7

American and British English differ here. In American English, the convention is to put the punctuation inside the quotes. He proclaimed that "he sleeps with the fishes." In British English, the convention is to put the punctuation outside the quotes unless it is part of the quote. He proclaimed that "he sleeps with the fishes". Though note that in ...


4

There are websites out there that can be set to format citations for every single form of media. Citing just the televised report, you'll need as much of the following information: The Reporter's name (the one in the field, not the anchor unless the anchor is telling the story quickly), the date of original air, the time to the most recent top or bottom of ...


3

All your examples are good, except #3. A gangster might channel The Godfather movies by proclaiming "he sleeps with the fishes." Of course we all know what this means. Periods and commas go inside the quotation mark, whether the punctuation is part of the quoted text or not. (In American English.)


2

If you're referring to APA style and you want to cite a quote you're using, then you don't use numbered lists, instead you use authors and page numbers to reference the specific quote. If you want to reference specific content, without a quote, that adds to the material you've described, then I'd say that the footnote ID, 1, would follow your text. APA ...


2

I see no reason why you'd treat the punctuation/quote convention any differently for a single letter than for a paragraph. The interaction of punctuation and quote has to do with white space and clarity of content, not the volume of what comes before those two characters.


1

Ultimately this relies on the definition of tabular matter (or rather table). And I’d say the definition is pretty simple: tables have rows and columns (and content is therefore arranged in a grid). What you have does not have columns so it’s not a table. (Also a table would probably abstract out the word “topics” and put it in the table head.) If it ...


1

The rule I was taught in school was to spell out numbers that are less than or equal to 20, with various exceptions. But this is a matter of style. Different organizations have different style guides. If your company has a style guide, follow it. If not and they have an editor who has his own idea of proper style, then unless he's blatantly wrong or his ...


1

While that's fine, I wouldn't require online citations. Hszmv's description is how I would go. Don't forget the channel. A number and city if it is local, the company if it is not local. Examples: ABC7 News, KGO Bay Area and San Francisco BBC World News America CCN International Include the date and time (and time zone if relevant), the name of the ...


1

I don't believe this is specifically covered by AP style. My personal approach would be to present the code in a block quote. (Or, if it's something really short, just a different font face.) But you're not going to find a "rule" that everybody follows for this situation. It's really up to the individual publisher.


1

I would say you have to attribute the quotes, even if you don't have to cite them flat out. So your first mention would be something like: This scene was in fact shot in Seville, Spain rather than Morocco (Fire and Lunch, 7/15/06). And then subsequent mentions: Young Ned's rush into the Tower of Joy is halted by Bran's time-traveled shout. If Bran ...


1

I have the 2011 edition of the AP Stylebook, which gives the following as correct examples: He promised this: The company will make good all the losses. There were three considerations: expense, time, and feasibility. Yours seems to fit the first example, so as an independent clause it would take a capital letter after the colon. I would use both commas ...


1

OK, I finally seem to have found a concrete mandate on this issue after digging a little deeper. Not sure if I should reference my source as a valid one since it's definitely not official but I'll let the readers be the judge. Here's the link: Quotation Marks: Where Do the Commas and Periods Go--and Why? To quote the article, universal American usage places ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible