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I'm wondering if there is a English writing technique or style I can use to show that the result that appeared is contrary to the expectation of the first-person narrator? (I'm not using garden-sentences for this)

Example Context:

After going through a Life-and-Death Trial, First-person Narrator has following conversation with their teacher.

Teacher: "I put you through a Trial to awaken your talent."

First-person Narrator: "That's absurd."

Teacher: "In general, most people are unable to awaken their talent until they face a life and death situation. In fact, its a lack of encountering life and death situations that prevent most people from awakening their talent."

First-person Narrator: "Then, for that reason you made me take the trial?"

Narrator's Inner thoughts: insert sentence that shows the result that appeared (Teacher's "In general..." response) is contrary to the expectation of the narrator

closed as unclear what you're asking by Rand al'Thor, Galastel, Evil Sparrow, Thomo, fifthviolet Sep 16 at 2:57

Please clarify your specific problem or add additional details to highlight exactly what you need. As it's currently written, it’s hard to tell exactly what you're asking. See the How to Ask page for help clarifying this question. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

  • Welcome to Writing.SE Toyu_Frey, glad you found us. We have a tour and help center you might wish to check out. I'm afraid I don't really understand your question. Unless your story is first person, the narrator is not the same as the point of view character. And I'm not sure there is a name for "character learned something new." Could you perhaps edit the question to make it clearer? Thanks. – Cyn Sep 15 at 16:39
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Writing is all about conditioning the reader's expectations. All the big effects in writing come from an appropriate setup. If you want to show a result contrary to the narrator's expectations, you make sure that the reader is aware of the narrator's expectations before the event occurs. This is the answer to every effect you want to create. It is not about how you write the event itself, it is about how you condition the reader's expectations before the event occurs. It is the cheerleader walking down the stairs into the darkened basement. It is not about how you film the scene. It is about the previous scene where the killer snuck into the basement.

  • That ending was surprisingly dark, +1 anyways though for a good answer. – DJ Spicy Deluxe Sep 16 at 2:32

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