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What's the proper way of indicating that a car has reached its destination during a dialogue? For example, two persons have a conversation, and they reach a destination, is there a standard way to do this?

For example:

...

"I am not sure if we should really talk about this, because you know, it's a real pain in the ass to talk about personal issues, you know."

"Yeah, it might be true. Let's not talk about this anymore" he said as he looked out the window of the car and saw the headquarter rapidly approaching. "We've reached our destination."

"Already?"

"It has been an hour."

"Jeez, time can fly."

I am not sure why, but revealing it in the dialog tag sounds really weird, is there a better way to do this properly?

  • It we already know the guy was in a car, why do we need to be told that he "looked out of the window of the car"? If he did something interesting (like bending down and squinting through a bullet hole in the body work, while pretending that the blindfold put on him by his captors was still in place) that's worth telling. But don't waste words on things that are obvious. – alephzero Aug 4 '19 at 12:11
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You're running into problems because you're putting too much focus on the details of the transition, instead of just marking it as a transition and moving into the next scene.

Try using a single reference to the arrival. For example:

"Yeah, it might be true," he said as he gazed out the window. "We're here. Let's not talk about this anymore."

Or you can skip to an action that makes it obvious they've arrived.

"I am not sure if we should really talk about this, because you know, it's a real pain in the ass to talk about personal issues, you know."

"I guess."

They rode in silence for several more minutes. As they were unloading the car, Fred turned to Gina. "Let's not talk about this anymore."

Or you can end the scene while they're in the car and skip to the next one, whenever it may be.

"I am not sure if we should really talk about this, because you know, it's a real pain in the ass to talk about personal issues, you know."

"I guess."

At dinner that night...

Put in enough information that it's really clear to the reader where and when the characters are. But don't feel you need to spell it out. Your audience will fill in the gaps. So let them. It's part of what allows a reader to bond with the story.

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    Another method I've seen used in books is 'He pulled the car up', usually followed by an explanation of where, E.G. 'He pulled the car up by the side of the road', 'They pulled up to their destination.' – SSight3 Aug 3 '19 at 12:46
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    @SSight3 That works too. But I wouldn't use the "to their destination" version. Because the reader can assume that based on the fact that they're getting out of the car, unloading their luggage/bags/etc. If it's different from expected, then the author should alert the reader. But you can describe the building: "pulled up to a long concrete building with no windows on the first floor." – Cyn says make Monica whole Aug 3 '19 at 15:51
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    Upvoted specifically for "We're here." – barbecue Aug 3 '19 at 18:52

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