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43

I might be able to help; I spent my whole young life moving from project to project without finishing anything. Now I am a casually famous horror author whose work is unusually popular on YouTube, and my second book was optioned for a film. 1. Keep a notebook with you I keep a large, college-ruled notebook in my backpack with me at all times. That backpack ...


21

One at a time. It isn't laziness. That's just a word people throw out when work doesn't get done and in many cases, including yours, it's meaningless. You've done a lot of work, you're just not finishing it. Set up a source of external pressure. I had a novel in my head for 10 years before I did anything about it. I did some research and wrote an ...


20

CSS supports media queries since Level 2, Revision 1. That's from way back in 2011, so any modern web browser should support it. If you're able to specify custom CSS, and apply custom CSS classes to your content, then you can define a CSS class such that the pictures and other ancilliary content is shown on screen, but only the actual recipe is printed on ...


13

Pro's: It gives you feedback. Any feedback can help you to improve your work, if you are able to filter it properly. It gives you exposure and generates hype for your work. It allows you to build an audience even before your work is finished. It prevents you from procrastinating. If you don't write anything for weeks, there will be a public record of your ...


13

Each sentence must be exactly as long as it need be; never longer. Sentences establish the rhythm of your writing. Sentence construction -- length, rhythm, variation, and rhyme -- are the tools that align writing and oratorical style. A blog post is a short experience. You tease ideas. You dip a reader's mind into your logic and hope to bring them back ...


12

The rules are changing, which makes it a bit hard to be sure what the hell the rules currently are. Posting on your blog counts as publication. The traditional rule was definitely that, for fiction at least, most publishers want first publication rights, and you'd be blowing those rights by posting on your blog. Is that still the rule? I think it is, for ...


12

I have resorted more than once to citing Neil Gaiman's 2012 address Make Good Art. Let me quote from it here too: The moment that you feel that, just possibly, you're walking down the street naked, exposing too much of your heart and your mind and what exists on the inside, showing too much of yourself. That's the moment you may be starting to get it ...


12

The Aim! What is your aim when you write? To please readers To teach morals to readers To improve your writing skills It's just a hobby If you can answer this question, it is pretty self-explaining. Personally, I think a post should convey a message to readers like typical moral telling stories. Readers should feel and get the message at the end of the ...


11

You can try to add a "what I learned" sentence to the end of your blog posts, when there is something interesting to say, if your aim is to give "morals" to the readers. But overall, no: you don't need to convey a moral. Clearly stated morals are actually fine for a small subset of written media (e.g. fables or religious parables). In both cases the ...


11

It depends on your intended audience. If your audience is literature professors, then you can use pretty long and complex sentences, as long as you make sure that they are reasonably well-written. Indeed, those professors probably will get quite annoyed if all your sentences are too short and simple. You write for high school dropouts? Prefer short and ...


11

TL;DR: Put the important stuff atop. This isn't the technical solution you were looking for, but it's another way to give both types of readers what they want. Readers who want the full story will read your blog post regardless of where you place the actual recipe. So why not place it right atop, maybe prefaced with a "TL;DR" (too long; didn't read)? Busy ...


10

If you have supporters following your blog, you might be able to argue that you have an audience who will buy your writing. However, to be meaningful to an agent and therefore a publisher, your audience has to be in the thousands at the least, and even better, have already paid for some of your stuff. So if you can sell 10K copies of a self-published e-...


10

Nobody can tell whether people will be willing to read your blog There is no way to tell. First of all they have to like Blogs. Not everybody likes the style, some people prefer reading mostly books, some prefer mostly newspaper, some prefer magazines, some prefer blogs, ... Therefore the first thing to realize is that your target audience is limited to ...


9

Writing a lot is good for writers. The more you write the better writer you become. No matter what you write. If you write blogs, that's just fine. Still, there are problems no amount of writing will help - just opposite, it will make them rooted harder. If you keep making a certain mistake, lots of writing won't help against it. Lots of reading may help. ...


9

Hi Prasad_Joshi and welcome! You have a lot of good (technical and detailed) answers here so I won't add too much. All I'll say is be careful of being too prescriptive with your writing. Repeated short sentences can sound staccato. Sentences that are laboriously long can lose the reader's attention and become difficult to untangle. Repeated sentences ...


9

What is the main topic? As algorithms change, one of the best things to do is consistently "write like a human." Just talk about Your Topic, and do it frequently. More words = more chances for the Right Words to ping. Since I'm doing a podcast, for the one where I'm fully scripting it, I'm including that script/transcript as a chance for Google and other ...


8

I think the main problem is that your article, and the stylistic choices you make to write it, are all setup and no payoff. The first half, which actually is setup and is where you frame the problem, isn't too bad. A neat historical anecdote, a build up that walks the reader though, and deeper, into the problem, topped off with a suspense-building capper - "...


8

WordPress is software, which can be self-hosted (run on your own computers/dedicated servers). The .org website lets you download the software and run it for yourself. This route is for the more technically literate, who know what they're doing. On the other hand, the .com version is where the company hosts blogs for other people instead (at some costs).


8

No, you don't need to convey a moral. And probably shouldn't. Many blog posts are just informative and explanatory about what is going on in the world, from your point of view. The scope can be global (like global politics, or climate change effects, etc) down to private life; say you want to describe the cute kids next door playing pirates in the yard. ...


8

I imagine the issue is psychological, but not necessarily fear of public opinion. I would pick an endpoint for the post; just basically what you think you want to conclude. The result. The point you wanted to make; even if the "point" is "I had a great time at this party." Use that as a "compass" while you write the post. Meaning, what you write is to let ...


7

Downsides: It's unprofessional. They are usually teenager level style. Most of them are repeated ad nauseam. Reposting an old meme is boooring. Trying to fit them in for the sake of having them in is a really pathetic attempt at being hip. Upsides: It can liven up a text. It can be really memorable and funny if done right. It can really drive a point home....


7

The contributors own the copyright to the content unless they assign it to you in some form. Submission may or may not constitute permission for you to use the content. It certainly does not assign you exclusive copyright to the content. To prevent the contributors from claiming their contents, ask them to assign you exclusive rights for whatever duration ...


7

1) Leave comments: There are many film review blogs. Comment under their reviews. Like: "Interestingly, we have really different view on quality of the movie. some detail from your review" Btw, The comments should be on topic, interesting and not bragging ones. Everyone hates "hey, visit my awesome blog!" comment 2) Do giveaways and promos Do you have ...


7

Thank gods, ideas are not copyrightable at all (in any country, as far as I know; particularly in the US under Section 102 of the Copyright Act, in Russia under Section 1259 of Civil Code, etc).


7

180 is the average number of words per minute a human reads. Take the number of words and divide it by 180. Here you go. The average human should take 1 minute to read 180 words. Some platforms may use different numbers, and platforms that track your actual reading pace (e.g. a Kindle device or app) might adjust themselves to your own average speed -- ...


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