Search type Search syntax
Tags [tag]
Exact "words here"
Author user:1234
user:me (yours)
Score score:3 (3+)
score:0 (none)
Answers answers:3 (3+)
answers:0 (none)
isaccepted:yes
hasaccepted:no
inquestion:1234
Views views:250
Sections title:apples
body:"apples oranges"
URL url:"*.example.com"
Favorites infavorites:mine
infavorites:1234
Status closed:yes
duplicate:no
migrated:no
wiki:no
Types is:question
is:answer
Exclude -[tag]
-apples
For more details on advanced search visit our help page
Results tagged with Search options user 11110

Incorporating foreign languages, slang, dialect, and so on into a work.

2
votes
together, you will get a good sense of normal language use and vernacular. my level of command of English language will always be below that of a native speaker. It will be always different, though …
answered Jul 2 '15 by Reed
0
votes
give it a foreign flavor and greater realism. I think that it targets speakers of that second language only if the book is mostly culturally dependent and the readership is assumed to be bilingual. For example a book using Spanish words whose MC is a Mexican descended teenager having a Quinciniera. …
answered Aug 23 '16 by Reed
9
votes
One of the characteristics of the kind of prose you are referring to is a very dull and dry approach, there is often quite unnecessary pompous savant words and an obtuse language, there is also a … philosopher. The other type of prose is clear and visual, it ensnares you into its fold until the language used disappears and you are living in the story. …
answered Nov 7 '14 by Reed
0
votes
i find this type of writing very quickly irritating. If you ask the reader do do an extra effort understanding what you write, you break the narrative flow. Use phonetic writing mininimaly, and only i …
answered Apr 3 '16 by Reed