9

The self-insert doesn't have to be bad. It's just that most of the time when we see one, it's this perfect person with no flaws and perfect judgment. You of ten years ago might make the perfect choice with your ex, given another chance. But it's equally (or more) likely you would just do something else dumb. If your character is still flawed, it's probably ...


7

Writing biographies like these for a mass audience will require that the reader understand the subject's work. This can be handled by long expository passages, or, as is more frequently done, concepts can be broken up into small, easily digestible pieces. These can alternate with the story of the subject's life, information provided to the reader only as is ...


7

Unless you are near (what you think is) the end of your life, you don't have enough data yet to know what will ultimately be the best organization. So don't try to create an outline; just start writing pieces. Chronological seems logical but might not be very engaging. Is reading a day-by-day (or week-by-week) diary where not a lot happens at once ...


6

If you want to describe one important event in one book, then that's not an autobiography; it's a memoir. There's absolutely nothing wrong with that, and you can certainly include information about your life aside from that event in the book. An autobiography would be the entire story of your life to date, and you would generally go into less detail on each ...


5

My advice is to find some element (with an emotional content) that changed across your life and make a list. The goal is to have an outline of major events. Then fill the gaps between those "milestones". For me, a list of girlfriends worked pretty well (without it turning out to be a book about my sex life). Anything could be suitable for this purpose (like ...


5

I have an additional possibility to consider: Get yourself better known. Submit some of the episodes of your story to widely circulated magazines, especially magazines that serve the audience you want to reach. Contact writers and reporters for national and local media outlets (magazines, newspapers, TV, websites) to see if they're interested in your story. ...


4

I'm sorry about your father. I can tell that you're very devoted to him even now. He would probably be honored to know this. I'm a student journalist; I interview a lot of people. I always walk in with a mental list of questions, so you're already on the right track! Let me help you break down an interview: Icebreaker questions. Simple questions like "How ...


4

My personal opinion is to try sell it to an agent as an Autobiography first - but make the back cover matter interesting - so that someone who picks it up and reads the cover - even though they don't know you, suddenly wants to buy the book to find out more. If you fail to get an agent after a few months of trying - turn it into a novel and try that. I ...


4

In order to make scientific work accessible to the non-scientist, you need to connect it to something within the experience of your audience. The personal life of the researcher is a very popular vehicle for this but not the only one available. Look to the events of the world in which he worked to provide the thread that might otherwise come from his ...


4

Your problem appears to be twofold. By writing in this way you are projecting onto this character: Your personality, and Your background Your character is limited by the decisions YOU would make in the same situation and your story is limited by all YOUR grievances and regrets and "what ifs". Both of these issues can be solved at once: get better at ...


4

That is probably up to an editor or publisher. If by "short" you mean a few paragraphs that won't cost them printing any extra pages, it is possible they will not object. But they are profit driven and this biography does not serve the story or earn them anything, so if it is also going to cost them money, they may refuse to include it.


4

It sounds like you want to introduce your readers to one of your inspirations (since you said this person is connected to one of the characters in your book). This is sometimes done in a preface, as opposed to in the backmatter, and can help "set the stage" for the work that follows. An author's preface of a page or two is fairly common, though of course ...


4

It's called a memoir. Memoir is a subset of autobiography, which is a subset of biography. A biography is the story of someone's life. Autobiography is when you write your own biography. Memoir is writing about your own life but without the scope of a biography. Your book may span many decades, but it's short and focused on certain events. Since your ...


3

You might benefit from clarifying the difference between an autobiography and a memoir. There are many articles on these topics on the Internet. They might help you find an answer. Autobiographies tend to be chronological; memoirs focus on a theme, topic or event. What makes any story standout is getting the voice right: if you create an engaging persona as ...


3

Many famous authors have made their names on lightly fictionalized versions of their own lives. This is called autobiographical fiction, and it underlies books from To Kill a Mockingbird and David Copperfield to Fear of Flying and Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance. Consider also the movie, Almost Famous, with a similar theme as your own work. It's ...


3

If the audience you are writing to knows what those acronyms are, then go ahead and use them. So for technical documents, resumes, etc, the audience knows what BS, MS, PhD stand for. Personally, I didn't know the technical or certifications acronyms, but if the document you are writing is very technical and meant for technical people you can get away ...


3

If the moments of that events are jumbled and chaotic, then write it down that way. crashing sounds oh my god what just is that smoke? people running my heartrate starts to spike the ground is thrumming my legs are jelly I need to get out of here push you idiot get out of my way that is smoke what's burning need to run I need to run You can remember ...


3

Use your imagination. I mean, your imagination should be informed by experiences you've actually had and remembered, but you expand and explore and combine these experiences using your imagination, not your memories. By 'imagination' I don't mean wild flights of fancy. Don't throw a unicorn into a car crash scene just because your imagination takes you ...


3

I don't have the exact term for the style, but the one autobiography that I still think about (even though I am not a writer) is Stephen King's 'On Writing'. He started with his childhood and the further you've read, more of each page became about the art of writing and less about what other bios I read contain - unabashed chivalry, heroic deeds, monumental ...


3

If it were me I would just start writing without any sort of outline or rules. I would write whatever I felt at the moment and as little or as much as I was moved to write. Once you have a lot written it will be obvious to you how it should be organized in the book. As with any large project that is overwhelming at first I get nowhere until I just start ...


3

It sounds like you want to write a memoir of your father. The advantage of writing a memoir is that there is no expectation of academic research or factual accuracy; it is a compilation of personal memories and anecdotes. If your father, family, and friends are still around, it's a great idea to tell them about your project. Invite them to sit around an ...


2

I am not a lawyer. But ... I don't know how police and courts treat an autobiography. I've never heard of someone being convicted of a crime because he confessed to it in an autobiography. But a very common method for police to catch a criminal is that he tells someone else about the crime and that person reports it to the police. Many criminals seem to get ...


2

Well, chronological is always a useful way of telling this sort of story, but it might not be the most engaging. As strange as it sounds, even a biography has to have a story. Sometimes the best way to do this is start it at a singular event, then go back to see how you came to that point. The idea is to show how your life molded you into the person that you ...


2

As mentioned in comments this question has been addressed before but as a fellow writer I cannot resist talking about my own experiences. I tell a lot of stories that involve my friends and family. I also (when the daylight allows) run a writer's group. An exercise I give the group is to write a description of several people in the group without using their ...


2

Under the laws of the UK and countries whose legal system is derived from English Common Law, which includes the United States, the dead cannot be libelled. So in those countries using this man as a character will not get you into legal trouble, whatever you say about him. I do not know about the laws in non-Anglosphere countries. (I assume that by "get ...


2

An autobiography will generally tell your whole life up till now, you wouldn't write a whole book for a single event. Furthermore, you'll want to include more than just three events if you're going to draw people into the story of your life and see how you develop as a person. Is there a compelling reason why people would want to read your autobiography? ...


2

It sounds like your father was a public person. In that case, you have to ask yourself what you're really prepared to find out about him. If all you want is to get boilerplate encomiums, then it doesn't matter much what you ask beyond "What was he like? What did you like about him? What were his strengths?" If you want a picture of the whole man, warts and ...


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