8

I have seen capital letters after colons if what comes after the colon is a full sentence: These rules have only one purpose: They are meant to humiliate. If you remove the subject and verb, the word after the colon stays lowercase: These rules have only one purpose: to humiliate.


8

As far as I've ever seen, no. You don't capitalize the word following a colon, unless it's a proper name.


7

After reviewing several recipe web sites created by corporate media groups and Internet startups, it is clear that, in general, recipe ingredients are not capitalized, but a few online style guides do say to capitalize the first letter of an ingredient name. I see a lot more lower case ingredient names and don't recall seeing initial capitalizations. There ...


7

Capitalizing a pronoun gives it proper noun status or deity status. So writing It means either that the thing's name is literally It, like Stephen King's monster, or you're referring to a god the way the Abrahamic religions refer to Yahweh as Him even in the middle of a sentence. Therefore, if the creature has an actual name, like Gormenghast or Voldemort ...


7

No, is not needed capitalize a word after a colon. Same as spanish. I want the following: butter, sugar, and flour. Read here the rules: http://www.grammarbook.com/punctuation/colons.asp


7

Quick answer: the descriptor should be lowercase for Steinway, and uppercase plural for Taylor. Rationale: Full titles of institutions and companies and the names of their departments and divisions are capitalized, but such words as school or company, as well as generic or descriptive terms are lowercased when used alone. Chicago Manual of Style,...


4

You don't capitalize the dialogue tag she said or she laughed if it's attached to your dialogue. You would only capitalize She laughed if it's a new thought. So: "Do you know where we are going?" she said. "We're going to Albuquerque," he responded. "Seraphina!" the dark Persian man cried. BUT "Do you know where we are going?" She ...


4

I know this is an old article; however, I came across this and wanted to add something. While it may seem illogical or that there isn't a right or wrong answer, you must remember the focus is to make the document grammatically correct. Your question can best be answered by revisiting the basic definition of a proper noun. While we would say "figure(s)" is a ...


4

Vampire is not a unique concept and thus does not need capitalization. If "vampires" are of the unique Kizzard Clan then they would. Proper titles like Vampire King should be capitalized as they refer to a specific individual or group of individuals who held that Specific Title (The President or The Presidents of the United States but not "a president of a ...


4

If you want to get published, the latter style is not acceptable. Follow the standard convention. Just Google for "Formatting Dialogue", look for sources related to written fiction (as opposed to script writing or academic or business or legal writing). When I did that I found the following most popular hits: First Manuscript Self-Publishing School ...


3

Here's the best explanation of whether you need brackets, from the CMOS website: The brackets are obligatory only if the capitalization is part of the subject under discussion, which is rare outside of legal or textual criticism documents. (This matches up with what the book says, which is quoted here.) Also, CMOS style says to not use an ellipsis at ...


3

Another thing to consider is the context. For instance, you might be "passing the time by hanging out" or you might be "subjected to the whims of Time". In the former example, time is an object. In the latter example, time is more like an entity... much like how people may refer to "Death", "Life", "Truth", etc. as opposed to "death", "life", "truth", etc. ...


3

All caps has come to mean shouting. You can have a voice which is harsh but not loud. So no, I wouldn't use all caps to mean something which is difficult to listen to. Describe it as "harsh" and let your readers imagine what that sounds like.


3

From the sources I've found, capitalizing sounds is optional, and is generally NOT done for sounds made by human beings. It seems to be a stylistic choice, not a hard-and-fast rule: https://medium.com/@alli_unger/6-things-to-capitalize-in-your-screenplay-a445e0678aa3 https://gointothestory.blcklst.com/question-what-about-capitalizing-sounds-in-spect-...


3

No, you don't capitalize those. Capitalization is for emphasis, so make sure you use it very sparingly to draw the audience's attention to SOMETHING very important.


3

(This construction is a pain in the ass to punctuate, so this is a good question to ask.) When your narration is a full sentence, it must be punctuated like a full sentence. With M-dashes: “She’s a lovely girl, but — ” He lowered his voice. “ — she cannot dance for the life of her.” “She’s a lovely girl, but — ” He took a puff of his cigarette. “ — she ...


3

It depends on whether you want the word to come across as specific, in which case you would capitalize, versus a general word, in which case you don't capitalize. To explain what I mean, consider if I referred to "the Queen," versus "the queen." The former suggests that I am referring to a specific queen, with a specific title and ...


2

Hyphens indicate a compound adjective: a do-it-yourself project. The hyphens are to let the reader know that all the hyphenated words belong to one thought. If you're using capitals to denote a proper name, the hyphens are unnecessary. The caps make it a unit.


2

I'm pretty sure those are verbs, not sounds. They are "human actions which make sounds", but are not sounds themselves. So even though I am not expert in screenwriting, I would say no.


2

Lots of opinions here, but let's look to a higher authority. According to the Chicago Manual of Style, the word after a colon is lowercase, even if it starts a complete sentence, unless it's a proper noun. The exception is when the colon introduces multiple sentences or when it introduces speech.


2

Two possible approaches. Before you start typing your text. You can set up a list of auto-complete words. From Project -> Project Settings -> autocomplete. After you typed. You can use the find command in Edit -> Find. Set the Find Options to Regular Expressions (regex). Place the desired Regular expression in the top box, and Slime Monster in the lower box....


2

Only if Krypton is a proper noun, and then only Krypton, not experiment. The krypton experiment was used as a source – if krypton is an element. The Krypton experiment was used as a source – if based on the process of Professor Krypton. Compare: the Stanford prison experiment Capitalization exceptions are the title of a paper or film or software, or ...


2

Most ingredients start with a number (1 cup flour), so they don't need to be capitalized, but if the ingredient starts with a letter (Salt to taste), it should be capitalized. See Virginia Tech's How to Write a Recipe


2

You mention a 'semicolon' but then (correctly) use a colon. A colon is nearly always preceded by a complete sentence; what follows the colon may or may not be a complete sentence, and it may be a mere list or even a single word. British usage: no capital letter after a colon unless it is to start a proper noun or acronym. American usage: a capital letter if ...


1

For standard dialogue tags, it makes no sense. Said John. does not make any sense by itself. However, a character action in between dialogue does make sense by itself: "Hello." John tilted his hat.


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