1

I'm looking for examples of bilingual (or trilingual, etc) writers who actually read foreign translations of their works and comment on them. I'm curious to know how they feel. Are they generally satisfied with these translations? Do they feel uncomfortable about other people "messing" with their creations? Any common mistakes that they point out? I want to know their side of the story.

  • 1
    Hi @kuchitsu, I find your question very interesting, but it is a bit too broad or opinion-based by the standards of the community, and it risks to be closed. Are you able to make it more specific? Maybe just focusing on one aspect of the perception of a translated work? – FraEnrico Jan 1 '18 at 15:26
  • 2
    It's a good question, but it's too opinion based for SE. I suggest trying reddit. – FFN Jan 4 '18 at 12:44
  • 1
    I'm voting to close this question as off-topic because it is not about writing technique. It probably belongs on Literature if anywhere. – user16226 Feb 2 '18 at 13:54
1

An artical about Murakami: https://www.newyorker.com/books/page-turner/lost-in-translation

excerpt: ...Jay Rubin, one of Murakami’s longtime translators, told me in Tokyo last month, explaining what he says to American readers, most of whom prefer to believe otherwise. “Murakami wrote the names and locations, but the English words are mine.” Murakami once told me that he never reads his books in translation because he doesn’t need to. While he can speak and read English with great sensitivity, reading his own work in another language could be disappointing—or worse. “My books exist in their original Japanese. That’s what’s most important, because that’s how I wrote them.”...

| improve this answer | |
0

Milan Kundera is a Czech author, who has lived in France since 1975. He wrote his first novels in Czech, but he switched to French after going to exile in 1975 after Soviet invasion to Czechoslovakia. He was stripped of Czechoslovak citizenship in 1979 by the Czechoslovak communist regime.

He can speak Czech, of course. That is why he rarely allows his French novels to be translated to Czech by Czech translators; his opinion is he can translate his own work better than any translator. Czech readers must wait for the translation many years longer than the rest of the world.

| improve this answer | |

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.