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Results tagged with Search options user 272

This tag should be used for questions that deal with a consistent style in your writing, such as when asking about typical ways to introduce a certain aspect to your reader by showing-telling or if you are concerned that your readers might feel that a change in the point of view might be perceived as inconcsistency.

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The rules for italicizing the titles of works (such as newspapers, books, albums, journals) are the same inside quotation marks and outside.
answered Sep 23 '17 by Dale Hartley Emery
2
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idea works for paragraphs, sections, chapters, and entire essays. Connect, and take a small step. Connect again, and take another step. I learned this principle from Joseph M. Williams's enormously helpful book Style. The subtitle is "Lessons in Clarity and Grace." I recommend it highly. …
answered Dec 24 '11 by Dale Hartley Emery
9
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A great way to discover your style is to force yourself to exhibit it. And a great way to force yourself to exhibit your style is to write with one habit tied behind your back. Or tied up and locked … punctuation work. And you learn how to choose those things deliberately, instead of out of habit. And by choosing deliberately, you discover your style. …
answered Apr 12 '12 by Dale Hartley Emery
6
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Peter Elbow, in his book Being a Writer, recommends something like: "First make a mess. Then clean up the mess." Your way seems to fit that nicely. Trust your process.
answered Dec 4 '10 by Dale Hartley Emery
0
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I find that mindmaps are terrific for that. As you read the passage, sketch a mindmap of your thoughts and observations about style, meaning, the general thesis, noting any connections you notice …
answered Jun 5 '11 by Dale Hartley Emery
6
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For this specific case, I don't see a reason to set it off. In fact, I would likely find emphasis-by-formatting distracting. Here's why I don't think you need to do anything special: You've already …
answered Aug 5 '15 by Dale Hartley Emery
3
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I've been applying Dean Wesley Smith's challenge to use "all five senses every two pages." Using all five senses helps remind me to include sensory details, and many of these are about setting. I'm fi …
answered Apr 16 '13 by Dale Hartley Emery
6
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If you don't describe a character the moment they first appear, the reader will form an image. If you're happy to let readers form whatever image they want, don't describe the character, ever. Many s …
answered Aug 6 '15 by Dale Hartley Emery
1
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easier to read my sentences. Emphasis. In his brilliant book Style, Joseph M. Williams says that the end of a sentence is the stress position. Readers tend to give more emphasis to the information they …
answered Mar 25 '15 by Dale Hartley Emery
2
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Here are some reasonably objective features that tend to make a passage feel more stilted: Abstract or inanimate subjects. That is, subjects that are non-human, non-animal, or otherwise unable to ta …
answered May 8 '15 by Dale Hartley Emery
8
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There are two elements of a quote for which clarity is far more important than friendliness: The description of your services. The statement of your fees. If you like, make everything else in your …
answered Feb 20 '12 by Dale Hartley Emery
4
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I highly recommend Williams and Colomb's Style. Throughout the book they focus heavily on three ideas: What do readers expect? What choices can writers make? How do the writer's choices affect the … reader's expectations? For example, where other books might admonish not to use passive voice, Style describes the effects of passive voice, and through examples demonstrates where you might want …
answered Feb 8 '11 by Dale Hartley Emery
4
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Such "metadiscourse" can help guide the reader through a complex line of reasoning. "Use these phrases liberally" seems like coarse advice, perhaps useful until students can distinguish for themselve …
answered Sep 22 '13 by Dale Hartley Emery
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Grammar "violations" are perfectly fine in fiction, as long as they create the effect you desire in the reader. Incomplete sentences can (sometimes) pick up the pace, or make the reading choppy and s …
answered Jun 14 '13 by Dale Hartley Emery
3
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Here's how I think about all writing rules that tell me what I should or should not do: What is the effect of doing this? How does it affect the reader? When would I want those effects? When would I n …
answered Dec 4 '10 by Dale Hartley Emery

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