0

3 panels > 1 hour time skip > 3 panels > 4 hours time skip > 5 panels > 5 hours time skip > 3 panels 1 year time skip > 2 panels > 1 hour time skip > 4 panels > 5 hours timeskip 3 panels > 1 hour time skip > 3 panels > 4 hours time skip > 5 panels > 5 hours time skip > 3 panels > 1 hour time skip > 3 panels > 4 hours time skip > 5 panels > 5 hours time skip

Let's take the above example. Is this fine? And is there a way to know for sure if there are too many transitions and not enough meat inside the scenes? I feel there's no clear-cut rules in some situations, but that if you don't have a specific reasons for some weird and quick transitions, then you can follow some principles in order to make sure that your story is fine.

1
  • 2
    I don't think there is any way to say without knowing the story being told. If you tell the story of the universe in comic strip form, the first few panels describe fractions of seconds (big bang, inflation), and then you have time skips of millions of years between panels.
    – user54131
    Apr 8, 2022 at 19:37

1 Answer 1

3

Depends on the story being told. Were this, for instance, the highlights of a journey through a wasteland, it could work perfectly.

Generally, the wise thing to do if you are not certain is obtain beta readers: people who will look at your work. It's wise to have several people do it because one might have a quirky dislike, but it's unlikely that if three people agree there's a problem, that it's just fine.

(I note that while beta readers are very reliable about finding problems, they are less reliable about what exactly the problem is, and still less about the cure.)

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service and acknowledge you have read our privacy policy.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.