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I am trying to cite a paper that paraphrases a quote from another paper by the same authors. However, 1) it is unclear where the paraphrase starts, and 2) they have not yet published the second paper. The full quote I wish to cite looks something like this:

  1. text text text (clearly this article)
  2. several sentences that could be either part of this article or paraphrased from another article (no quotes or clear division)
  3. citation of a forthcoming article by the authors

My overall question is how to cite this/these quote(s). More specifically, do I

  1. simply cite the current article and truncate/ignore the authors' in-text citations,
  2. leave the authors' in-text citation as-is in the quote, but only cite the current paper in the bibliography,
  3. cite both papers in-text and in the bibliography, or
  4. something else entirely?

I am using APA.

Thanks!

4

In APA, if you source looks like this:

For over 20 years, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) has been viewed as comprising three primary symptoms, these being poor sustained attention, impulsiveness, and hyperactivity (American Psychiatric Association [APA], 1980, 1987; Barkley, 1981; Douglas, 1972, 1983).

and that source is:

Barkley, R. A. (1997). Behavioral inhibition, sustained attention, and executive functions: Constructing a unifying theory of ADHD. Psychological Bulletin, 121(1), 65–94. doi:10.1037/0033-2909.121.1.65

then you include the references given in the source when you cite from it:

According to Barkley (1997), ADHD "has been viewed as comprising three primary symptoms, these being poor sustained attention, impulsiveness, and hyperactivity (American Psychiatric Association [APA], 1980, 1987; Barkley, 1981; Douglas, 1972, 1983)", while according to ..."

but in your list of references you only list the source that you have read and used, which (in this example) is Barkley (1997). You do not list the sources that that author has used (and you haven't).

So what you do is your option 2.


If your source is well written, it should be clear what parts of it a reference applies to. Usually, if the reference is at the end of the sentence, it applies to the whole sentence (as in my example above). If it is in the middle of the sentence, it applies to the part of it that comes before it. In the following example, the first reference is the source for the prevalence of ADHD among children:

ADHD has a prevalence of around 5% among children (Someone, 2013) and 2.5% among adults (Someoneelse, 2007).

In the following example, the reference is to a single word:

The procedure or "process" (Gross, 1998) of ...

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