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After using a Logitech Internet Pro keyboard for the past several years, as well as an Acer OEM keyboard occasionally, I'm seriously thinking about getting a new keyboard. I write upwards of 7,000 words a week, and I'd like something that just feels really good to type on. I typically prefer low profile keyboards when I've used them, and definitely want something with thinner keys than the Internet Pro. I had considered getting the Apple Wireless keyboard so I could use it with my iPad, but seems odd to get it considering I use a Windows 7 PC most of the time and don't own a Mac.

With that in mind, what is your favorite keyboard and why? I'd really like to know what keyboards other writers love. Hopefully that'll help me make a better decision. I'd rather not spend too much on one, but sometimes quality is worth paying for. I just want to make sure I'm getting something I'll use for a long time for the price!

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    I'm voting to close, since "what to buy" questions are just not a good fit for SE sites in general. – JSBձոգչ Mar 28 '11 at 13:19
  • @justkt - I'm a college student and tech writer. I essentially HTML formatted articles on WordPress and APA formatted Word documents. – maguay Mar 28 '11 at 13:24
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    How is this not a poll that should be closed immediately? – Martha Mar 28 '11 at 14:07
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    Vote to close as a poll the community question. – Ralph Gallagher Mar 28 '11 at 19:19
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I prefer a buckling-spring keyboard like the old IBM Model M or the ones made by Clicky Keyboards. I only wish I could find that feature in a more ergonomic layout.

Buckling-spring keys provide better tactile feedback than bubble keyboards, and I find that causes me to type faster and more lightly (rather than mashing the keys), easing strain on my hands and wrists.

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My keyboard has to be hard (I want to feel typing) and heavy (not to fly away when I cough). It is enough.

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  • Heavy is definitely important. That's perhaps the worst problem of most OEM keyboards shipped with PCs; they slide all over the place. Though that said, the worst is when the keys are so wobbly they feel like they'll fall off. – maguay Mar 28 '11 at 13:26
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I had terrible tendonitis in both arms for a while, and I had to get a mega-customizable ergo keyboard.

http://www.comfortkeyboard.com/

They are not cheap, but I didn't have to get CTS surgery either. :) You can rotate each of the three pieces to the point where you can almost type vertically. It takes a while to get used to, and most of my coworkers couldn't figure out how to use the thing (which is a bonus if you don't like other people touching your keyboard).

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I use a Microsoft ComfortCurve keyboard at work. I was skeptical at first, but was surprised at how comfortable it actually was after I bought it. It has a fairly simple layout, and I find that I can reach all the important keys with ease. What I really like about it, though, is the way it feels when I type. The keyboard does not slide around (as some do) and each key press is smooth. I do not have to strain my fingers to press down on a key either, unlike some of the OEM keyboards that tend to favour the clickety, typewriter-ish feel.

When it comes to choosing the "right" keyboard, I think it's a personal choice. Like choosing a musical instrument or a car. You have to try out different types then choose the one that complements you.

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I use a Happy Hacking Keyboard Lite2. Though it's not cheap, I have many reasons why:

  • Small: it's half the size of a piece of 8 1/2 x 11 sheet of paper
  • Fewer Keys: they've "hidden" nearly half of the normal amount of keys (many of which are useless 99.9% of the time) behind a Fn + Key combination.
  • Solid / Deep Contact: it's almost impossible to strike adjacent keys on accident, as is so common with shallow striking keyboards.
  • Cross Platform: I use an Ubuntu machine at work and a Mac at home, and it saves me even the slightest bit of mental stress to use the same keyboard with the same key mapping.
  • Durable: It's extremely durable
  • USB: x2 ports easily accessible on the back. With a very long cord, this is great for desktop machines.
  • Pleasing sound: the loud but beautiful sound of the keys constantly reminds me that I am very serious about the writing I am doing.
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