Podcast #128: We chat with Kent C Dodds about why he loves React and discuss what life was like in the dark days before Git. Listen now.

New answers tagged

2

"willst" isn't a real word. Don't use it. "wilt" is an archaic word, used in second person singular. E.g. "I will", "Thou wilt", "He willeth". "hath means has and hast means have" isn't quite right. Again, they are archaic singular conjugations: "I have", "Though hast", "He hath".


0

"They don't have any concept of what the consequences of recommending this content" This makes no sense to me. "They don't have any concept of what the consequences might be of recommending this content" This is a lot of words to make a simple statement. "They have no concept of the consequences of recommending this content." This seems better.


0

I would have thought that the lack of knowledge is the main point, and thus, should be the last thought of the sentence. I would suggest, "They are recommending this content, but they have no idea of the consequences." or "They are recommending this content; They have no idea of the consequences." Perhaps too punchy for academic writing but conveys the your ...


0

'They don't have any concept of what the consequences of recommending this content' - this not incomplete? °They have no concept (idea rather) of the consequences of such a recommendation.° Concept in this context is a bit too strong, even as a synonym. Rather stick to 'idea' but if you feel it fits well then stick with it. Remove unnecessary words that ...


1

Within the figure description itself, just use (i), (ii), (iii), etc.or (A), (B), (C), (D) to save space. In the text of your paper, refer to Figure 2(i), Figure 2(ii), or Figure 2(A), Figure 2(B). As in (for figure description): Figure 2: (A) reflex, (B) recoil As in (for body text): In Figure 2(A) we see the reflex action of the potential, while ...


0

Using the simple expression: Figure 2(i) shows cycle C is succinct and conveys the required meaning. It is usually preferable to keep such references short and you will see many such examples in the literature. The extraneous words used in your other suggestions add nothing to your intentions.


1

I heard once that a person has to come across a word seven times before they feel confident enough to use it for themselves. I would recommend the following ways to practice English in order to expand your vocabulary: Read for pleasure Whatever books you like to read normally, read those in English, whether it's Harry Potter or the Handmaid's Tale. ...


3

TL;DR: It's acceptable, but I would get a second opinion. I've never heard of anyone using the phrase "their very self", but I have seen "very existence", "very soul", etc. It's simply a tool for emphasis, so using it to emphasize an important point in any writing (academic or creative) doesn't seem out of place to me. However, I don't spend much of my ...


0

Text Compression Compression of text is a lot like refactoring code. A lot of people here code, so maybe they'll appreciate this concept Abstraction A complex idea can often be represented by a single word. When you have a lot of words, see if there's a more concise, well-understood, word or phrase that could replace everything else. Fuzzy Compression/...


1

In the ordinary text following the table I wrote "Multilateral Development Banks (MDBs)", but should I put a footnote also in the table? You could but I don't think it is necessary and I would not; I don't expect a reader to look at the table until they read the discussion about it. I would put the expansion somewhere in that discussion (and it sounds like ...


1

I assume you're using latex with autogenerated glossary, if not you probably should. \usepackage[acronym]{glossaries} \makeglossaries \newacronym{MDBs}{MDBs}{Multilateral Development Banks} If this is some acronym you will use more later, it's better to introduce it in the main text before it shows up in a table: In this part of research we used \gls{...


Top 50 recent answers are included