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How can I avoid that these two sentences end up with medical system? I do not want to use a synonym for medical system to avoid ambiguity. I further do not want to change the word order of sentence two in a great way because I think it hinders the "flow" of reading. Further, I do not want to use "their" in the second sentence because it may be not clear to what "their" refers to.

Any ideas? :-)

First, Section 2.1 describes how bugs can impair the correct functioning of a medical system. Then, Section 2.2 illustrates how bugs can affect the evolution of a medical system.

Thank you.

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    Welcome to Writing.SE! Questions asking us to rephrase a specific sentence or passage are off-topic here, but I think we can give you some more general advice on how to avoid ending two sentences with the same word or phrase.
    – F1Krazy
    Dec 8, 2021 at 11:10
  • Hi! Thank you for the warm welcome. Ok, I see - looking forward to the general advice :-) Dec 8, 2021 at 14:34
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    Why do you think that ending two consecutive sentences in the same way is a problem. You are trying to be as clear as possible, it is not a novel or poem, leave it clear.
    – Chenmunka
    Dec 8, 2021 at 14:52
  • hm I thought this sounds strange or is a bad practice. But I am happy if it is OK :-) Dec 8, 2021 at 17:58
  • This doesn't sound strange and it is not a bad practice. It is clear. Apparently Section 2 addresses Medical Systems, why would I be surprised that phrase is used repeatedly? If I am reading something about the pancreas, I expect the word "pancreas" to appear often. There is no good substitute.
    – Amadeus
    Dec 9, 2021 at 22:35

2 Answers 2

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I would try to combine them in one sentence:

"First, Section 2.1 describes how bugs can impair the correct functioning of a medical system, with Section 2.2 then illustrating how bugs can affect the evolution of a medical system."

OR:

"First, Section 2.1 describes how bugs can impair the correct functioning of a medical system and Section 2.2 illustrates how bugs can affect the evolution of a medical system."

NOTE: To help with readability, is it veering off course too much to identify the connection with the two medical systems? I think in doing so, it's a lot easier to get away with referring to it twice. For example, if they're the same, say something like, ". . . evolution of said medical system"? Or, if they're different systems, say ". . . evolution of another medical system" or something similar.

Hope this helps!

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It's not that bad for it to be there. It's just that as a writer, you keep reading and rereading what you've wrote, so it seems like you are constantly using a word/phrase.

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