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On the other hand, people describe Odysseus as a hero because he fights in the Trojan War and fulfills his rights as king by slaughtering all of Penelope’s suitors. Upon his return to Ithaca, he finds out that suitors were consuming his goods and courting his wife. People, specifically the Greeks, considered this as an act of heroism. Heroes to the Greeks are defined as strong, burly, and brave warriors, yet with minuscule to fatal flaws. Odysseus’s revenge is considered a flaw. Though he technically does have the rights to take his revenge, slaughtering the suitors and harlots with a little valid crime is barbarous. The harlots and suitors are not planning on revolting against him, they have no idea that Odysseus is truly back. This act is unjustified and a true hero would of not have gone on a massacre of rage.

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    Hi, and welcome to Writers. We have specific guidelines for critique questions, which this does not fit. Stack Exchange is not a discussion board or an online workshop; we are a Q&A site. We require clear, answerable questions which have the potential to help others in the future. This question would only benefit you and not anyone else, so it's off-topic. Please take our tour and see our help center writers.stackexchange.com/help/on-topic to see what kinds of questions we answer. – Lauren-Clear-Monica-Ipsum Mar 31 '17 at 0:07
  • It's also heavily dependent on your modern understanding of the term Hero, of which the ancient Greeks had an entirely different understanding. Hero did not mean good guy - and a look at any of the great heroes of antiquity will quickly show you that. – user18397 Mar 31 '17 at 2:18
  • Hello IB student... doing TOK... – Kyle Li Mar 31 '17 at 8:05
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It doesn’t flow very well. Consider:

On the other hand, people describe Odysseus as a hero because he fights in the Trojan War and fulfills his rights as king by slaughtering all of Penelope’s suitors.

Upon his return to Ithaca, he finds out that suitors were consuming his goods and courting his wife.

People, specifically the Greeks, considered this as an act of heroism.

What is an act of heroism? What is the referent of this? Consuming his goods and courting his wife? That’s the last thing mentioned. Or perhaps, finding out what the suitors were doing?

No; I think you mean the Greeks considered Odysseus’s slaughter of the suitors to be the act of heroism. So, either rewrite to place that directly before the sentence about heroism; or replace “this” with something more explicit such as “his slaughter of the suitors”.

Heroes to the Greeks are defined as strong, burly, and brave warriors, yet with minuscule to fatal flaws.

Doesn’t that mean that, even with whatever flaws you can find in him, Odysseus is still a hero (at least by Greek lights)?

Phrasing note: I would say “yet with flaws ranging from minuscule to fatal”. Seems more readable to me.

Odysseus’s revenge is considered a flaw.

By whom? You? The Greeks? Some particular Greeks?

Though he technically does have the rights to take his revenge, slaughtering the suitors and harlots

Whoops, where’d those harlots come from? They were not mentioned before. It’s been decades since I read it, but I remember the suitors quite well and do not recall any harlots.

with a little valid crime

???

is barbarous. The harlots and suitors are not planning on revolting against him, they have no idea that Odysseus is truly back.

I seem to recall that Odysseus felt certain that the suitors would kill him if they knew who he was.

This act is unjustified and a true hero would of not have gone on a massacre of rage.

Again, is a flawed hero still a hero or not? Ajax went on a massacre of rage, but he was also a strong, burly, and brave warrior.

In summary, I don’t think you’re making your case very well. First, you should clarify whether you mean you don’t consider Odysseus to be a hero, or the Greeks did not, or some particular Greeks did not. Second, you should argue in the abstract for your criteria of hero vs. non-hero. Only then can you apply those criteria to the specific case of Odysseus.

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