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The former is more common - Passivation and Introduction. It is conventional in scientific writing to be as removed as possible from the suggestion of human interference. Hence the use of the third person rather than the first in papers. The use of the noun form reads more naturally in this format. A gerund like passivating implies a deliberate action ...


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Usually - this is how it's done at my university - you write a definition of a term before applying it in a context. In that manner you make sure that the reader understands your view of the terminology and you can show that the definition has been scientifically researched and compared to its various interpretations. "Rap is commonly known as... Mayer (...


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Could anyone one tell me which way is correct for academic writing? I don't believe there's an official "correct" way: it's best to just choose a "publication name" and stick to it. A random Chinese name from RenRen is 高继山 (Gao Jishan). Here the surname is Gao (高) and the given name is Jishan (继山). Possible publication names are: Jishan Gao Ji-shan Gao ...


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Chinese names are generally written like this "surname/family name + given name" ,for example: Yang Ming But when you deal with English Names of Chinese people it's written like this, "Given Name + Surname/Family Name" , for example: Andrew Yang


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The only rule I have seen is do not make "List of One Thing" where your list (and sub-list) only have one componant. If you have Item A.1 then you must have an A.2.


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In academic writing, lists should appear at the end of the document, just before any appendices. In fiction, a single list of characters might appear after the table of contents and before the first chapter. Additional lists appear at the end of the tale or volume. Hope this helps.


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