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1

Common mass market paperbacks are generally 250-300 words per page. Trade paperbacks typically run a similar count, due to larger type and wider margins. Hardbacks and trade paperbacks are printed from the same plates, most times, so word counts will be the same. That said, this is variable. Occasionally, a publisher will reduce type size by a point to ...


4

I put a paragraph break in your question as an edit, but it's still a huge block of text (now two huge blocks). Chapter dividers are a grander version of that. They give your reader a chance to catch her/his breath. Don't make it hard for them to take a break. A lot of people like to stop at the end of a chapter. Some books don't have any chapters at ...


5

I don't think it is too long, I write chapters nearly that long. Some readers (even my own) complain that they use chapters to gauge their progress through the story and as stopping points, and very long chapters mess them up on that. You don't have to break yours up, but in response to that I have broken a chapter somewhere in the 40% to 60% area, by ...


6

Endings are actually the biggest problem that discovery writers face. Plotters usually have the most trouble in the middle; discovery writers tend to progress fluidly through the middle (because characters are just being who they are), but that creates many complications and they have trouble in bringing all the arcs to a close simultaneously. I am a ...


1

Often if something is included as an illustration (in a non-children's book) it might be A Clue! Agatha Christie novels are known for this -- if there's a diagram, that means understanding the locations of things is important. So if you included a full reproduction of the brochure, I'd be wondering if there's a secret within --does it indicate ...


14

Typically, in a prose novel, you would describe the brochure, not reproduce it. After patiently listening to my story, she pulled out a resort brochure titled Transformation Intensive Programme, and pointing out with the pen in her hand she said; “Here, this one looks like something interesting for you." It cost £1500! It would be possible to ...


0

Everything you put into a book that is not your original work must be done with permission. This refers to both artwork and text. Items in the public domain have blanket permission for others to use. That's what being public domain means. Sometimes a creator will put a work into Creative Commons or another program. In this case there will be very clear ...


3

You would need written permission from the copyright holder, and would generally need to pay for it, unless you can establish "fair use." I am not a lawyer, so I can't give legal advice, but fair use generally involves uses of low-fidelity or excerpted reproductions, used strictly for reference purposes, and that cannot be held to compete with the ...


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