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Not long ago, I used to be a regular person with a normal office job, but one day I quit it and started writing articles, sharing stories, and useful tips about life on a small farm. Later I became a writer for a gardening-related website. I adored my job and would never have thought I could burn out.

I'm sure that this year turned out to be very difficult for many of us, and I was no exception. Due to the pandemic, our family faced various problems, some of which we haven't yet resolved. And for about a month now I've been noticing in myself a lack of desire to do anything or write something. It became very difficult for me to concentrate or come up with any ideas for an article. And it happens only with writing. However, this state hasn't affected other areas of life and I feel happy (if I might say so).

Can you please tell me if you faced the same problems and how did you cope with them?

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And now for something completely different...

It sounds more like work fatigue causing writer's block. COVID is sorta soul-crushing, and it was easier to choose to write when I knew I had alternatives. My suggestion would be to keep writing, but do something completely different. Unfortunately, this doesn't take away the very real pressure to churn out product, but it might re-introduce some fun into the process and get you back to where you were when you decided to chuck the 9-5 world and do what you love.

I hope your computer is a lap-top and has a good battery. Go to a park to write, where you aren't comfortable and weird sights and sound keep intruding. I'm not advising this long-term, but as a way to change the setting. When you come back to your nice, sane desk, you'll have lots of fresh stimulus, plus the desk will seem a calm island to filter all that info.

Write poetry. I recently visited a piece of land that had been in my family for decades but that was going to be sold. I SUCK at poetry, but felt that only poetry could express the weird 'can't go back to childhood' feelings I had. Try to write a short story where you impose ridiculous constraints on your writing ("So today, my character is a lesbian vampire in a deep-sea diving facility trying to find an alternative to human blood in giant squid. GO.") If you can't write that story, research giant squid, deep-sea diving and how a vampire might be a great candidate (no sun, no bends, doesn't need oxygen, is trying to develop a taste for sea food).

Writing should be FUN, and if you are crushing the fun out of writing, you need to take a break from that. Besides, I'd be interested in reading the novel after you can't get the vampire story out of your head.

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  • the lesbian scuba vampire definitely gets a +1 – Spencer Barnes Sep 14 at 14:33
  • @Spencer Barnes Sad thing is, I find myself writing the story in my head, with the vampire watching the female octopus, embracing her inhumanity, and seeking out the female who's dying as she cares for her eggs, because that's how the cephalopod life cycle works. Together forever in the ocean depths... – DWKraus Sep 14 at 16:47
  • :D interesting take on it - my thoughts were veering more toward the lonely vampire trying desparately to fit in with society at some diving-oriented holiday resort, but the fangs puncturing the scuba tube and leaving all sorts of questions among the other divers (why isn't she dead etc) - and for some reason, I find the mental image of a well-meaning vampire attempting to go vegetarian and putting themselves entirely on a diet of sushi and diet coke, quite amusing. Sorry to disregard the squid thing. – Spencer Barnes Sep 15 at 6:50
  • Sapphic Celia sucks cephalopods? I'd read that. – ItWasLikeThatWhenIGotHere Sep 15 at 13:48

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