3

Of the two examples, which is better:

(A)

 a = b + c,                          (1)
 where a is ..., b is ..., and c is ...

 [some paragraphs]

 d = a / e                           (2)
 where d is ..., a is ..., and e is ...

(B)

 a = b + c,                          (1)
 where a is ..., b is ..., and c is ...

 [some paragraphs]

 d = a / e                           (2)
 where d is ..., and e is ...
2
  • I mean, I personally feel as long as the values of the variables didn’t change, you can only call them once. But if the values change, it’s best to readdress them. Apr 19 at 20:50
  • Do you have just (1) and (2), or (3), (4)... as well, so the reader has to go back through a number of them to see where the variable was defined?
    – Alexander
    Apr 19 at 22:35
1

What @expert said plus:

If the equations are independent of each other, explain all variables for each equation. If the equations are steps in a process (e.g. a proof), define all variables once. If you explain each of the steps, define the variables as they are mentioned in the explanation.

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