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I have a written response that involves several sources from foreign languages (namely Latin and Italian, with the paper being written in English). How would I quote and reference these sources? For example, would I run the quotes through Google Translate or similar software? (The task explicitly requires APA 7 referencing)

  • I would not suggest google. Are there any other cites that you can think of that offer those options? – Acid Kritana May 22 at 15:38
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These references are from APA 6, not 7, but it appears that these guidelines have not changed.

When including material that was not originally published in English, you have a number of options.

  • You can quote the text in the original language and leave it untranslated:

“Les jeunes qui terminent un placement à l’âge de la majorité dans le cadre du système de protection de la jeunesse sont plus vulnérables” (Bussières, St-Germain, Dubé, & Richard, 2017, p. 354).

  • You can include the original text and a translation:

Research has addressed that “Les jeunes qui terminent un placement à l’âge de la majorité dans le cadre du système de protection de la jeunesse sont plus vulnérables” [Youth who finish a placement at the age of majority in the framework of the youth protection system are more vulnerable] (Bussières, St-Germain, Dubé, & Richard, 2017, p. 354).

  • You can translate the text yourself, in which case the translation is considered a paraphrase (and so no quotation marks are included):

Youth who finish a placement at the age of majority in the framework of the youth protection system are more vulnerable (Bussières, St-Germain, Dubé, & Richard, 2017, p. 354).

  • You can cite a translation that someone else has published, in which case the in-text citation includes the year the translation was published, but the name of the original author(s):

"Youth who finish a placement at the age of majority in the framework of the youth protection system are more vulnerable" (Bussières, St-Germain, Dubé, & Richard, 2018, p. 355).

As to how generate the translation, in the case that no published translation exists, that's up to your discretion. You can use Google Translate, but depending on the language it can be somewhat to very unreliable. But because your translation is considered a paraphrase, the same rules apply to the translation as to any other paraphrase (that is, there are no strict rules - if your publisher thinks the translation is reasonable, then it's fine).


References:

https://blog.apastyle.org/apastyle/translations/
https://blog.apastyle.org/apastyle/2014/11/lost-in-translation-citing-your-own-translations-in-apa-style.html
https://blog.apastyle.org/apastyle/2012/12/citing-translated-works-in-apa-style.html

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