2

For example:

An RLC circuit is composed of resistor, inductor, and capacitor elements.

Or:

An RLC circuit is composed of a resistor, an inductor, and a capacitor elements.

Which one is grammatically correct?

5
  • Welcome to Stack Exchange (I'll let a mod do the proper welcome). I think you should ask that on English Stack Exchange.
    – user18743
    Jun 13 '17 at 6:43
  • Thanks for the suggestion @NathanCoustenoble. I just asked the same on English section. Do you think I should delete this post? Jun 13 '17 at 19:55
  • 2
    Oh, oops -- I was answering it here while you were asking it there. Therefore I won't migrate it; that'd just create two copies over there. The community here might decide it's off-topic and put it on hold; it seems borderline enough to me that I'm not unilaterally closing it as a moderator. Jun 13 '17 at 20:00
  • @user84204884834329 Well, if I had to close every borderline question I asked, I wouldn't have any left, so I'm not really going to judge either.
    – user18743
    Jun 14 '17 at 8:38
3

It depends. How many of them are there?

An RLC circuit is composed of a resistor, an inductor, and a capacitor elements.

This means that an RLC circuit has exactly one of each of these three elements. I crossed out your final "elements", because if you say that an X consists of an A, a B, and a C, you don't then add the category noun after. A sentence with the same meaning as yours is:

An RLC circuit is composed of the following elements: a resistor, an inductor, and a capacitor.

The other option you asked about is:

An RLC circuit is composed of resistor, inductor, and capacitor elements.

This means that an RLC circuit has some combination of those elements, possibly including more than one of each. In some contexts it could mean that some categories are absent, though engineers and other "close readers" might take it to mean "at least one of each".

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