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Documentation, tutorials, training, user guides, installation guides, design documents, and all other types of technical documentation in any domain (not just software).

16
votes
7answers
When writing about technical topics it is often difficult to get across the complexity of a topic without getting "stuck in the weeds" and ultimately leaving the audience confused or disinterested. Pa …
asked Jan 23 '18 by thesquaregroot
2
votes
This is tough. I tend to have what a view that I think is fairly close to yours and I think it's often difficult to argue for more accuracy without coming across as pedantic. I think that are a coup …
answered Feb 14 '18 by thesquaregroot
7
votes
The tactic I use most often for this is analogy. By creating an analogy to a commonly understood topic, you can introduce the core ideas in a way that feels familiar to the audience. That said, comi …
answered Jan 23 '18 by thesquaregroot
7
votes
In my experience, no matter what you do you will end up with variances and idiosyncrasies throughout your documentation. People have different expectations for what level of formality, what level of …
answered Jan 24 '18 by thesquaregroot
1
vote
The way that I've done this in the past, at least in web-based documentation and Word documents, is to start with a less technical overview touching on the key points (high-level purpose, context, usa …
answered Jan 26 '18 by thesquaregroot