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2

I recently finished reading a novel in translation to English from Russian. The title was in Latin (in the original edition, the title was transliterated to Russian, but the English edition was in English transliteration.). In this case, the authors (a duo) used a Latin phrase because it had meaning within the book. None of the characters spoke Latin (or ...


1

There seems to be a consensus here. If you release it now when you know it is not ready, anyone who reads it will think this is the best you can offer. Should you publish another, the readers of the first will eschew your second knowing the quality of your writing. They might even post reviews - if it is anything like the first, save your money and time. ...


3

Don't try to chase trends. Everyone wants to be the next best thing. The perfectly timed topical hit. If that works out for you, great. But don't try to make it happen. Even if you finished your book next week, it's too late. The topic may have been around for months, but it will be gone by the time you get published. If not gone, then it will be ...


3

From experience, just hitting a pop-culture trend head-on isn't necessarily going to make people read your book. Keep in mind, when a trend is hitting, there's plenty of competition. The people who strike it big in those situations are the ones who were solidly ahead of the trend in the first place. So you may be overestimating this opportunity, even in ...


3

I agree with Arcanist Lupus on this. If you release an unedited novel, even if the trending subject does drive extra readers in your direction, a few one-star reviews on poor grammar, spelling, and sentence structure will soon drive the rest away. And those one-star reviews don't go away (unless you re-publish and start again). If the subject is still ...


9

Finish your book, make it the best you can, move on to the next 95% of the time, first novels are garbage. First drafts of first novels, even more so. Now, it's possible that you're an exception, and you have managed to produce something that is good enough to ride the crest of the trend to reasonable sales. As an anonymous internet person, I have no way ...


3

iBooks Author creates e-books in EPUB for the Apple Store. But AFAIK (I haven't used it) you can export your iBooks Author e-book as a PDF. POD (Print On Demand) companies like IngramSpark will take a PDF and convert it to print for you. However, most authors will use apps like Vellum, InDesign or PressBooks to create their e-book and then upload the ...


2

This discussion may convey that it's not possible through Apple. Then this article written in April 2018, by Rohi Shetty provides some insights: Read This Before Publishing Your First E-Book! : You can use KDP Print (Beta) or Createspace for creating and distributing print books. Publishing a paperback can help you reach new readers. KDP prints ...


2

Ditto Monica Cellio. Let me just add, registering the copyright before you submit it to a publisher would just be a waste of time and a headache. The publisher is almost certainly going to insist on doing some editing, making some changes. At which point the original copyright is no longer valid, as it's not the same content. So it would have to be ...


18

If you live in a country that is a signatory to the Berne Convention (most countries are), then your work is copyrighted as soon as you create it, regardless of whether you go through any registration process. To a publisher, your work is already copyrighted, and if they want the copyright and not just publication rights, they'll have to ask for that in the ...


3

Adapted from my contract: For the following projects: “Possession” (ongoing digital comic series + trade print collections) El Cadejo agrees that the COPYRIGHTS for the above named PROPERTY(including all images and manuscripts) shall be split 50/50 with [Collaborator]. Any rights to manufacture, sell, reproduce, distribute, transmit, broadcast, cable ...


6

Adapted from my answer to Can I self-publish a book on the Kindle store when I'm under 18? Absolutely, whenever you publish something with multiple authors—whether it's a collaboration or a work where a primary author(s) uses someone else's material—you want a written contract. My suggestion in your case is that one of you (probably you) is the primary ...


8

You have two choices: Write it up in the same style as the other quotes but don't give an attribution. It is common enough for writers to put something poetic or otherwise different from the main chapter text in the beginning of a chapter. Give a full citation, including the name of the work it came from. If it's unpublished, then it's just the author ...


4

Yes and no. I don't think many people purchase a book because of the cover. The cover will not give you direct sales (maybe a couple...). But imagine that you are looking for a book. Either knowing you want to buy something now or just browsing and seeing if something catches your eye. You're wandering through a bookstore where there are a couple ...


3

Is it really true that many ebook buyers are silly enough to purchase a book simply because of its cover (and blurb) without first sampling the actual writing inside the book? I wouldn't use the word "silly" here, personally, because people have to wade through a ton of available material. There is a hierarchy of what people will find interesting when ...


6

I'm not sure it's the ebook buyers who are the silly ones here. Of course people judge a book by its cover, as they should. To navigate the thousands or millions of books on a real or virtual shelf, a reader needs a guide. A good cover will convey genre and hint at the story inside. It sets an expectation for the reader that this story will fall inside the ...


0

Sounds like a kids book. You can self publish it you might want to have some pictures in it but no there have been worse things written remember the attack of the 50 foot chickens?


3

I'd say, for a short book, pitch it as a young children's book. Imaginative and silly are great for that. Get rid of your trademark issue with Fruit Loops, come up with some other name that doesn't infringe. e.g "Flavor Rings" or "RingaDings" or something (and Google whatever you come up with to ensure it isn't trademarked also). Edit your story to exclude ...


1

Nothing is too weird to be published. Truly, nothing. But plenty of works will not interest any of the publishers that currently exist. Even many works that are totally mainstream don't get published because nobody the author submitted to wants to publish them. Assuming you fix the problem of using a trademarked phrase (Fruit Loops), your silly story ...


2

There are some very odd writers with passionate fans, and sometimes critical acclaim or even fame and fortune. Daniel Pinkwater, Samuel Delany, Steven Hall, Francesca Block, Haruki Murakami, Lewis Carroll, Dav Pikey and Walter Moers are just a few of the very idiosyncratic writers who might make that list. But most of them are also extraordinarily good ...


2

As Cyn mentioned the publisher may have this information if they're still in business. Depending on the country the book was published in and how they maintain archives for written works, you may be able to track down information by the Books ISBN or other copyright information. My suggestion would be to start with the copyright information at the front ...


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