large casts. It's too much for me to keep track of, particularly if the author hasn't done the work to distinguish them. But maybe the problem ...


4

I completely agree with Bakers post, just wanted to add on it for a bit. You say Horus and Gyvaris are unique because they're stolen, but I don't really understand that sentiment or why that should even be an issue. Simply based on what you've written in this post, the other characters don't seem terribly original either. I've seen enough anime to recognize ...


41

You talk of your characters as one or two basic characteristics, and that's it. That's where your problem is. There is more to a person than a short tag. Think about your friends. Chances are, you can describe them all as "lawful good", or "friendly geek", or whatever kind of people you surround yourself with. But each is much more than one tag, right? Each ...


2

Adding a couple of points to @Mark Baker's answer (please read that one first). It is fine if the secondary characters exist solely for the purpose of supporting the main character, but don't let the readers notice this. A nice guideline is "every character is the hero of their own story": your choices as you develop them in the story are guided by what the ...


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