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Writing a text bubble coming from a military headset. How do you do that? Especially, when the headset is not visible or the character wearing the headset is small. I am not sure how comics handle that. Assume that the character speaking to the character wearing the headset is far away and not inside the comics panel.

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This would really be up to artist preference, but there are plenty of options. Personally I would make the bubbles square instead of round, maybe jagged in shape to give the impression of static over the radio. Often times there won't even be a 'tail' on the bubbles if the character speaking isn't visible in frame either. You could use color coding to help indicate the difference between thoughts and spoken words. I attached a little snippet I made super fast with just what Microsoft Excel comes preloaded with:enter image description here

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  • Agreed I would just note that the spoken bubble attribution pointer is a smooth arrow, the thought bubble attribution pointer is a line of bubbles (of decreasing size, making kind of like an arrow. Electronic speech can be characterized with a different bubble shape (maybe jagged or pointy edge) and a different shape of attribution pointer, like a "lightning bolt" arrow, or a series of parallel curves or lines.
    – Amadeus
    Apr 16, 2022 at 10:31
  • salimbeti.com/aviation/images/buck%20danny/bd07.jpg like this?
    – Sayaman
    Apr 18, 2022 at 16:32
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The type of bubble I usually see used for broadcasts (including radio contact with pilots) is this one:

enter image description here

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