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Results tagged with Search options answers only user 10479

This tag should be used for questions about the process of writing a certain work.

14
votes
Music is a performance art, it takes place in "real time." Writing does not. So while there is an inevitable trade-off between spontaneity and polish for a musician, the same is not true for a write …
answered Mar 29 '18 by Chris Sunami
1
vote
For the specific question of developing prose rhythm, independent of the other goals, I would recommend spending some time reading and writing strict-form poetry. That will help you internalize a poe …
answered Jun 28 '17 by Chris Sunami
1
vote
Your frustration stems from having a goal --communicating your thoughts externally --that isn't being reached by your process of writing. I'd suggest starting a diary, or a dream journal, or perhaps … some other form of personal writing that isn't intended for an audience, and that isn't focused around a specific goal. This will help you get used to the actual process of writing itself. If you …
answered Sep 5 '18 by Chris Sunami
3
votes
As a long-time blogger, I can say from experience: It's much harder to get any traction with an audience if you don't have a specific topic or theme. But it depends on what your goals for the blog ar …
answered Mar 18 by Chris Sunami
30
votes
I can think of three specific cases where genre conventions can be an important part of the writing process: You are writing a formulaic book, where the familiarity of it is the core of the appeal …
answered Aug 23 '18 by Chris Sunami
1
vote
The core issue may not be the compulsive rewriting, but the difficulty of getting back into the story. Try deliberately stopping in the middle of a sentence, or at least, in the middle of a scene. W …
answered Jan 28 by Chris Sunami
2
votes
Many successful genre-bending stories are essentially one type of story in the setting of another. For instance, the original Star Wars is a fairy tale in space, and the early Harry Potter books are …
answered Jan 3 '17 by Chris Sunami
3
votes
Many books have weak, undeserved, implausible or disconnected endings, so this is one approach that could help that. If you're starting from the end, the questions you want to ask yourself are "What …
answered Feb 5 by Chris Sunami
7
votes
Even if you're thinking of this as primarily a learning project, I would advise trying to get it into publishable shape rather than abandoning it and starting a new one. As you said, it's work you'll …
answered Mar 6 '18 by Chris Sunami
2
votes
Here's a recipe that I use often. It's brief, directly and clearly written, but it still includes some background and history about the recipe, as well as some minimal commentary that allows the writ …
answered Feb 28 by Chris Sunami
2
votes
would suggest, instead of viewing these projects as successes and failures, alive and dead, view all your writing as an exploratory process towards finding your next great theme. Write on something as …
answered May 6 by Chris Sunami
28
votes
Neither being powerful, nor reflecting the author is an insurmountable problem for a character. What you want to avoid is a character who faces no significant problems on her path to success, whose c …
answered Apr 30 '18 by Chris Sunami
7
votes
skip the rewriting process? There is one successful longer work I know of that --at least reportedly --was published largely in the form of its first draft, Keroauc's On the Road. And, personally …
answered May 18 '18 by Chris Sunami
3
votes
As someone who is a big fan of subtext, I find it can be a trap for me, in that I get too obsessed with it, to the point where it hurts the surface text. And I agree with what that a lot of the subte …
answered Jan 20 '17 by Chris Sunami