6

I liked this question - writing letters is a professional use of writing skills, but it's becoming rare to the point of looking like a lost art. The norm (UK, at least) always used to be that if the letter began "Dear Sir / Madam" it would end with "Yours faithfully", while a salutation of "Dear Mr. Smith" would give the valediction "Yours sincerely". ...


6

I've done this sort of thing as part of evaluating technologies. It's usually cast as an evaluation, covering both benefits and weaknesses, rather than just weaknesses. I suggest getting clarification on whether to address benefits too. The purpose of such a document is to help people make informed decisions about technologies or designs they don't fully ...


5

Pretend you are writing an email, and that the recipient will read it as plain text. "To put spacing between sections, hit 'enter' instead of using the space bar.... To highlight subheadings, use all caps. In lieu of bullet points, use "-" or "*" characters" (How to Format a Resume for Online Applications). (You can also use "+".) See if you can find an ...


5

Most résumés seem to solve this issue by creating bullet points and starting each bullet point with the verb.


4

"Persuasiveness" is highly subjective. I can't imagine how you would measure it other than to perform an experiment with real people. You didn't say what the subject of your paper is, which is probably good because that helps us to discuss the question of persuasiveness without being biased by whether or not we agree with you. I know of three basic ...


4

You can try to "rubber duck". Explain what you need to convey out loud to someone not in the know or even to a rubber ducky from the bathtub. Then write it down. When still unsure, wait a day and read it back to see if the text still makes sense. Keep at it, talk about it, it is a learn-able skill!


4

That would be the "author bio" Here are some links that may be of use: http://www.rachellegardner.com/2011/07/how-to-write-a-terrific-author-bio/ http://www.absolutewrite.com/freelance_writing/bio.htm


4

The problem you're having is in attaching the final clause: NAME is...that helps...by rating...and helps... . When the reader gets to the "and" he's expecting it to bind to the "by" -- NAME helps by doing two things, rating and...helping. But the next word is "helps", which doesn't fit that pattern. So the reader has to mentally backtrack and conclude ...


4

It depends upon the content of the letter. Just "Thanks," alone can sound off key if there is nothing obvious for which thanks to the reader is warranted, or too light-hearted when providing serious information. "Sincerely," is (to me) taking on an emotional component of a personal relationship to emphasize feelings. In professional communications no such ...


4

(My background is that as a software engineer, I have read and written many such notices). Data File or Download All caps is used in many licenses for emphasis, for example in the GPL, MIT License and BSD family of licenses (and probably many, many more, but those are the ones that come to mind, and I have checked them). Licenses are often written in nothing ...


3

In CMOS 16th edition, section 9.29 (Numbered divisions in legal instruments) comes (as best I can determine) to answering my question: "Arabic or roman numerals are sometimes used to distinguish divisions within legal instruments and other documents. ... A mixture of arabic and roman numerals sometimes distinguishes small from larger divisions." The ...


3

If it's a report generated by your company, you may as well put the logo on it. The only reason not to is if it's literally an internal memo, like an email or something, which isn't really being "distributed." If it's a report, with a title and organization and work which went into it, by all means brand it. It might lend the report a little gravitas, so ...


3

Writer's block is probably part of it, but another part is just knowing how to make ideas and words flow grammatically. I noticed you had a few minor mistakes in grammar, such as that you should have said, "when it comes to speaking in English," and "I consider myself to be at an intermediate level." (Although I would've said "I think I'm at an..." because ...


3

Short answer: If the font is easily readable, then it's fine. I wouldn't obsess over this. I'm sure psychologists and marketing people and psychics are convinced that choice of font has profound implications on the effect your material has on readers. Personally, I doubt it. Unless the font is unusual enough to stand out, unless readers see the font and ...


3

First, ask yourself if all the illustrations are necessary (i.e. are these screen captures illustrating a screen with one button on them?). The reader is going to be very annoyed having to flip back and forth between the procedure and the diagram. I don't have any links to show you for that, but I've done actual testing with users and the overwhelming ...


3

When you're looking for a job, you have (a) your skills, which is what you offer the company, and (b) your professional desires, which is what the company offers you. Examples: A graphic designer who (a) can work in print and on the web wants to (b) get more experience in creating responsive websites. A journalist who (a) has covered sports and local ...


3

If one of you is obviously senior to the other in some relevant way, then put that person’s name first. If you are both reasonably similar in standing, then put your names in alphabetical order.


3

You don't ever use apostrophes to form plurals, so that's right out. If the Roman numeral is part of the name, you would add an S: A total of 15 Saturn Vs were built, but only 13 were flown. If you have two people sharing a title, you pluralize the title (the Doctors Smith, the Ensigns Kim). But if the Roman numeral is fused to the title giving ...


3

Basically this goes in line with what I stated above, making the name one word is more than likely not an adequate enough of a change. See this link for more details. Transformative Use Another way to legally use Disney characters could be to use them in what the law refers to as "transformative use." Transformative use requires that you change, or ...


3

I always use, "Best" or "Best wishes". If someone's helped me a lot, I like to end with, "Thanks for everything".


3

Speaking as a former division manager of a public company that has hired dozens of programmers and engineers and read hundreds of resumes: Use "I". It is expected. Stick to the facts, do not engage in puffery, but do not be afraid to note very positive results; either (as you have). Do not be so stilted in your language. I would not use the word "utilize"...


3

I am not a lawyer, and you should consult a lawyer before you start naming your competitor's brands and products in any publication. It probably isn't worth it; especially if they are bigger than you and it doesn't cost them much (relative to their income) to be trigger-happy with the lawsuits. I'd also be careful what you SAY about the other product, any ...


3

Cite it exactly like you would a source for which you have a full name, except the name is "Anonymous." "XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX." (Anonymous, 2019) If it comes from a published work that has no author, you can use the name of the work in lieu of the author's name. Both APA and MLA use both of the above methods. Instead of "Anonymous" you can use "Unknown" ...


3

I would be fine with either a comma or a semi-colon, although I think I'd prefer the semi-colon. Lists, particularly with sentence fragments, are pretty flexible in terms of content and punctuation. Just be consistent.


3

To begin with, writing is a form of communication. The writer has something to say. The written word conveys that meaning. The reader processes the message by reading the words. All three elements, writer, words, and reader, must be in place for the communication to take place. I believe that the focus of "good" writing must be on the reader. The ...


3

Formal writing like legal documents, newspapers, research papers for publication, have their own style guides that define proper typesetting conventions. But, they are different. For example the AP Style Guide follows the usage outlined in your question. But the APA Style Guide uses the ampersand as part of citing a reference in the body of the text And ...


2

You should know that most people have trouble putting their ideas on paper – on the first try. The key to good writing is rewriting. It usually takes more than one attempt to get your writing polished. I imagine this is even more true in a second language, though I'm not fluent enough in any second language to try my hand at writing. It might be ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible