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My story is set in the modern world, and it's based on two POVs: a young teenage boy's POV and his great-grandmother's POV. His grandmother was born and raised in the 30s and therefore has different perceptions and values than her son does. The thing is, her (the grandmother's) granddaughter married a Black person, and is consequently left with a biracial son who she has trouble relating to or liking because of his ancestry.

With this information in mind, is it possible for people to still like the great grandmother WITHOUT excusing or ignoring her racism? She does have other good traits, but I don't want those good qualities to be considered my excuses for her behavior. She also has a hard time loving her great-grandson, which is definitely also going against her.

However, I feel as if I can't make her likable without ignoring her racist values to the point where she can't truly love her grandson. All this to say: How do I make a prejudiced character likable?.

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    Welcome to Writing.SE! We already have two different questions that answer this; I've linked to them in the close message at the top of your question. – F1Krazy Feb 23 at 14:40
  • Have you seen the film Gran Torino? It's important to point out the main character, Walter Kowalski (Clint Eastwood)'s use of racial slurs are only seen under two circumstances, either with friends of his own age, who all talk like that and refer to him with slurs in kind, or towards the Hmong neighbors, who he initially has trouble getting close with due to his past involvement in the Korean war, where he trained himself to dehumanize North Koreans to deal with the trauma of his experience. – hszmv Feb 23 at 14:47
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    As a bit of a help, what likeable traits does the great-grandmother have? – hszmv Feb 23 at 14:49
  • It sounds a bit like the plot to the Halle Berry movie "The Wedding", based on Dorothy West's book of the same title --you might check it out for some inspiration. – Chris Sunami supports Monica Feb 23 at 18:56