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Me and my professor will meet tomorrow. Since it's been a long time after we last talked about the meeting,I'm thinking about sending her an email reminder. But I'm not sure about how to write this email.

Is it okay to say "Shall I meet you tomorrow at ..."? or should I mention our previous conversation? How to do it in a polite way?

Thanks a lot!

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    Do you simply have reason to believe that your professor isn't using a calendar to record appointments made, or do you want to add something that would be good for your professor to know which hasn't been brought up previously for one reason or another? Frankly, if someone sent me a reminder for an appointment already mutually agreed upon and which is sitting squarely in my calendar without adding any new information, it wouldn't exactly register positively with me on the person sending me the reminder. – a CVn Jan 11 '18 at 18:14
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Personnally, I like to send a meeting reminder that is not just a reminder, but adds new information to the previous correspondence. For example, I might suggest a meeting agenda, inform the person what the meeting is about or what it is that I would like to talk about.

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    This is a good idea. I will sometimes provide an outline and information that would be useful for the 'boss' to have ahead of time. Example: I am in research, and might provide some data that the 'boss' does not yet have, and say "I thought it would be helpful for you to have this before our meeting." – DPT Jan 11 '18 at 18:01
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If all aspects of the meeting are already set (place, time, agenda), then you could go with something like "I'm looking forward to meeting with you tomorrow. I'm glad we'll have time to talk about..."

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"Shall I meet you..." is fine, but you would try and make it sound pleasant. Maybe you are looking forward to it, or maybe you could talk to them about something interesting, then say something like see you tommorow/soon! I would suggest doing it so that it sounds pleasant and polite.

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