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11

That depends on where the two separate statements come from. If Smith says the price decreases, while Watson says the industry grows, the first one is correct. On the other hand, if both authors note the correlation of price and industry, the second is right. It happens very often that the same statement is contained in more than one article, so you need to ...


11

If you are simply referring to the character, no, don't put his name in quotes or any other special typography. Like: Just as the Wizard of Oz was great and powerful, so, etc. This is true of any fictional character. My friend Bob is a lot like Captain Kirk, etc. If you are quoting an actual statement from the books, then you should put it in quotes. ...


6

In a comment under your question, you said that you mostly follow APA style. This is what the Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association (6th ed.) says: 4.13 Hyphenation en dash: An en dash is longer and thinner than a hyphen yet shorter than an em dash and is used between words of equal weight in a compound adjective (e.g., ...


4

I am almost entirely certain that no such thing exists as an actual credential from the APA directly. However, I would imagine that some programs, maybe at the community college level or other certifying bodies, may offer a certificate as an APA-style editor (or any other style). I have a four-year degree in writing and rhetoric, and the track I was in was ...


4

Chapters 6 and 7 of Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association, Sixth Edition covers citations and referencing in the APA format. As @Robin pointed out, EasyBib gives a rundown of how you reference a digitised book (an e-book) at http://www.easybib.com/guides/citation-guides/apa-format/e-book. Structure: Author, F.M. (Year of ...


4

You may use some classical Latin abbreviations, like "ibid." or "op.cit" which are precisely used to indicate that the last quotation has the same source as the previous one.


4

If there's no source for the quote, it's very likely misattributed. A lot of quotes get falsely attributed to Einstein, probably to give them a little more weight. Proper citation means that you don't propagate this false information, and in fact, do your best to set the record straight. The earliest references on Google books are from around 1945 and ...


3

Why would citing "a well-known historical source" be any different from citing a not-particularly-well-known historical source? For the speech: you found the speech somewhere, right? Book, website, magazine? Cite that source. For the U.S. Constitution, a quick Google of "rules for citing US constitution in bibliography" turns up this link from the APA ...


3

Note that these are discussions about style, not something like grammar; as such, there is no "correct" or "incorrect" way among the different choices. The best thing is to pick one style and stick to it. And, APA and MLA are just two out of dozens of commonly used styles of citation. When considering which style to follow, you should also consider the ...


3

Generally the rule of thumb with web pages is to treat the title of the page or the domain as the title of the inline citation, so if the page title is 'Google Public Data', go with that. In practice I think that 'Google' is a little too general, because of the number of products Google provide. You would also need to provide the url in your full citation. ...


3

You are correct! However, this was not always the case. Here's some background: The fifth edition of the APA publication manual required the use of numerals when numbers below 10 were grouped for comparison with numbers 10 and above in the same paragraph. For example: "I saw 10 small dogs and 9 large dogs at the park today." (As you know, in other ...


3

The term for same source is ibidem, abbreviated to ibid. (include the dot).


3

The method by which you cite something will change based on the style guide you use, but the need to provide a citation remains the same. (This is true of APA and anything else.) Regardless, each quotation does need to have a citation provided—even if it's the same source previously used. However, you can use ellipses within a quotation to indicate elided ...


2

I agree with getting a copy of the APA publication manual, sixth edition either digital or hardcopy. I have both and use them all the time. The APA also has a website for reference based on the book. But, I also highly recommend using the Purdue OWL (online writing lab) APA style section. It is great for quick reference because it is searchable and is based ...


2

When I taught ENGL100, I advised students to minimize quotes (still maximize citations for their summaries and paraphrases unless it was to indicate "poetry or precision". The quote you indicated definitely would count under "poetry" -- any attempt to rephrase it changes its meaning too significantly. If there is a firm rule in the class against ...


2

Given your quote in context, the obscenity works. It's blunt and to the point, and since you are in fact pointing out that people don't have time or energy for philosophy when they're starving, it's rather apropos. If you're genuinely worried about the expletive, don't use a halfway substitute. Make it clear what you're censoring by using the correct term, ...


2

APA Style does not allow for additional information within citations. That is properly the function of footnotes or content notes and APA Style does provide for these. See The Purdue Owl website for more details. This site has been my go-to for APA formatting for several years now. Note: According to the Purdue Owl website linked above, APA Style has ...


2

If you are using a heading, feel free to start it on a new page. Try to imagine headings as being similar to chapter markers, they mark the start of a new section of your piece, however, this is again dependent on your writing style and any criteria your examiners require.


2

The citation relates to the words immediately before it, I would say. The format for cittions - Name, date - is a good one for many reades.


2

APA Style follows Bluebook (legal) style for legal citation (see the APA Blog). Per the The Bluebook: A Uniform System of Citation R. 10.8.3, at 113 (Columbia law Review Ass'n et al. eds., 20th ed. 2015), you should be including the name of the document (e.g. "Brief for the Petitioner" or "Brief for The Copyright Alliance") in addition to the name of the ...


2

In your case, you have a single book authored by two people with the same surname but different initials. Your in-text citation would look like this: As P. Ehrlich and Ehrlich underlined,  . . . (2015) And your reference list entry would look like this: Ehrlich, P., & Ehrlich, A. . . . The explanation for this follows. The Publication Manual of the ...


2

First of all, APA only uses author and date for its in-text citations. It generally doesn't matter what other information you know about the source; it only uses those two pieces of information in the main text itself. The only complexities around this occur when there are multiple authors, the author or the date is unknown, it's coming from a secondary ...


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