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I know CMOS 17 section 6.2 says, "All punctuation marks should appear in the same font—roman or italic—as the main or surrounding text, except for punctuation that belongs to a title in a different font (usually italics)."

I understand how that applies to an italicized word or phrase within a roman sentence—"This is the best pizza ever!"—but as applies to dialogue in fiction writing, I need some clarification, please.

  1. I believe the punctuation of a one-word sentence of dialogue is italicized if alone on a line. Is that correct?

"Yikes!" --or-- "Yikes!"

  1. And if it's not alone on a line, I think it's still italicized with the word, but I'm not entirely sure.

"Yikes!" She snatched her hand back. --or-- "Yikes!" She snatched her hand back.

  1. I believe the punctuation of a one-word sentence of dialogue attached to a larger roman sentence would remain roman. Is that correct?

"Crap," she snapped, crumpling the paper. --or-- "Crap," she snapped, crumpling the paper.

Thanks for any help or guidance.

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I've always had trouble with this, but when it comes down to it, I usually stick to what looks natural. For me, that's "Yikes!" rather than "Yikes!" Same with question marks. It just seems a lot clearer visually. I've read professionally published books with both, I believe. If I find a better answer, I'll definitely give an update.

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I suggest doing Yikes! rather than Yikes! because it is clearer and makes more sense to me. Is the Yikes the part that is only Italic or do you want the person to say Yikes! in italic? You want the person to say Yikes! because what is the point of punctuation if you don't! It is also easier for the reader to understand.

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