5

My Question

How can I avoid using I repetitively in a resume/about me, should it be avoided or is it to be expected in that kind of writing? Are there any substitutes that can be used in place of it, or should the structure of sentences be modified altogether?

The about me page that I'm struggling with, an example

My name is Azat. I am an aspiring software developer based in Washington. My primary interests lie in Mobile and Web development. I have a strong foundation in Java, shown in my Android applications which have thousands of downloads on the Google Play Store. I have a solid knowledge of JavaScript and Bootstrap, and am well versed in Photoshop and SolidWorks. I have created several responsive websites such as my website about inauthentic learning. I have competed in Cyberpatriot X at the state level, and was in charge of our Windows machines. My other hobbies include modding phones, reading, card games, and poetry. Currently I am looking for internship opportunities that can utilize my existing programming skills and allow me to expand them further. My long term goal is to pursue a career in Web/Android development. Please feel free to contact me using the information in the contact section or view my resume.

--EDIT-- This question is different than others on overusing I because it specifically refers to a resume/about me writing format.

  • Welcome to Writers.SE. This group is not for the critique or commenting on particular pieces of writing. – JP Chapleau Jul 11 '18 at 20:36
  • @JPChapleau that was not my intention, I simply wished to exemplify what I meant with the repetitive i's. – Azat V Jul 11 '18 at 21:14
  • 4
    Possible duplicate of How can I stop overusing "I" in my writing? – Craig Sefton Jul 11 '18 at 21:19
  • @JPChapleau You're right, per the help center it appears to be out of bounds. – Mast Jul 11 '18 at 21:37
3

Speaking as a former division manager of a public company that has hired dozens of programmers and engineers and read hundreds of resumes:

Use "I". It is expected. Stick to the facts, do not engage in puffery, but do not be afraid to note very positive results; either (as you have).

Do not be so stilted in your language. I would not use the word "utilize", "use" is sufficient. "Currently" is not necessary either.

Currently I am looking for internship opportunities that can utilize my existing programming skills and allow me to expand them further.

I would like an internship that uses my existing programming skills, with opportunities to expand them further.

... My primary interests are in ...

... and I am well versed ...

I would not mention any other hobbies unless they directly relate to your technical skills. None of yours do (not even modding phones, which suggests you are a hacker).

My long term goal is a career in Web/Android development.

Thank you for your consideration, my contact information is on my resume, and below:
Azat@example.com
Cell: 999-999-9999
etc.

Good luck.

  • There are actually domain names that are specifically reserved for examples and documentation. I've edited this answer; you might want to use those domain names in similar situations in the future. – a CVn Jul 11 '18 at 19:52
  • @MichaelKjörling I'm fine with your edit. – Amadeus Jul 11 '18 at 19:54
  • Thank you for the answer, it was very helpful and gave me some good insight. The other revisions are also much appreciated. – Azat V Jul 11 '18 at 20:55
5

Most résumés seem to solve this issue by creating bullet points and starting each bullet point with the verb.

2

Modern thinking on the use of pronouns ('I') in resumes is that they should be avoided. The reason for this is simple - anyone who reads it already knows that the information is about you.

The standard approach is to start each sentence or, more commonly, bullet point with an action verb. This method leads you towards sentences like these:

  • Aspiring software developer based in Washington.
  • Interested primarily in Mobile and Web development.
  • Having a strong foundation in Java as demonstrated by my Android applications which have thousands of downloads on the Google Play Store.
  • Developed a solid knowledge of JavaScript and Bootstrap Expert in Photoshop and SolidWorks.
  • Created several responsive websites such as my website about inauthentic learning.
  • etc.

If you want more help on choosing suitable action verbs then this cheat sheet is pretty good: List of Action Verbs for Resumes & Professional Profiles, but other lists exist, so look around.

Good luck with your career.

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