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Here are two alternatives, one with a hyphen of previously-obscured one without as previously obscured:

As our global society becomes evermore connected, we become increasingly aware of the previously-obscured impact of our actions on each other and our environment.

or

As our global society becomes evermore connected, we become increasingly aware of the previously obscured impact of our actions on each other and our environment.

Does adding the hyphen work to provide impact, emphasis, and clarity that previously obscured is an adjective or will it be confusing to readers to see a hyphen here between words not usually seen put together with a hyphen?

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    By common style, adverbs that end in -ly are not hyphenated. – Jason Bassford Aug 10 at 17:40
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In the vast majority of cases, you will never hyphenate an adverb-adjective phrase in the way you're describing. In modern writing, it would be considered clunky and displeasing, and give your writing an archaic look.

The practice of hyphenating adverb phrases likely originates from phrases like "two-word" or "one-note" or "close-knit," which are grammatically correct adjective-noun phrases. Thereby, it seems like you could do a similar thing with adverbs, i.e. "closely-knit." However, nowadays it is nonstandard grammar to do so, and it's best to avoid it.

(Further reading: https://writemymemoirs.com/my-strongly-expressed-mandate-no-hyphens-after-adverbs/)

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“A well-placed hyphen can lend writing c-l-a-r-i-t-y” ... Also see dashes and spelling compound words with or without hyphens. ... It produces a sudden jolt of emphasis, an abrupt pause that draws a dramatic halt to the rhythm ... Intended for the eye rather than the ear, it functions without personality, style, or rhythmic impact.

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