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1

It's an entirely Western thing to not have illustrations in novels. The general consensus I found in other boards is that, "Illustrations lack maturity, thus they are only in children's to YA books." The other drawback is the cost of hiring an artist and having them draw stuff. The artistic reason is that a "good" author should be able to paint the picture ...


5

No, that would be dishonest. If you say "I am an illustrator", that means that you draw illustrations. The fact that I bought a piece of beef at the grocery store does not make me a cattle rancher. I own the beef, but I didn't raise the cow. You can say, "I wrote this book and I also own the copyright on the illustrations" or something to that effect. If ...


2

Aside from children books, there's an entire novel industry whose one of the main appeals is the inclusion of illustrations: the light novel industry in Japan. In the good old days, pulp magazines were a cheap way to consume literature. These magazines usually included many short stories within a single issue, with popular characters (such as Doc Savage and ...


3

Since you do already own these illustrations, you can use them as a self-publisher, or, in the case that a traditional publisher does want both, you should be entitled to all the royalties without splitting them. However, the original illustrator should still be credited. It's at-the-least unethical to claim their work as yours, even if you have legal ...


2

Not a lawyer. You paid an illustrator to provide artwork for your book. You (supposedly) own the right to publish the artwork - that's what you paid the artist for. But that doesn't make you the illustrator of the work. You are not an author/illustrator. You are an author. The illustrator would need to be credited as such. The book would be "written by X, ...


0

Adult novels were often illustrated in the 19th century, perhaps because they had often been serialised in a magazine first. Thackeray famously drew his own illustrations for 'Vanity Fair', showing the female characters in the costume of his own time (crinolines) because he thought Regency ladies' fashions were so ugly!


4

Many good points here. I won't repeat what others have said. Let me just add ... Color illustrations are particularly a problem. Printing a color page is more expensive than printing a black & white page. So if there are color pictures in the book, do we print the whole book in "color", when in fact for 90% of the pages the only colors are black and ...


0

If you're one of the lucky few with talents both in text and image, enjoy it and be sure to take advantage of it. But you should recognize some things: First, in the online world we frequently rely on photographs and stock images to illustrate our point. That might work in the ebook world, but you have spend extra time and money to obtain/clear the rights. ...


8

Illustrations tend to be pretty popular in fantasy and (to a lesser degree) sci-fi books - authors often include maps to give people an idea about the geography of the worlds they've created. However, I'm generally not a fan of such things. There's a few reasons for this: 1) The illustration quality is often poor - paperback books especially are rarely ...


10

In general, @Galastel is correct; the problem is the costs. That said, the first Harry Potter Book by J.K. Rowling contains "illustrations", my copy of "Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone" contains graphical signatures, symbols or handwriting on 9 pages. These are all black and white only; and typically no more than a quarter page tall. In at least one ...


1

Illustrations do not add much to a novel. If anything, it often detracts from it. Part of the joy of reading (for many) is to imagine what the people and the places look like. Having illustrations takes that from the readers. On top of that, the illustrator and the author are rarely the same person. And since no 2 people share the same vision (on ...


20

Books for young children --including novels --are almost always illustrated, and the younger the audience age, the more elaborate and central the illustrations. Middle grade novels frequently have at-least spot illustrations --and novel/graphic-novel hybrids like the Wimpy Kid series are not uncommon. Even young adult novels often have at least some ...


31

There are exceptions to the "no illustrations" trend. For example, Susanna Clarke's Jonathan Strange & Mr. Norrel is filled with black-and-white illustrations reminiscent of the wood engravings that would have accompanied 19th-century books. This is in line with the novel's general style, a tribute to 19th century literature. However, in general, you ...


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